A report on Adriatic Sea

Bay of Kotor, a ria in the Southern Adriatic
Gjipe Canyon in southern Albania, where the Adriatic Sea meets the Ionian Sea
Depth of the Adriatic Sea
Schematic layout of Adriatic Sea currents
A submarine spring near Omiš, observed through sea surface rippling
As seen from the map, most of the landmass surrounding the Adriatic sea is classified as Cfa, with the southern region (near the Ionian sea) being Csa.
MOSE Project north of Lido di Venezia
Adriatic Microplate boundaries
Sediment billowing out from Italy's shore into the Adriatic
Pebble beach at Brač island, in the Adriatic Sea within Croatia
Coast of Conero in Italy
Isole Tremiti protected area
Kornati National Park
Karavasta Lagoon in Albania
Pula Arena, one of the six largest surviving Roman amphitheatres
Mosaic of Emperor Justinian and his court, from the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy
The Republic of Venice was a leading maritime power in Europe
Battle of Lissa, 1811
Battle of Lissa, 1866
The last moments of SMS Szent István, hit and sank by the Italian MAS
The Duce Benito Mussolini in a beach of Riccione, in 1932
The town of Izola in the Gulf of Koper, southwestern Slovenia
A Trabucco, old fishing machine typical of Abruzzo region in Italy
Fishing boat in Croatia
Port of Trieste, the largest port in the Adriatic
Rimini is a major seaside tourist resort in Italy
The Barcolana regatta in Trieste, Italy, was named "the greatest sailing race" by the Guinness World Record for its 2,689 boats and over 16,000 sailors on the starting line.<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.sail-world.com/news/218597/Barcolana-the-largest-regatta-in-the-world |title=Barcolana, the largest regatta in the world is presented in London |website=Sail World}}</ref>
View of Ulcinj, Montenegro
The Zlatni Rat (Golden Cape) on the island of Brač
The Palace of the Emperor Diocletian in Split
The coast of Neum, the only town to be situated along Bosnia and Herzegovina's {{convert|20|km|0|abbr=on}} of coastline
Portorož is the largest seaside tourist centre in Slovenia
Port of Durrës, the largest port in Albania
Port of Rijeka, the largest cargo port in Croatia
Port of Koper, the largest port in Slovenia
Port of Trieste, the largest cargo port in the Adriatic
Port of Bar, the largest seaport in Montenegro
Port of Ancona, a large passenger port

Body of water separating the Italian Peninsula from the Illyrian Peninsula.

- Adriatic Sea

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Croatia

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Country at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe.

Country at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe.

The 1st century-built Pula Arena was the sixth largest amphitheatre in the Roman Empire
Kingdom of Croatia c. 925, during the reign of King Tomislav
Coronation of King Tomislav by Oton Iveković
Croatian Ban Nikola Šubić Zrinski is honoured as a national hero for his defence of Szigetvár against the Ottoman Empire
Ban Josip Jelačić at the opening of the first modern Croatian Parliament (Sabor), June 5, 1848. The tricolour flag can be seen in the background.
The Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia was an autonomous kingdom within Austria-Hungary created in 1868 following the Croatian–Hungarian Settlement.
Stjepan Radić, leader of the Croatian Peasant Party who advocated federal organisation of the Yugoslavia, at the assembly in Dubrovnik, 1928
German dictator Adolf Hitler with Quisling and dictator of the Independent State of Croatia Ante Pavelić at the Berghof outside Berchtesgaden, Germany
Cardinal Aloysius Stepinac with the Croatian communist leader Vladimir Bakarić at the celebration of May Day, shortly before Stepinac was arrested by the Communists and taken to court
People of Zagreb celebrating liberation on 12 May 1945 by Croatian Partisans
Josip Broz Tito led SFR Yugoslavia from 1944 to 1980; Pictured: Tito with the US president Richard Nixon in the White House, 1971
The Eternal Flame and 938 marble crosses on the National Memorial Cemetery of Homeland War in Vukovar, commemorates the victims of the Vukovar massacre as one of the symbolic and crucial events in Croatian War of Independence
Croatia became the 28th EU member country on 1 July 2013
Satellite image of Croatia
Bora is a dry, cold wind which blows from the mainland out to sea, whose gusts can reach hurricane strength, particularly in the channel below Velebit, e.g. in the town of Senj
Bottlenose dolphins are protected under Croatian law with Adriatic Dolphin project as the longest ongoing study of a single resident bottlenose dolphin community in the Mediterranean Sea
Wooden trail through nature park Kopački Rit in Osijek-Baranja County
Telašćica Nature Park is one of 444 protected areas of Croatia
Croatian Sabor, parliament's Hall
President Zoran Milanović at the NATO summit on 24 March 2022, Brussels. The accession of Croatia to NATO took place in 2009
Honor guard in the front of Banski Dvori in Zagreb welcoming Pedro Sánchez Prime Minister of Spain and Andrej Plenković Prime Minister of Croatia.
Croatian Air Force and US Navy aircraft participate in multinational training, 2002
Croatian Army forces during “Immediate Response 15”, Military Training Area “Eugen Kvaternik”, Slunj, Croatia, 2015.
Varaždin, capital of Croatia between 1767 and 1776, is the seat of Varaždin county; Pictured: Old Town fortress, one of 15 Croatia's sites inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage tentative list
Croatian counties by GDP (PPS) per capita, 2019
Dubrovnik is one of Croatia's most popular tourist destinations.
Zlatni Rat beach on the Island of Brač is one of the foremost spots of tourism in Croatia
Highway network in Croatia
Pelješac Bridge (under construction), which will connect the peninsula of Pelješac, and through it the southernmost part of Croatia including Dubrovnik, with the Croatian mainland
2011 Croatian population density by county in persons per km2.
Religious believers according to the 2011 census
Map of the Croatian dialects of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina
University of Zagreb is the largest Croatian university and the oldest university in the area covering Central Europe south of Vienna and all of Southeastern Europe (1669)
National and University Library
University Hospital Centre Zagreb
Historic centre of Trogir has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Site since 1997
Trakošćan Castle is one of the best preserved historic buildings in the country
Euphrasian Basilica in Poreč, example of early Byzantine architecture, on the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1997.
Historical nucleus of Split with the 4th-century Diocletian's Palace was inscribed on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1979
Radio Zagreb, now a part of Croatian Radiotelevision, was the first public radio station in Southeast Europe.
Teran wine from Istria region
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Telašćica Nature Park is one of 444 protected areas
Justices of the Constitutional Court of Croatia in 2009
Pelješac Bridge (under construction), which will connect the peninsula of Pelješac, and through it the southernmost part including Dubrovnik, with the Croatian mainland
President Zoran Milanović on NATO summit on 24 March 2022. The accession of Croatia to NATO took place in 2009
Map of the Shtokavian, Chakavian and Kajkavian dialects in Croatia by municipality
A proportional representation of Croatia exports, 2017
HŽ series 6112 manufactured by the Croatian company Končar Group, operated by Croatian Railways
The Baška tablet is the oldest Glagolitic monument in Croatia. It documents the donation of land gifted by Croatian King Dmitar Zvonimir to the Benedictine monastery of St Lucy

It shares a coastline along the Adriatic Sea.

Dalmatia

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One of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia, and Istria.

One of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia, and Istria.

The extent of the Kingdom of Dalmatia (blue) which existed within Austria-Hungary until 1918, on a map of modern-day Croatia and Montenegro
The ancient core of the city of Split, the largest city in Dalmatia, built in and around the Palace of Emperor Diocletian
Rocky beach at Brač island (Croatia), in the Adriatic Sea, during the summer
The historic core of the city of Dubrovnik, in southern Dalmatia
Province of Dalmatia during the Roman Empire
Late Roman provinces
Kingdom of Croatia during the rule of Peter Krešimir IV
Croatia after the Treaty of Zadar
An engraving of the seaward walls of the city of Split by Robert Adam, 1764. The walls were originally built for the Roman Diocletian's Palace.
Map of the Republic of Ragusa, dated 1678
Ottoman Bosnia at its peak territorial extent just before the Morean War in 1684
Dalmatian possessions of the Republic of Venice in 1797
Map of Dalmatia, Croatia, and Sclavonia (Slavonia). Engraved by Weller for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge under the Supervision of Charles Knight, dated January 1, 1852. Dalmatia is the area detailed in the smaller map annexed map on the right.
Austrian linguistic map from 1896. In green the areas where Slavs were the majority of the population, in orange the areas where Istrian Italians and Dalmatian Italians were the majority of the population. The boundaries of Venetian Dalmatia in 1797 are delimited with blue dots.
The Seagull Wings monument in Podgora, dedicated to the fallen sailors of the Yugoslav Partisan Navy

Dalmatia is a narrow belt of the east shore of the Adriatic Sea, stretching from the island of Rab in the north to the Bay of Kotor in the south.

Trieste

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City and seaport in northeastern Italy.

City and seaport in northeastern Italy.

Satellite view of Trieste
Seven sections of Trieste
Remains of a Roman arch in Trieste's Old City
Trieste in the 17th century, in a contemporary image by the Carniolan historian Johann Weikhard von Valvasor
Palazzo Carciotti in Trieste, circa 1850
The Stock Exchange Square in 1854
Stock market in Trieste today
A view of Trieste in 1885
Yugoslav Army entering Trieste (the caption reads "Tito's Army liberated Trieste")
A postage stamp issued by the Italian Social Republic with a Yugoslav liberation overprint
Trieste and Zone A/B
Cheering crowd for the return of Trieste to Italy on November 4, 1954
Government palace
Trieste City Hall
Port of Trieste
One of many coffee sacks that are traded by a Trieste company.
Research institutions such as the International Center for Theoretical Physics (logo), SISSA and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics are located in Trieste around Barcola.
Professional fisherman's boat in Barcola, a suburb of Trieste
Trieste seafront
Piazza Unità d'Italia
Piazza Unità d'Italia by night
From left to right: Barcolana near the Victory Lighthouse, a part of the harbour, a street of the Old City
Miramare Castle
Trieste Cathedral dedicated to Justus of Trieste
Serbian Orthodox Saint Spyridon Church, mid 19th century
The city's old stock exchange
The Ponterosso Square
Piazza Venezia
View of Barcola from the Vittoria Lighthouse
Libreria Antiquaria Umberto Saba
Church of San Nicolò dei Greci
James Joyce, Umberto Saba and their friends were guests of the still existing Caffè Stella Polare.
Caffe degli Specchi was opened in 1839 in Trieste
The Porto Vecchio, also showing Trieste Centrale railway station
Trieste Centrale railway station
A car of the Opicina Tramway
Scooters are heavily used in personal transport in Trieste
View of Trieste

Trieste is located at the head of the Gulf of Trieste, on a narrow strip of Italian territory lying between the Adriatic Sea and Slovenia; Slovenia lies approximately 8 km east and 10–15 km southeast of the city, while Croatia is about 30 km to the south of the city.

Albania

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Country in Southeastern Europe.

Country in Southeastern Europe.

The remains of Kamenica Tumulus in the county of Korçë.
Founded in the 4th century BC, Scodra was a significant city of the Illyrian tribes of the Ardiaei and Labeates.
Apollonia was an important Ancient Greek colony on the Illyrian coast along the Adriatic Sea and one of the western points of the Via Egnatia route, that connected Rome and Constantinople.
The town of Krujë was the capital of the Principality of Arbanon in the Middle Ages.
Ismail Qemali is regarded as the founding father of the modern Albanian nation.
Zog I was the first and only king of Albania; his reign lasted 11 years (1928–1939).
Enver Hoxha served as Prime Minister and First Secretary of the Party of Labour of Albania.
A bunker overlooking the Albanian Alps. By 1983, approximately 173,371 concrete bunkers were scattered across the country.
In 1988, the first foreigners were allowed to walk into the car-free Skanderbeg Square in Tirana.
The earthquake of November 2019 was the strongest to hit Albania in more than four decades.
The Albanian Alps are an extension and simultaneously the highest section of the Dinaric Alps.
Gjipe is located on the confluence of the Adriatic and Ionian Sea.
Panorma Bay on the Albanian Riviera in the south has a mediterranean climate.
The Albanian Alps in the north have a subarctic climate.
The golden eagle is the national symbol and animal of Albania.
The common bottlenose dolphin is a frequent visitor to the waters of the Albanian Adriatic and Ionian Sea Coasts.
The Lagoon of Karavasta within the Divjakë-Karavasta National Park is renowned for hosting the rare Dalmatian pelican.
Assisted by the governments of Kosovo and Albania, an official application for the inclusion of the Arbëreshë people in the list of UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage is being prepared.
Albanian soldiers in the Province of Kandahar, Afghanistan.
GPD per capita development of Albanien since 1913
Tirana is the economic hub of the country. It is home to major domestic and foreign companies operating in the country.
Grapes in Berat. Due to the mediterranean climate, wine, olives and citrus fruits are mostly produced in Southern Albania.
The Antea factory in Fushë-Krujë
The Islets of Ksamil in the south of the Albanian Ionian Sea Coast.
Rruga e Kombit connects the Adriatic Sea across the Western Lowlands with the Albanian Alps.
Tirana International Airport is named in honour of the Albanian nun and missionary Mother Teresa.
The University of Arts is the largest higher education institute dedicated to the study of arts.
The Albanian cuisine from the Mediterranean, which is characterised by the use of fruits, vegetables and olive oil, contributes to the good nutrition of the country's population.
Electricity production in Albania from 1980 to 2019.
Lake Koman was formed as a result of the construction of the Koman Hydroelectric Power Station in 1985.
Development of the population of Albania over the last sixty years.
The dialects of the Albanian language in Albania.
Representatives of the Sunni, Orthodox, Bektashi and Catholic Albanian communities and in Paris.
The double-headed eagle on the walls of the St. Anthony Church.
Butrint has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 1992.
The Codices of Berat are eminently important for the global community and the development of ancient biblical, liturgical and hagiographical literature. In 2005, it was inscribed on the UNESCO's Memory of the World Register.
Bukë misri (cornbread) is a staple on the Albanian table.
Speca të ferguara (roasted peppers) served with pite, a traditional and prominent layered Albanian pie.
The former grounds of the headquarters of Radio Tirana in the capital of Tirana. Radio Televizioni Shqiptar (RTSH) was initially inaugurated as Radio Tirana in 1938 prior to the World War II.
Albanian iso-polyphony is designated as an UNESCO Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.
The Albanian Dancer (1835) by French artist Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps; the dancers are depicted wearing the fustanella, the national costume of Albania
An excerpt from the Meshari (The Missal) written by Gjon Buzuku. (1555)
Parashqevi Qiriazi - teacher and feminist (1880–1970)
Arena Kombëtare in central Tirana

It is located on the Adriatic and Ionian Seas within the Mediterranean Sea and shares land borders with Montenegro to the northwest, Kosovo to the northeast, North Macedonia to the east and Greece to the south.

Italy

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Country that consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and several islands surrounding it; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region.

Country that consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and several islands surrounding it; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region.

Expansion of the territory called "Italy" from ancient Greece until Diocletian
The Iron Crown of Lombardy, for centuries a symbol of the Kings of Italy
Marco Polo, explorer of the 13th century, recorded his 24 years-long travels in the Book of the Marvels of the World, introducing Europeans to Central Asia and China.
The Italian states before the beginning of the Italian Wars in 1494
Leonardo da Vinci, the quintessential Renaissance man, in a self-portrait (ca. 1512, Royal Library, Turin)
Christopher Columbus leads an expedition to the New World, 1492. His voyages are celebrated as the discovery of the Americas from a European perspective, and they opened a new era in the history of humankind and sustained contact between the two worlds.
Flag of the Cispadane Republic, which was the first Italian tricolour adopted by a sovereign Italian state (1797)
Holographic copy of 1847 of Il Canto degli Italiani, the Italian national anthem since 1946
Animated map of the Italian unification from 1829 to 1871
The Victor Emmanuel II Monument in Rome, a national symbol of Italy celebrating the first king of the unified country, and resting place of the Italian Unknown Soldier since the end of World War I. It was inaugurated in 1911, on the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Unification of Italy.
The fascist dictator Benito Mussolini titled himself Duce and ruled the country from 1922 to 1943.
Areas controlled by the Italian Empire at its peak
Italian partisans in Milan during the Italian Civil War, April 1945
Alcide De Gasperi, first republican Prime Minister of Italy and one of the Founding Fathers of the European Union
The signing ceremony of the Treaty of Rome on 25 March 1957, creating the European Economic Community, forerunner of the present-day European Union
Funerals of the victims of the Bologna bombing of 2 August 1980, the deadliest attack ever perpetrated in Italy during the Years of Lead
Italian government task force to face the COVID-19 emergency
Topographic map of Italy
Dolphins in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the Aeolian Islands
National and regional parks in Italy
Gran Paradiso, established in 1922, is the oldest Italian national park.
The Italian wolf, the national animal of Italy
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map of Italy
The Chamber of Deputies is the lower house of Italy.
The Supreme Court of Cassation, Rome
An Alfa Romeo 159 vehicle of the Carabinieri corps
Group photo of the G7 leaders at the 43rd G7 summit in Taormina
Heraldic coat of arms of the Italian Armed Forces
A proportional representation of Italy exports, 2019
Milan is the economic capital of Italy, and is a global financial centre and a fashion capital of the world.
A Carrara marble quarry
The Autostrada dei Laghi ("Lakes Motorway"), the first motorway built in the world
FS' Frecciarossa 1000 high speed train, with a maximum speed of 400 km/h
Trieste, the main port of the northern Adriatic and starting point of the Transalpine Pipeline
ENI is considered one of the world's oil and gas "Supermajors".
Solar panels in Piombino. Italy is one of the world's largest producers of renewable energy.
Galileo Galilei, the father of modern science, physics and astronomy
Enrico Fermi, creator of the world's first first nuclear reactor
The Amalfi Coast is one of Italy's major tourist destinations.
Map of Italy's population density at the 2011 census
Italy is home to a large population of migrants from Eastern Europe and North Africa.
Linguistic map showing the languages spoken in Italy
Vatican City, the Holy See's sovereign territory
Bologna University, established in AD 1088, is the world's oldest academic institution.
Olive oil and vegetables are central to the Mediterranean diet.
Carnival of Venice
The Last Supper (1494–1499), Leonardo da Vinci, Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan
Michelangelo's David (1501–1504), Galleria dell'Accademia, Florence
The Birth of Venus (1484–1486), Sandro Botticelli, Uffizi Gallery, Florence
Dante shown holding a copy of the Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the mount of Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino's fresco, 1465
Niccolò Machiavelli, founder of modern political science and ethics
Pinocchio is one of the world's most translated books and a canonical piece of children's literature.
Clockwise from top left: Thomas Aquinas, proponent of natural theology and the Father of Thomism; Giordano Bruno, one of the major scientific figures of the Western world; Cesare Beccaria, considered the Father of criminal justice and modern criminal law; and Maria Montessori, credited with the creation of the Montessori education
La Scala opera house
Statues of Pantalone and Harlequin, two stock characters from the Commedia dell'arte, in the Museo Teatrale alla Scala
Dario Fo, one of the most widely performed playwrights in modern theatre, received international acclaim for his highly improvisational style.
Giacomo Puccini, Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Turandot, are among the most frequently worldwide performed in the standard repertoire
Luciano Pavarotti, considered one of the finest tenors of the 20th century and the "King of the High Cs"
Giorgio Moroder, pioneer of Italo disco and electronic dance music, is known as the "Father of disco".
Entrance to Cinecittà in Rome
The Azzurri in 2012. Football is the most popular sport in Italy.
Starting in 1909, the Giro d'Italia is the Grands Tours' second oldest.
A Ferrari SF21 by Scuderia Ferrari, the most successful Formula One team
Prada shop at Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan
The traditional recipe for spaghetti with tomato and basil sauce
Italian wine and salumi
The Frecce Tricolori, with the smoke trails representing the national colours of Italy, during the celebrations of the Festa della Repubblica
The Venice Film Festival is the oldest film festival in the world.

Including the islands, Italy has a coastline and border of 7600 km on the Adriatic, Ionian, Tyrrhenian seas (740 km), and borders shared with France (488 km), Austria (430 km), Slovenia (232 km) and Switzerland (740 km).

Republic of Venice

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Sovereign state and maritime republic in parts of present-day Italy (mainly northeastern Italy) which existed for 1100 years from 697 AD until 1797 AD. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, it incorporated numerous overseas possessions in modern Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Greece, Albania and Cyprus.

Sovereign state and maritime republic in parts of present-day Italy (mainly northeastern Italy) which existed for 1100 years from 697 AD until 1797 AD. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, it incorporated numerous overseas possessions in modern Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Greece, Albania and Cyprus.

The Republic of Venice in 1789
The Doge of Venice, illustrated in the manuscript Théâtre de tous les peuples et nations de la terre avec leurs habits et ornemens divers, tant anciens que modernes, diligemment depeints au naturel. Painted by Lucas d'Heere in the 2nd half of the 16th century. Preserved by the Ghent University Library.
The Republic of Venice in 1789
The Venetia c 600 AD
The Venetia c 840 AD
Map of the Venetian Republic, circa 1000
Procession in St Mark's Square by Gentile Bellini in 1496
Leonardo Loredan, Doge of Venice during the War of the League of Cambrai.
The Venetian fort of Palamidi in Nafplion, Greece, one of many forts that secured Venetian trade routes in the Eastern Mediterranean.
Greater coat of arms of the Republic, with its various possessions and claims, in the aftermath of the Morean War
The Republic of Venice around 1700
Drawing of the Doge's Palace, late 14th century
The governmental structure of the Venetian Republic
The hearing given by the Doge in the Sala del Collegio in Doge's Palace by Francesco Guardi, 1775–80
The Flag of Veneto.
Siege of Tyre (1124) in the Holy Land
Siege of Constantinople (1203)
Voyage of Marco Polo into the Far East during the Pax Mongolica
The Piraeus Lion in Venice, in front of the Venetian Arsenal
Relief of the Venetian Lion on the Landward Gate in Zara (Zadar), capital of the Venetian Dalmatia
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Parenzo (Poreč)
Vicenza, Piazza dei Signori.
Udine, Piazza Libertà.
Piazza delle Erbe, Verona
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Cattaro (Kotor)
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Candia (Heraklion)
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Frangokastello, Crete
Venetian blazon with the Lion of Saint Mark, as frequently found on the New Fortress walls, Corfu.
The sack of Constantinople in 1204 on a mosaic in the San Giovanni Evangelista church in Ravenna, 1213

Venice achieved territorial conquests along the Adriatic Sea.

Split, Croatia

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Second-largest city of Croatia, the largest city in Dalmatia and the largest city on the Croatian coast.

Second-largest city of Croatia, the largest city in Dalmatia and the largest city on the Croatian coast.

Reconstruction of the Palace of the Roman Emperor Diocletian in its original appearance upon completion in 305, by Ernest Hébrard
The Peristyle of Diocletian's Palace, collotype (1909).
Statue of bishop Gregory of Nin, in the Giardin Park
The Riva of Split in the 19th century, with Marjan hill in the background.
City center and the Riva promenade from the slopes of Marjan in 1910.
Italian warship in the City Harbour after the annexation into Italy in 1941.
German vehicles in the city streets. The sign reads "Death to fascism – freedom to the people".
The Yugoslav-era Coat of arms of Split. Introduced in 1967, it was based on the Medieval rectangular arms, dating at least from the 14th century (and likely much earlier).
Marjan hill as seen from the Riva Promenade, 2013.
Panorama view of Split and surroundings from atop the Marjan
Split and the surrounding satellite towns, as seen from space.
Suburbs of Split after July 2017 forest fire
Snow is rare in Split.
A "Morlach" (Vlaj) peasant in Split, 1864.
Juice carrier sitting on a slipway at Brodosplit
Split University Library
View of Diocletian's Palace
The Prokurative, dating to the brief rule of the French Empire
The Croatian National Theatre in Split, built in 1893
Split Archaeological Museum
Ante Žižić, who has played in the NBA, is from Split
Poljud Stadium, commissioned for the 1979 Mediterranean Games
Spaladium Arena
Split-born US Marine Major Louis Cukela (Čukela), one of 19 two-time recipients of the Medal of Honor.
Ante Žižić, who has played in the NBA, is from Split

It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea and is spread over a central peninsula and its surroundings.

Istria

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Borders and roads in Istria
The Sečovlje Saltworks in northern Istria were probably started in antiquity and were first mentioned in 804 in the report on Placitum of Riziano.
Austrian Littoral in 1897
Map of Istria and Dalmatia with the ancient domains of the Republic of Venice (indicated in fuchsia. Dashed diagonally, the territories that belonged occasionally)
Location map of Slovenian Istria
Percentage of native Italian speakers (Istrian Italians) in Croatia's Istria County in 2001
Percentage of people who used Italian as a "language of daily use" in Istria (Istrian Italians) in 1910
Aerial picture of Pula (Croatia)
The promenade of Poreč (Croatia)
Rovinj, as seen from the bell tower of the church of Saint Eufemia (Croatia)
Motovun (Croatia)
Lim canal (Croatia)
The Praetorian Palace in Koper (Slovenia)
Old town of Piran (Slovenia)
Port in Muggia (Italy)
Traditional folk costume of Istrian Croats
Vineyards of Istria
Changes to the Italian eastern border from 1920 to 1975.
The Austrian Littoral, later renamed Julian March, which was assigned to Italy in 1920 with the Treaty of Rapallo (with adjustments of its border in 1924 after the Treaty of Rome) and which was then ceded to Yugoslavia in 1947 with the Treaty of Paris
Areas annexed to Italy in 1920 and remained Italian even after 1947
Areas annexed to Italy in 1920, passed to the Free Territory of Trieste in 1947 with the Paris treaties and definitively assigned to Italy in 1975 with the Treaty of Osimo
Areas annexed to Italy in 1920, passed to the Free Territory of Trieste in 1947 with the Paris treaties and definitively assigned to Yugoslavia in 1975 with the Osimo treaty

Istria (Croatian and Slovene: Istra; Istriot: Eîstria; Istro-Romanian, Italian and Venetian: Istria; formerly Histria in Latin and Ἴστρια in Ancient Greek) is the largest peninsula within the Adriatic Sea.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

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Country at the crossroads of south and southeast Europe, located in the Balkans.

Country at the crossroads of south and southeast Europe, located in the Balkans.

Iron Age cult carriage from Banjani, near Sokolac
Mogorjelo, ancient Roman suburban Villa Rustica from the 4th century, near Čapljina
Hval's Codex, illustrated Slavic manuscript from medieval Bosnia
Bosnia in the Middle Ages spanning the Banate of Bosnia and the succeeding Kingdom of Bosnia
Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque in Sarajevo, dating from 1531
Austro-Hungarian troops enter Sarajevo, 1878
The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg in Sarajevo, by Gavrilo Princip
"Keep/Protect Yugoslavia" (Čuvajte Jugoslaviju), a variant of the alleged last words of King Alexander I, in an illustration of Yugoslav peoples dancing the kolo
The railway bridge over the Neretva River in Jablanica, twice destroyed during the 1943 Case White offensive
Eternal flame memorial to military and civilian World War II victims in Sarajevo
Bosnia and Herzegovina's flag while part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Dissolution of Yugoslavia
The Executive Council Building burns after being struck by tank fire during the Siege of Sarajevo, 1992
Tuzla government building burning after anti-government clashes on 7 February 2014
Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (FBiH), Republika Srpska (RS) and Brčko District (BD)
Estimated development of real GDP per capita of Bosnia and Herzegovina, since 1952
Proportional diagram of Bosnia and Herzegovina exports as of 2019
The Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Sarajevo
Apron view of the Sarajevo International Airport
University of Sarajevo's Faculty of Law
National and University Library in Sarajevo
Radio and Television of Bosnia and Herzegovina headquarters in Sarajevo
Stećci from Radimlja, near Stolac (13th century)
Bosniaks dancing a traditional kolo
Serbs from Bosanska Krajina in traditional clothing
Bosnian meat platter that contains, among other things, ćevapi, which is considered the national dish of Bosnia and Herzegovina
The Asim Ferhatović Hase Stadium in Sarajevo hosted the opening ceremony of the 1984 Winter Olympics.
Edin Džeko, captain of the Bosnian national football team
Neum, Bosnian and Herzegovinan only town on the Adriatic

In the south it has a narrow coast on the Adriatic Sea within the Mediterranean, which is about 20 km long and surrounds the town of Neum.

Slovenia

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Country in Central Europe.

Country in Central Europe.

Roman Emona's south wall (reconstruction) in present-day Ljubljana
The Prince's Stone, symbol of the Duchy of Carantania
A depiction of an ancient democratic ritual of Slovene-speaking tribes, which took place on the Prince's Stone in Slovene until 1414
The Ottoman army battling the Habsburgs in present-day Slovenia during the Great Turkish War
The Battles of the Isonzo took place mostly in rugged mountainous areas above the Soča River.
The proclamation of the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs at Congress Square in Ljubljana on 20 October 1918
The map showing the present territory of Slovenia, with traditional regional boundaries; the Slovene-speaking areas annexed by Italy after WWI are shown in stripes
Partisans fighting for Trieste and Primorje region, 1945
Adolf Hitler and Martin Bormann visiting Maribor in April 1941
Josip Broz Tito and Edvard Kardelj (left) in Dražgoše, Slovenia, 1977.
Slovenian Territorial Defense Units counterattacking the Yugoslav National Army tank who entered Slovenia during the Ten-Day War, 1991
A topographic map of Slovenia
Mount Mangart, in the Julian Alps, is the third-highest peak in Slovenia, after Triglav and Škrlatica.
Solution runnels (also known as rillenkarren) are a karst feature on the Karst Plateau, as in many other karst areas of the world.
Slovenian coast with cliffs
Climate types of Slovenia 1970–2000 and climographs for selected settlements.
Lake Bohinj, largest Slovenian lake, one of the two springs of the Sava River
Olm can be found in the Postojna cave and other caves in the country.
The Carniolan honey bee is native to Slovenia and is a subspecies of the western honey bee.
Modern Lipizzaner grazing
The Government Building and President's Office in Ljubljana
President Borut Pahor
Eurocopter Cougar of the Slovenian Army
Statistical regions: 1. Gorizia, 2. Upper Carniola, 3. Carinthia, 4. Drava, 5. Mura, 6. Central Slovenia, 7. Central Sava, 8. Savinja, 9. Coastal–Karst, 10. Inner Carniola–Karst, 11. Southeast Slovenia, 12. Lower Sava
Since 2007 Slovenia has been part of the Eurozone (dark blue)
GDP per capita development in Slovenia
A proportional representation of Slovenia exports, 2019
Loan-deposit ratio in Slovenia by years – including the 2005–2008 Boom Period
A graphical depiction of Slovenia's product exports in 28 color-coded categories.
Postojna Cave
Old town of Piran on Slovenian coast
Lake Bled with its island
Motorways in Slovenia in August 2020
Pendolino ETR 310 tilting train of Slovenian railways in Ljubljana Central train station
The Ljubljana Jože Pučnik Airport is the biggest international airport in the country
Population density in Slovenia by municipality. The four main urban areas are visible: Ljubljana and Kranj (centre), Maribor (northeast) and the Slovene Istria (southwest).
Front cover of a bilingual passport in Slovene and Italian
The National Shrine Mary Help of Christians at Brezje.
University of Ljubljana administration building
University of Maribor administration building
The Sower (1907), by the Impressionist painter Ivan Grohar, became a metaphor for Slovenes and was a reflection of the transition from a rural to an urban culture.
Potica as part of traditional Slovenian Easter breakfast
The more-than-400-year-old Žametovka vine growing outside the Old Vine House in Maribor, Slovenia. To the right of the vine is a daughter vine taken from a cutting of the old vine.
France Prešeren, best-known Slovenian poet
"Zdravljica" (A Toast; part) with rejection mark from Austrian censorship (due to potential revolutionary content); the music of Zdravljica is now the Slovenian national anthem.
Folk musician Lojze Slak
The industrial group Laibach
The National Theatre in Ljubljana
The sculpture of the poet Valentin Vodnik (1758–1819) was created by Alojz Gangl in 1889 as part of Vodnik Monument, the first Slovene national monument.
Smrekar's illustration of Martin Krpan
Alpine skier Tina Maze, a double Olympic gold medalist and the overall winner of the 2012–13 World Cup season
Postojna Cave
Old town of Piran on Slovenian coast
Lake Bled with its island

It is bordered by Italy to the west, Austria to the north, Hungary to the northeast, Croatia to the southeast, and the Adriatic Sea to the southwest.