Acute accentwikipedia
The acute accent is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.
acute accentacuteĺ´síneadh fadaaccentfadaaccent aiguacutes

Diacritic

diacriticdiacriticsdiacritical mark
The acute accent is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.
Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents.

Apex (diacritic)

apexapices
An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels.
In written Latin, the apex (plural "apices") is a mark with roughly the shape of an acute accent which is placed over vowels to indicate that they are long.

Greek diacritics

polytonicpolytonic orthographymonotonic orthography
The acute accent was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, where it indicated a syllable with a high pitch.
The acute accent (´ ), the circumflex (ˆ ), and the grave accent (` ) indicate different kinds of pitch accent.

Greek alphabet

GreekGreek letterGreek letters
The acute accent is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.
In the polytonic orthography traditionally used for ancient Greek, the stressed vowel of each word carries one of three accent marks: either the acute accent, the grave accent, or the circumflex accent (α̃ or α̑).

Welsh orthography

WelshWelsh alphabet
The acute accent (acen ddyrchafedig), the grave accent (acen ddisgynedig), the circumflex (acen grom, to bach or hirnod) and the diaeresis mark (didolnod) are also used on vowels, but accented letters are not regarded as part of the alphabet.

Grave accent

grave accentgraveù
The grave and circumflex have been replaced with an acute accent in the modern monotonic orthography.

Russian language

RussianRussian-languageRussian:
Stress, which is unpredictable, is not normally indicated orthographically though an optional acute accent may be used to mark stress, such as to distinguish between homographic words, for example замо́к (zamók, meaning a lock) and за́мок (zámok, meaning a castle), or to indicate the proper pronunciation of uncommon words or names.

Spanish orthography

SpanishSpanish for "alphabetspelling
When acute accent and diaeresis marks are used on vowels (,,, and ) they are considered variants of the plain vowel letters, but is considered a separate letter from.

Pitch-accent language

pitch accentpitchpitch-accent language
The acute accent was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, where it indicated a syllable with a high pitch.
In polytonic orthography, accented vowels are marked with the acute accent.

Double acute accent

Ődouble acute accentű
In the 18th century, before Hungarian orthography became fixed, u and o with umlaut + acute were used in some printed documents.

Unicode

unicodeUnicode StandardU
However, for computer use, Unicode conflates the codepoints for these letters with those of the accented Latin letters of similar appearance.
For example, a Latin small letter "i" with an ogonek, a dot above, and an acute accent, which is required in Lithuanian, is represented by the character sequence U+012F, U+0307, U+0301.

Icelandic orthography

IcelandicIcelandic alphabetIcelandic writing system
The Icelandic alphabet is a Latin-script alphabet including some letters duplicated with acute accents; in addition, it includes the letter eth, transliterated as d, and the runic letter thorn, transliterated as th (see picture); Ææ and Öö are considered letters in their own right and not a ligature or diacritical version of their respective letters.

Caron

caronháčekhaček
When appearing in consonants, it indicates palatalization, similar to the use of the háček in Czech and other Slavic languages (e.g. sześć "six").
The name appears in most English dictionaries, but they treat the long mark (acute accent) differently.

Old Norse

NorseOld NorseOld Scandinavian
Long vowels are denoted with acutes.

Polish alphabet

Polishdiacriticset of Polish letters
It is based on the Latin alphabet but includes certain letters with diacritics: the kreska or acute accent ; the overdot or kropka ; the tail or ogonek ; and the stroke .

Lakota language

LakotaLakhotaStandard Lakota Orthography
The vowels are a, e, i, o, u; nasal vowels are aŋ, iŋ, uŋ. Pitch accent is marked with an acute accent: á, é, í, ó, ú, áŋ, íŋ, úŋ on stressed vowels (which receive a higher tone than non-stressed ones)

É

Á

Á
Á, á (a-acute) is a letter of the Blackfoot, Czech, Dutch, Faroese, Galician, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish, Kazakh, Lakota, Navajo, Occitan, Portuguese, Sámi, Slovak, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Welsh languages as a variant of the letter a.

Ó

Ó
Ó, ó (o-acute) is a letter in the Czech, Emilian-Romagnol, Faroese, Hungarian, Icelandic, Kashubian, Kazakh, Polish, Slovak, and Sorbian languages.

Í

iÍı
Í, í (i-acute) is a letter in the Faroese, Hungarian, Icelandic, Czech, Slovak, and Tatar languages, where it often indicates a long /i/ vowel.

Armenian alphabet

ArmenianArmenian scriptՓ
* In the Armenian script emphasis on a word is marked by an acute accent above the word's stressed vowel; it is traditionally grouped with the Armenian question and exclamation marks which are also diacritics applied to the stressed vowel.

Ń

ń
Ń (minuscule: ń) is a letter formed by putting an acute accent over the letter N.

Ć

cĆC#
The grapheme Ć (minuscule: ć), formed from C with the addition of an acute accent, is used in various languages.

Vowel length

vowel lengthlonglong vowel
An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels.

Palatalization (phonetics)

palatalizedpalatalizationpalatalisation
When appearing in consonants, it indicates palatalization, similar to the use of the háček in Czech and other Slavic languages (e.g. sześć "six"). A graphically similar, but not identical, mark is indicative of a palatalized sound in several languages.
The Uralic Phonetic Alphabet marks palatalized consonants by an acute accent, as do some Finnic languages using the Latin alphabet, as in Võro.