Advaita Vedantawikipedia
Advaita Vedanta (अद्वैत वेदान्त, IAST: ', literally, "not-two"), originally known as Puruṣavāda''', is a school of Hindu philosophy and religious practice, and one of the classic Indian paths to spiritual realization.
advaitaAdvaita VedāntaAdvaitinadvaiticnondualismVedantismAdvaita philosophyVedantaadvaitic school of Hindu philosophyadvaitha

Monism

monismmonisticmonist
Advaita Vedanta (अद्वैत वेदान्त, IAST: ', literally, "not-two"), originally known as Puruṣavāda''', is a school of Hindu philosophy and religious practice, and one of the classic Indian paths to spiritual realization. Many scholars describe it as a form of monism, others describe the Advaita philosophy as non-dualistic.
In modern Hinduism, the term "absolute monism" is being used for Advaita Vedanta.

Adi Shankara

ShankaraSankaraAdi Shankara
Advaita Vedanta is the oldest extant sub-school of Vedanta, which is one of the six orthodox (āstika) Hindu philosophies . Although its roots trace back to the 1st millennium BCE, the most prominent exponent of the Advaita Vedanta is considered by the tradition to be 8th century scholar Adi Shankara.
Adi Shankara (pronounced ) or Shankara, was an early 8th century Indian philosopher and theologian who consolidated the doctrine of Advaita Vedanta.

Nondualism

nondualismnon-dualnonduality
Many scholars describe it as a form of monism, others describe the Advaita philosophy as non-dualistic.
While the term "nondualism" is derived from Advaita Vedanta, descriptions of nondual consciousness can be found within Hinduism (Turiya, sahaja), Buddhism (Buddha-nature, rigpa, shentong), and western Christian and neo-Platonic traditions (henosis, mystical union).

Jivanmukta

jivanmuktajivanmuktifully liberated yogi
Advaita Vedanta emphasizes Jivanmukti, the idea that moksha (freedom, liberation) is achievable in this life in contrast to Indian philosophies that emphasize videhamukti, or moksha after death.
A jivan mukta or mukta is someone who, in the Advaita Vedanta philosophy of Hinduism, has gained and assimilated infinite and divine knowledge and power and gained complete self-knowledge and self-realisation and attained Kaivalya (enlightenment), thus is liberated with an inner sense of freedom while living and not yet died.

Neo-Vedanta

neo-Hinduismneo-Vedantaneo-Vedantic
In modern times, its views appear in various Neo-Vedanta movements.
Some scholars argue that these modern interpretations incorporate western ideas into traditional Indian religions, especially Advaita Vedanta, which is asserted as central or fundamental to Hindu culture.

Vedanta

VedanticvedantaVedānta
Advaita Vedanta is the oldest extant sub-school of Vedanta, which is one of the six orthodox (āstika) Hindu philosophies . Although its roots trace back to the 1st millennium BCE, the most prominent exponent of the Advaita Vedanta is considered by the tradition to be 8th century scholar Adi Shankara.
Rather it is an umbrella term for many sub-traditions, ranging from dualism to non-dualism, all of which developed on the basis of a common textual connection called the Prasthanatrayi.

Brahman

brahmanBrahmBrahma
The term Advaita refers to its idea that the soul (true Self, Atman) is the same as the highest metaphysical Reality (Brahman).
In non-dual schools such as the Advaita Vedanta, Brahman is identical to the Atman, is everywhere and inside each living being, and there is connected spiritual oneness in all existence.

Puranas

Puranicpuranaspurana
Advaita influenced and was influenced by various traditions and texts of Hindu philosophies such as Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, other sub-schools of Vedanta, Vaishnavism, Shaivism, the Puranas, the Agamas, as well as social movements such as the Bhakti movement.
The Puranic literature wove with the Bhakti movement in India, and both Dvaita and Advaita scholars have commented on the underlying Vedantic themes in the Maha Puranas.

Bhagavad Gita

GitaBhagavad GītāGeeta
It gives "a unifying interpretation of the whole body of Upanishads", the Brahma Sutras, and the Bhagavad Gita.
Vedanta commentators read varying relations between Self and Brahman in the text: Advaita Vedanta sees the non-dualism of Atman (soul) and Brahman as its essence, whereas Bhedabheda and Vishishtadvaita see Atman and Brahman as both different and non-different, and Dvaita sees them as different.

Bhakti movement

bhakti movementbhaktiBhakti era
Advaita influenced and was influenced by various traditions and texts of Hindu philosophies such as Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, other sub-schools of Vedanta, Vaishnavism, Shaivism, the Puranas, the Agamas, as well as social movements such as the Bhakti movement.
The movement was inspired by many poet-saints, who championed a wide range of philosophical positions ranging from theistic dualism of Dvaita to absolute monism of Advaita Vedanta.

Shaivism

ShaivaShaiviteSaivite
Advaita influenced and was influenced by various traditions and texts of Hindu philosophies such as Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, other sub-schools of Vedanta, Vaishnavism, Shaivism, the Puranas, the Agamas, as well as social movements such as the Bhakti movement.
Shaivism has a vast literature with different philosophical schools, ranging from nondualism, dualism, and mixed schools.

Hinduism

HinduHindushinduism
Advaita Vedanta (अद्वैत वेदान्त, IAST: ', literally, "not-two"), originally known as Puruṣavāda''', is a school of Hindu philosophy and religious practice, and one of the classic Indian paths to spiritual realization.
The major kinds, according to McDaniel are, Folk Hinduism, based on local traditions and cults of local deities and is the oldest, non-literate system; Vedic Hinduism based on the earliest layers of the Vedas traceable to 2nd millennium BCE; Vedantic Hinduism based on the philosophy of the Upanishads, including Advaita Vedanta, emphasizing knowledge and wisdom; Yogic Hinduism, following the text of Yoga Sutras of Patanjali emphasizing introspective awareness; Dharmic Hinduism or "daily morality", which McDaniel states is stereotyped in some books as the "only form of Hindu religion with a belief in karma, cows and caste"; and Bhakti or devotional Hinduism, where intense emotions are elaborately incorporated in the pursuit of the spiritual.

Vaishnavism

VaishnavaVaishnaviteVaishnavaite
Advaita influenced and was influenced by various traditions and texts of Hindu philosophies such as Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, other sub-schools of Vedanta, Vaishnavism, Shaivism, the Puranas, the Agamas, as well as social movements such as the Bhakti movement.
Vaishnavism in the 8th century came into contact with the Advaita doctrine of Adi Shankara.

Vivekachudamani

VivekachoodamaniVivekacūḍāmaṇiVivekachudamani
It is described in classical Advaita books like Shankara's Upadesasahasri and the Vivekachudamani, which is also attributed to Shankara.
The Vivekachudamani (Sanskrit: विवेकचूडामणि) is an introductory treatise within the Advaita Vedanta tradition of Hinduism.

Nididhyāsana

nididhyasananididhyāsana
While Shankara emphasized sravana ("hearing"), manana ("reflection") and nididhyasana ("repeated meditation"), later texts like the Dŗg-Dŗśya-Viveka (14th century) and Vedantasara (of Sadananda) (15th century) added samadhi as a means to liberation, a theme that was also emphasized by Swami Vivekananda.
In Advaita Vedanta and Jnana Yoga Nididhyasana (Sanskrit: निदिध्यासन) is profound and repeated meditation on the mahavakyas, great Upanishadic statements such as "That art Thou", to realize the identity of Atman and Brahman.

Vedantasara (of Sadananda)

VedantasaraSadananda
While Shankara emphasized sravana ("hearing"), manana ("reflection") and nididhyasana ("repeated meditation"), later texts like the Dŗg-Dŗśya-Viveka (14th century) and Vedantasara (of Sadananda) (15th century) added samadhi as a means to liberation, a theme that was also emphasized by Swami Vivekananda.
Vedantasara, Essence of Vedanta, is a 15th-century Advaita vedanta text written by Sadananda Yogendra Saraswati.

Brahma Sutras

Brahma SutraBrahma SutrasVedanta-sutra
It gives "a unifying interpretation of the whole body of Upanishads", the Brahma Sutras, and the Bhagavad Gita.
It has been influential to various schools of Indian philosophies, but interpreted differently by the non-dualistic Advaita Vedanta sub-school, the theistic Vishishtadvaita and Dvaita Vedanta sub-schools, as well as others.

Ajativada

ajativadaajātano birth or death
Turiya is the state of liberation, where states Advaita school, one experiences the infinite (ananta) and non-different (advaita/abheda), that is free from the dualistic experience, the state in which ajativada, non-origination, is apprehended.
Ajātivāda is the fundamental philosophical doctrine of the Advaita Vedanta philosopher Gaudapada.

Vivartavada

vivarta
According to Andrew Nicholson, instead of parinama-vada, the competing causality theory is Vivartavada, which says "the world, is merely an unreal manifestation (vivarta) of Brahman. Vivartavada states that although Brahman appears to undergo a transformation, in fact no real change takes place. The myriad of beings are unreal manifestation, as the only real being is Brahman, that ultimate reality which is unborn, unchanging, and entirely without parts".
According to Advaita Vedanta, vivarta involves vikara or modification but only apparent modification (of the real which does not change).

Three Bodies Doctrine (Vedanta)

Three Bodies Doctrinethree bodiesSarira
Advaita posits three states of consciousness, namely waking (jagrat), dreaming (svapna), deep sleep (suṣupti), which are empirically experienced by human beings, and correspond to the Three Bodies Doctrine:
The Three Bodies Doctrine is an essential doctrine in Indian philosophy and religion, especially Yoga, Advaita Vedanta and Tantra.

Dṛg-Dṛśya-Viveka

Drk-Drsya-VivekaDrg-drshya-Viveka
While Shankara emphasized sravana ("hearing"), manana ("reflection") and nididhyasana ("repeated meditation"), later texts like the Dŗg-Dŗśya-Viveka (14th century) and Vedantasara (of Sadananda) (15th century) added samadhi as a means to liberation, a theme that was also emphasized by Swami Vivekananda.
The Dṛg-Dṛśya-Viveka is an Advaita Vedanta text attributed to Bĥaratī Tīrtha or Vidyaranya Swami(c.

Jainism

JainJainsJaina
Beyond Hinduism, Advaita Vedanta interacted and developed with the other traditions of India such as Jainism and Buddhism.
Jainism considers souls as pluralistic each in a karma-samsara cycle, and does not subscribe to Advaita-style ("not two") nondualism of Hinduism, or Advaya-style nondualism of Buddhism.

Matha

mathamuttMath
It is located in Kavale, Ponda, Goa, and is the oldest matha of the South Indian Saraswat Brahmins.
The earliest Hindu monasteries (mathas) are indirectly inferred to be from the centuries around the start of the common era, based on the existence of Sannyasa Upanishads with strongly Advaita Vedanta content.

Smarta tradition

SmartaSmartismSmartas
His teachings and tradition form the basis of Smartism and have influenced Sant Mat lineages.
It reflects a Hindu synthesis of four philosophical strands: Mimamsa, Advaita, Yoga and theism.

Yajnavalkya

YājñavalkyaYajñavalkyaYagyavalkya
In contrast, according to Frits Staal, a professor of Philosophy specializing in Sanskrit and Vedic studies, the word Advaita is from the Vedic era, and the Vedic sage Yajnavalkya (8th or 7th-century BCE ) is credited to be the one who coined it. Stephen Phillips, a professor of philosophy and Asian studies, translates the Advaita containing verse excerpt in Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, as follows:
Yajnavalkya is credited for coining Advaita (non-dual, monism), another important tradition within Hinduism.