A report on VicenzaPaduaAdriatic Veneti and Veneto

Groups within the Italian peninsula in the Iron Age. Veneti are in brown.
Piazza dei Signori
Basilica Palladiana
Remnants of Padua's Roman amphitheatre wall
Venice, the primary tourist destination and the capital of Veneto
Piazza dei Signori
The Botanical Garden of Padova today; in the background, the Basilica of Sant'Antonio
Lake Alleghe near Belluno
Basilica Palladiana with clock tower
Tomb of Antenor
Cortina d'Ampezzo
A night view of the Basilica Palladiana
The unfinished façade of Padua Cathedral
The Piave River
The three-dimensional stage of the Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza
Clock tower and Lion of St. Mark, symbol of the Serenissima Repubblic
The Venetian Lagoon at sunset
Palazzo Thiene Bonin Longare, designed by Palladio and built by Vincenzo Scamozzi
Last Judgment by Giotto, part of the Scrovegni Chapel.
Relief map of Veneto
Porta Castello Tower
Palazzo della Ragione
The Adige in Verona
Plaque for Vicenza in the UNESCO World Heritage List
Botanical Garden (Orto Botanico).
The Tetrarchs were the four co-rulers who governed the Roman Empire as long as Diocletian's reform lasted. Here they are portrayed embracing, in a posture of harmony, in a porphyry sculpture dating from the 4th century, produced in Anatolia, located today on a corner of St Mark's Basilica in Venice.
A plate of Baccalà alla vicentina, a typical dish of the city
Street tram in Padua
The Horses of Saint Mark, brought as loot from Constantinople in 1204.
This tempera, Two Christians before the Judges, hangs in the city's Cathedral.
An 18th-century view of Venice by Canaletto.
The apse area of Santa Sofia.
The 13th-century Castel Brando in Cison di Valmarino, Treviso.
The "Gran Guardia" loggia
Veneto's provinces.
Prato della Valle (detail)
St Mark's Basilica, the seat of the Patriarch of Venice.
Loggia Amulea, as seen from Prato della Valle
The Punta San Vigilio on the Lake Garda
Torre degli Anziani as seen from Piazza della Frutta
Kiss of Judas by Giotto, in Padua.
The Astronomical clock as seen from Piazza dei Signori
Giorgione's The Tempest.
The Prato della Valle in Padua, a work of Italian Renaissance architecture.
Villa Cornaro.
Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Love's Kiss.
The Church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice
A Golden bottle of Prosecco
Asiago cheese and crackers
A slice of tiramisù
Antonio Salieri
Antonio Vivaldi
Teatro La Fenice
The Arena of Verona
Teatro Salieri
Villa Barbaro
The Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Villa Badoer
Villa Malcontenta
Villa Pisani (Bagnolo)
The mount Antelao
Lastoi de Formin (Cadore)
The start of Strada delle 52 Gallerie
A trait that shows the structure of the Calà del Sasso

Padua (Padova ; Pàdova) is a city and comune in Veneto, northern Italy.

- Padua

The Veneti (also Heneti) were an Indo-European people who inhabited northeastern Italy, in an area corresponding to the modern-day region of Veneto.

- Adriatic Veneti

It is in the Veneto region at the northern base of the Monte Berico, where it straddles the Bacchiglione River.

- Vicenza

Padua stands on the Bacchiglione River, 40 km west of Venice and 29 km southeast of Vicenza.

- Padua

Vicentia was settled by the Italic Euganei tribe and then by the Paleo-Veneti tribe in the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC. The Romans allied themselves with the Paleo-Veneti in their fight against the Celtic tribes that populated north-western Italy.

- Vicenza

It included cities of the modern Veneto such as Este, Padua, Vicenza, Asolo, Oderzo, Montebelluna, Vittorio Veneto, Cadore, as well as other areas around the Po Delta.

- Adriatic Veneti

The citizens of Vicetia received Roman citizenship and were inscribed into the Roman tribe Romilia in 49 BC. The city was known for its agriculture, brickworks, marble quarry, and wool industry and had some importance as a way-station on the important road from Mediolanum (Milan) to Aquileia, near Tergeste (Trieste), but it was overshadowed by its neighbor Patavium (Padua).

- Vicenza

After the Fall of Troy, Antenor led a group of Trojans and their Paphlagonian allies, the Eneti or Veneti, who lost their king Pylaemenes to settle the Euganean plain in Italy.

- Padua

According to ancient historians, who perhaps wanted to link Venetic origins to legend of Roman origins in Troy, the Veneti (often called the Palaeoveneti) came from Paphlagonia in Anatolia at the time of the Fall of Troy (12th century BC), led by prince Antenor, a comrade of Aeneas.

- Veneto

Este, Padua, Oderzo, Adria, Vicenza, Verona, and Altino became centres of Venetic culture.

- Veneto

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