Acute accent

acuteĺsíneadh fada´accentfadaaccent aiguacutesé
The acute accent is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.wikipedia
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Diacritic

diacriticsdiacritical markdiacritical marks
The acute accent is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.
Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents.

Apex (diacritic)

apexapices
An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels.
In written Latin, the apex (plural "apices") is a mark with roughly the shape of an acute accent which is placed over vowels to indicate that they are long.

Greek diacritics

polytonicpolytonic orthographymonotonic orthography
The acute accent was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, where it indicated a syllable with a high pitch.
The acute accent (´ ), the circumflex (ˆ ), and the grave accent (` ) indicate different kinds of pitch accent.

Greek alphabet

GreekGreek lettersGreek letter
The acute accent is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.
In the polytonic orthography traditionally used for ancient Greek, the stressed vowel of each word carries one of three accent marks: either the acute accent, the grave accent, or the circumflex accent (α̃ or α̑).

Grave accent

graveùbackquote
Bulgarian: stress, which is variable in Bulgarian, is not usually indicated in Bulgarian except in dictionaries and sometimes in homonyms that are distinguished only by stress. However, Bulgarian usually uses the grave accent to mark the vowel in a stressed syllable, unlike Russian, which uses the acute accent. French. The acute is used only on é. It is known as accent aigu, in contrast to the accent grave which is the accent sloped the other way. It distinguishes é from è, ê, and e . Unlike other Romance languages, the accent marks do not imply stress in French.
The grave and circumflex have been replaced with an acute accent in the modern monotonic orthography.

Russian language

RussianRussian-languageRussian:
Russian. Stress is irregular in Russian, and in reference and teaching materials (dictionaries and books for children or foreigners), stress is indicated by an acute accent above the stressed vowel. The acute accent can be used both in the Cyrillic and sometimes in the romanised text.
Stress, which is unpredictable, is not normally indicated orthographically though an optional acute accent may be used to mark stress, such as to distinguish between homographic words, for example замо́к (zamók, meaning a lock) and за́мок (zámok, meaning a castle), or to indicate the proper pronunciation of uncommon words or names.

Welsh orthography

Welshm'''a'''mmodern Welsh orthography
Welsh: word stress usually falls on the penultimate syllable, but one way of indicating stress on a final (short) vowel is by the use of the acute accent. In the Welsh orthography, it can be on any vowel: á, é, í, ó, ú, ẃ, or ý. Examples: casáu "to hate", sigarét "cigarette", ymbarél "umbrella".
The acute accent (acen ddyrchafedig), the grave accent (acen ddisgynedig), the circumflex (acen grom, to bach or hirnod) and the diaeresis mark (didolnod) are also used on vowels, but accented letters are not regarded as part of the alphabet.

Pitch-accent language

pitch accentpitchaccent
The acute accent was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, where it indicated a syllable with a high pitch.
In polytonic orthography, accented vowels are marked with the acute accent.

Spanish orthography

Spanishabecedarioami'''g'''o
Spanish marks stressed syllables in words that deviate from the standardized stress patterns. It is also used to distinguish homophones such as el (the) and él (he).
When acute accent and diaeresis marks are used on vowels (,,, and ) they are considered variants of the plain vowel letters, but is considered a separate letter from.

Double acute accent

Őűdouble acute
Hungarian: í, ó, ú are the long equivalents of the vowels i, o, u. The ő, ű (see double acute accent) are the long equivalents of ö, ü. Both type of accents are known as hosszú ékezet (hosszú means long). The letters á and é are two long vowels but they are two vowels on their own rather than the long equivalents of a and e (see below in Letter extension).
In the 18th century, before Hungarian orthography became fixed, u and o with umlaut + acute were used in some printed documents.

Lakota language

LakotaLakhotaStandard Lakota Orthography
Lakota. For example, kákhi "in that direction" but kakhí "take something to someone back there".
The vowels are a, e, i, o, u; nasal vowels are aŋ, iŋ, uŋ. Pitch accent is marked with an acute accent: á, é, í, ó, ú, áŋ, íŋ, úŋ on stressed vowels (which receive a higher tone than non-stressed ones)

Vowel length

shortlonglong vowel
An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels.
Acute accent, used to indicate a long vowel in Czech, Slovak, Old Norse, Hungarian, Irish, traditional Scottish Gaelic (for long [oː] ó, [eː] é, as opposed to [ɛː] è, [ɔː] ò) and pre-20th-century transcriptions of Sanskrit, Arabic, etc.

Old Norse

NorseOld ScandinavianON
Old Norse: á, é, í, ó, ú, ý are the long versions of a, e, i, o, u, y. Sometimes, is used as the long version of, but is used more often. Sometimes, the short-lived Old Icelandic long (also written ) is written using an acute-accented form,, or a version with a macron,, but usually it is not distinguished from from which it is derived by u-mutation.
Long vowels are denoted with acutes.

Unicode

Unicode StandardUU+
However, for computer use, Unicode conflates the codepoints for these letters with those of the accented Latin letters of similar appearance.
For example, a Latin small letter "i" with an ogonek, a dot above, and an acute accent, which is required in Lithuanian, is represented by the character sequence U+012F, U+0307, U+0301.

Caron

háčekhačekǍ
When appearing in consonants, it indicates palatalization, similar to the use of the háček in Czech and other Slavic languages (e.g. sześć "six").
The name appears in most English dictionaries, but they treat the long mark (acute accent) differently.

Modern Greek

GreekModernmodern Greek language
Modern Greek marks the stressed vowel of every polysyllabic word: ά .
There are two diacritical symbols, the acute accent which indicates stress and the diaeresis marking a vowel letter as not being part of a digraph.

Latin

Lat.Latin languagelat
An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels.
Then, long vowels, except for, were frequently marked using the apex, which was sometimes similar to an acute accent.

Italian language

ItalianitItalian-language
Italian The accent is used to indicate the stress in a word, or whether the vowel is "open" or "wide", or "closed", or "narrow". For example, pèsca "peach" ("open" or "wide" vowel, as in "pen") and pésca "fishing" ("closed" or "narrow" vowel, as in "pain").
The acute accent is used over word-final to indicate a stressed front close-mid vowel, as in perché "why, because". In dictionaries, it is also used over to indicate a stressed back close-mid vowel (azióne). The grave accent is used over word-final to indicate a front open-mid vowel, as in tè "tea". The grave accent is used over any vowel to indicate word-final stress, as in gioventù "youth". Unlike, which is a close-mid vowel, a stressed final is always a back open-mid vowel (andrò), making unnecessary outside of dictionaries. Most of the time, the penultimate syllable is stressed. But if the stressed vowel is the final letter of the word, the accent is mandatory, otherwise it is virtually always omitted. Exceptions are typically either in dictionaries, where all or most stressed vowels are commonly marked. Accents can optionally be used to disambiguate words that differ only by stress, as for prìncipi "princes" and princìpi "principles", or àncora "anchor" and ancóra "still/yet". For monosyllabic words, the rule is different: when two orthographically identical monosyllabic words with different meanings exist, one is accented and the other is not (example: è "is", e "and").

Icelandic orthography

IcelandicIcelandic alphabetalphabetically
In Icelandic the acute accent is used on all 6 of the vowels (a, e, i, o, u and y), and, like in Faroese, these are considered separate letters..]]
The Icelandic alphabet is a Latin-script alphabet including some letters duplicated with acute accents; in addition, it includes the letter eth, transliterated as d, and the runic letter thorn, transliterated as th (see picture); Ææ and Öö are considered letters in their own right and not a ligature or diacritical version of their respective letters.

Swedish language

SwedishSwedish-languageSwedish-speaking
Norwegian, Swedish and Danish use the acute accent to indicate that a terminal syllable with the e is stressed and is often omitted if it does not change the meaning: armen (first syllable stressed) means "the arm" while armé(e)n means "the army"; ide (first syllable stressed) means "bear's den" while idé means "idea". Also stress-related are the different spellings of the words en/én and et/ét (the indefinite article and the word "one" in Danish and Norwegian). Then, the acute points out that there is one and only one of the object, which derives from the obsolete spelling(s) een and eet. Some loanwords, mainly from French, are also written with the acute accent, such as Norwegian and Swedish kafé and Danish café (also cafe).
Other diacritics (to use the broader English term usage referenced here) are unusual in Swedish; é is sometimes used to indicate that the stress falls on a terminal syllable containing e, especially when the stress changes the meaning (ide vs. idé, "winter lair" vs. "idea") as well as in some names, like Kastrén; occasionally other acute accents and, less often, grave accents can be seen in names and some foreign words.

Palatalization (phonetics)

palatalizedpalatalizationpalatalisation
When appearing in consonants, it indicates palatalization, similar to the use of the háček in Czech and other Slavic languages (e.g. sześć "six"). A graphically similar, but not identical, mark is indicative of a palatalized sound in several languages.
The Uralic Phonetic Alphabet marks palatalized consonants by an acute accent, as do some Finnic languages using the Latin alphabet, as in Võro.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
French. The acute is used only on é. It is known as accent aigu, in contrast to the accent grave which is the accent sloped the other way. It distinguishes é from è, ê, and e . Unlike other Romance languages, the accent marks do not imply stress in French.
French is written with the 26 letters of the basic Latin script, with four diacritics appearing on vowels (circumflex accent, acute accent, grave accent, diaeresis) and the cedilla appearing in "ç".

Stress (linguistics)

stressstressedunstressed
In Modern Greek, a stress accent has replaced the pitch accent, and the acute marks the stressed syllable of a word.
In Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian dictionaries, stress is indicated with an acute accent on a syllable's vowel (example: вимовля́ння) or, in other editions, an apostrophe just after it (example: гла'сная). Stressing is rare in general texts, but is still used when necessary: compare за́мок (castle) and замо́к (lock). Stress marks are generally used only in materials for foreign learners of the language.

Polish alphabet

Polishaccented charactersdiacritic
In Kashubian and Polish, the acute on "ó", historically used to indicate a lenghthening of "o", now indicates higher pronunciation, and, respectively.
It is based on the Latin alphabet but includes certain letters with diacritics: the kreska or acute accent ; the overdot or kropka ; the tail or ogonek ; and the stroke . The letters q, v and x, which are used only in foreign words, are frequently not considered part of the Polish alphabet.

Vietnamese language

VietnameseVietnamese nameVietnamese-language
In the Quốc Ngữ system for Vietnamese, the Yale romanization for Cantonese and the Pinyin romanization for Mandarin Chinese, the acute accent indicates a rising tone.