Admiral

Adm.admiralsAdmAmiralammiratus ammiratorumfull admiralamiratusAdmiral of the FleetAdmirałVice Admiral
Admiral is one of the highest ranks in some navies, and in many navies is the highest rank.wikipedia
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Vice admiral

Vice-Admiralvice-amiralVAdm
In the Commonwealth and the U.S., a "full" admiral is equivalent to a "full" general in the army, and is above vice admiral and below admiral of the fleet (or fleet admiral).
A vice admiral is typically senior to a rear admiral and junior to an admiral.

Admiral of the fleet

Fleet AdmiralAdmiralFlottenadmiral
In the Commonwealth and the U.S., a "full" admiral is equivalent to a "full" general in the army, and is above vice admiral and below admiral of the fleet (or fleet admiral).
It is usually a rank above admiral (which is now usually the highest rank in peacetime for officers in active service), and is often held by the most senior admiral of an entire naval service.

Four-star rank

four-starGeneralfour-star general
In NATO, admirals have a rank code of OF-9 as a four-star rank.
Four-star officers are often the most senior commanders in the armed services, having ranks such as (full) admiral, (full) general, or air chief marshal.

Emir

amiramirsAmeer
The rank is generally thought to have originated in Sicily from a conflation of أمير البحر, amīr al-baḥr, "prince in Arabic; supervisor in Turkic; (commander) of the sea", with Latin admirabilis ("admirable") or admiratus ("admired"), although alternative etymologies derive the word directly from Latin, or from the Turkish military and naval rank miralay.

Christodulus

ChristodoulosGreco-Arab naval leaders
The term was in use for the Greco-Arab naval leaders of Norman Sicily, which had formerly been ruled by Arabs, at least by the early 11th century.
Christodulus (died 1131) (Χριστόδουλος, Christodoulos, meaning "Slave of Christ;" Arabic: Abd al-Rahman al-Nasrani, meaning "Slave of the All Merciful, the Nazarene [Christ]"), probably either a Greek Orthodox, the name was a common Greek Orthodox name, or a Muslim convert, was the first emir of Palermo (later ammiratus ammiratorum) under the Normans.

Navy

navalnaviesnaval forces
Admiral is one of the highest ranks in some navies, and in many navies is the highest rank. The word "admiral" has today come to be almost exclusively associated with the highest naval rank in most of the world's navies, equivalent to the army rank of (full) general.

Naval officer ranks

NATO rank codeOfficersnaval officer
The word "admiral" has today come to be almost exclusively associated with the highest naval rank in most of the world's navies, equivalent to the army rank of (full) general.

Roger II of Sicily

Roger IIRoger of SicilyKing Roger II
The Norman Roger II of Sicily (1095–1154), employed a Greek Christian known as George of Antioch, who previously had served as a naval commander for several North African Muslim rulers.
(This title later became the English word admiral).

Flag officer

flag rankflag officersflag
The generic term for these naval equivalents of army generals is flag officer.
In the Canadian Forces, a flag officer (French: officier général, "general officer") is an admiral, vice-admiral, rear-admiral, or commodore, the naval equivalent of a general officer of the army or air force.

Laksamana

First Admiral
The Laksamana (Jawi: لقسامان) is a position within the armed forces, similar to the position of admiral in Malay sultanates and in present-day countries like Indonesia and Malaysia.

General officer

GeneralgeneralsGen.
In the Commonwealth and the U.S., a "full" admiral is equivalent to a "full" general in the army, and is above vice admiral and below admiral of the fleet (or fleet admiral). The word "admiral" has today come to be almost exclusively associated with the highest naval rank in most of the world's navies, equivalent to the army rank of (full) general.
In most navies, flag officers are the equivalent of general officers, and the naval rank of admiral is equivalent to the specific army rank of general.

General admiral

GeneraladmiralAdmiral-GeneralGeneral-Admiral
However, this was not always the case; for example, in some European countries prior to the end of World War II, admiral was the third highest naval rank after general admiral and grand admiral.
sv:Amiral#Sveriges amiralgeneraler

Admiralty

British AdmiraltyLord High Admiralthe Admiralty
The Lords Commissioners were always a mixture of admirals, known as Naval Lords or Sea Lords and Civil Lords, normally politicians.

Nebraska Admiral

Admiral in the Great Navy of the State of Nebraskaadmiral in the tongue-in-cheek Nebraska NavyGreat Navy of the State of Nebraska

Miralay

BrigadierColonel
The rank is generally thought to have originated in Sicily from a conflation of أمير البحر, amīr al-baḥr, "prince in Arabic; supervisor in Turkic; (commander) of the sea", with Latin admirabilis ("admirable") or admiratus ("admired"), although alternative etymologies derive the word directly from Latin, or from the Turkish military and naval rank miralay.

Commonwealth of Nations

CommonwealthBritish CommonwealthCommonwealth countries
In the Commonwealth and the U.S., a "full" admiral is equivalent to a "full" general in the army, and is above vice admiral and below admiral of the fleet (or fleet admiral).

Medieval Latin

LatinMiddle LatinMediaeval Latin
The word admiral in Middle English comes from Anglo-French amiral, "commander", from Medieval Latin admiralis, admirallus.

Arabic

Arabic languageArabic-languageArab
These themselves come from Arabic amīr, or amīr al-, "commander of", as in amīr al-baḥr, "commander of the sea".

Norman-Arab-Byzantine culture

Arab-NormanNorman SicilyArab-Norman culture
The term was in use for the Greco-Arab naval leaders of Norman Sicily, which had formerly been ruled by Arabs, at least by the early 11th century.

George of Antioch

The Norman Roger II of Sicily (1095–1154), employed a Greek Christian known as George of Antioch, who previously had served as a naval commander for several North African Muslim rulers.

Abbasid Caliphate

AbbasidAbbasidsAbbasid dynasty
Roger styled George in Abbasid fashion as Amir of Amirs, i.e. "Commander of Commanders", with the title becoming Latinized in the 13th century as ammiratus ammiratorum.

Sicily

SicilianSiciliaSicilians
The Sicilians and later Genoese took the first two parts of the term and used them as one word, amiral, from their Aragon opponents.

Genoa

GenoeseGenovaGenoa, Italy
The Sicilians and later Genoese took the first two parts of the term and used them as one word, amiral, from their Aragon opponents.

Crown of Aragon

AragonAragoneseCrown of Aragón
The Sicilians and later Genoese took the first two parts of the term and used them as one word, amiral, from their Aragon opponents.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The French and Spanish gave their sea commanders similar titles while in Portuguese the word changed to almirante.