Aeolic verse

Aeolic meterAeolic metresdactylic expansionAeolianAeolichipponacteanAeolic baseaeolic elementsAeolic metersAeolics
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.wikipedia
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Aeolic Greek

AeolicAeolic dialectThessalian
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.
Aeolic poetry, which is exemplified in the works of Sappho, mostly uses four classical meters known as the Aeolics: Glyconic (the most basic form of Aeolic line), hendecasyllabic verse, Sapphic stanza, and Alcaic stanza (the latter two are respectively named for Sappho and Alcaeus).

Cretic

amphimacerCreticus
In Sappho and Alcaeus, the three basic metrical groups – u u – u – (dodrans or choriambo-cretic), – u u – (choriamb) and – u – (cretic) figure importantly, and groups are sometimes joined (in what is probably a Greek innovation) by a link anceps.
In Greek poetry, the cretic was usually a form of paeonic or aeolic verse.

Anceps

ancipites
Anceps syllables in the middle or beginning of a line are characteristic of Aeolic meters, such as the Sapphic meter, of which the form of the first three lines is as follows ("–" = long, "u" = short, and "x" = anceps):

Metre (poetry)

metremeterprosody
In Aeolic verse, one important line was called the hendecasyllabic, a line of eleven syllables.

Asclepiad (poetry)

AsclepiadGreater AsclepiadAsclepiad metre
The form is attributed to Asclepiades of Samos and is one of the Aeolic metres.

Alcaic stanza

AlcaicAlcaics
(By also taking the cretic unit, mentioned above, into account, this analysis can also, for example, understand the third line of the Alcaic stanza—and other stanza lines as in Sappho frr.
The Alcaic stanza is a Greek lyrical meter, an Aeolic verse form traditionally believed to have been invented by Alcaeus, a lyric poet from Mytilene on the island of Lesbos, about 600 BC.

Latin poetry

LatinLatin versepoet
These verse forms were taken up and developed by later Greek and Roman poets and some modern European poets.
Catullus shared the Alexandrian's preference for short poems and wrote within a variety of meters borrowed from Greece, including Aeolian forms such as hendecasyllabic verse, the Sapphic stanza and Greater Asclepiad, as well as iambic verses such as the choliamb and the iambic tetrameter catalectic (a dialogue meter borrowed from Old Comedy).

Sapphic stanza

SapphicSapphicsSapphic meter
The Sapphic stanza, named after Sappho, is an Aeolic verse form spanning four lines (originally three: in the poetry of Sappho and Alcaeus, there is no line-end before the final Adonean).

Choriamb

choriambicchoriambuseupolidean tetrameter
In Sappho and Alcaeus, the three basic metrical groups – u u – u – (dodrans or choriambo-cretic), – u u – (choriamb) and – u – (cretic) figure importantly, and groups are sometimes joined (in what is probably a Greek innovation) by a link anceps.
The choriamb is sometimes regarded as the "nucleus" of Aeolic verse, because the pattern long-short-short-long pattern occurs, but to label this a "choriamb" is potentially misleading.

Greek lyric

Greek lyric poetlyric poetGreek lyric poetry
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.
The lyric meters' families are the Ionic, the Aeolic (based on the choriamb, which can generate varied kinds of verse, such as the glyconian or the Sapphic stanza), and the Dactylo-epitrite.

Adonic

adoneanAdonic or adonean lineadonics
An adonic (Latin: adoneus) is a unit of Aeolic verse, a five-syllable metrical foot consisting of a dactyl followed by a trochee.

Glyconic

glyconeusglyconic (3) / pherecratean (1)priapean
The glyconic line is the most basic form of Aeolic verse, and it is often combined with others.

Dodrans

Also called the choriambo-cretic, the pattern is common in Aeolic verse.

Sappho 94

fr. 94Fragment 94
130 – 131 (and the final lines of fr. 94's stanzas) are composed in a shortened version (gl d ) of the meter used in Book II of her poetry.
The poem is composed in stanzas of three lines, the first two glyconic and the third glyconic with dactylic expansion.

Hendecasyllable

hendecasyllabichendecasyllabic versealcaics
96, 98, 99—as Aeolic in nature, and appreciate how the initial three syllables of the Sapphic hendecasyllable were not variable in Sappho's practice.)
The classical hendecasyllable is a quantitative meter used in Ancient Greece in Aeolic verse and in scolia, and later by the Roman poets Catullus and Martial.

Pindar

PindaricPindarusancient Greek poet
In terms of meter, the odes fall roughly into two categories – about half are in dactylo-epitrites (a meter found for example in the works of Stesichorus, Simonides and Bacchylides) and the other half are in Aeolic metres based on iambs and choriambs.

Ionic meter

Ionicionic metre
Some fragments use meters from non-Aeolic traditions (e.g. dactylic hexameter, or the Ionic meter of Sappho fr.
The Ionic and Aeolic meters are closely related, as evidenced by the polyschematist unit x x — x — ‿ ‿ — (with x representing a syllable that may be heavy or light).

Theocritus

TheocriteanTheocritanTheocritos
Theocritus provides an example of the Hellenistic adaptation of Aeolic poetry in his Idylls 28 – 31, which also imitate the Archaic Aeolic dialect.
Two of these are certainly by Theocritus, 28 and 29, composed in Aeolic verse and in the Aeolic dialect.

Archaic Greece

ArchaicArchaic periodArchaic Greek
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.

Lesbos

Lesvosancient LesbosLesbos Island
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.

Sappho

Sappho of LesbosSapphicSapho
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.

Alcaeus of Mytilene

AlcaeusAlcaeus (Alkaios) of MytileneHorace's tribute
Aeolic verse is a classification of Ancient Greek lyric poetry referring to the distinct verse forms characteristic of the two great poets of Archaic Lesbos, Sappho and Alcaeus, who composed in their native Aeolic dialect.

Antoine Meillet

MeilletA. MeilletMeillet, Antoine
Antoine Meillet and later scholars, by comparison to Vedic meter, have seen in these principles and in other tendencies (the sequence ... – u u – u – ..., the alternation of blunt and pendant verses ) conserved traces of Proto-Indo-European poetic practices.

Vedic meter

poetic meterBrhatiVedic
Antoine Meillet and later scholars, by comparison to Vedic meter, have seen in these principles and in other tendencies (the sequence ... – u u – u – ..., the alternation of blunt and pendant verses ) conserved traces of Proto-Indo-European poetic practices.

Stichic

Aeolic poems may be stichic (with all lines having the same metrical form), or composed in more elaborate stanzas or strophes.