Aeolis

Greek settlements in western Asia Minor, Aeolian area in dark red.
Aeolis, Kyme; Tetradrachm; Silver; circa 165-140 BC; Obverse: Head of the Amazon Kyme right, wearing taenia; Reverse: Horse walking right, skyphos (one handled cup) below, ΚΥΜΑΙΩΝ left, ΣΕΥΘΗΣ (magistrate) in exergue, all within laurel-wreath; 34.2mm, 16.409g; Reference: SNG Von Aulock 1640; Oakley obv. die 59; Sg4183 var

Area that comprised the west and northwestern region of Asia Minor, mostly along the coast, and also several offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city-states were located.

- Aeolis
Greek settlements in western Asia Minor, Aeolian area in dark red.

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Greek settlements in western Asia Minor, Ionian area in green.

Ionia

Ancient region on the western coast of Anatolia, to the south of present-day Izmir.

Ancient region on the western coast of Anatolia, to the south of present-day Izmir.

Greek settlements in western Asia Minor, Ionian area in green.
The ruins of the ancient city of Pergamon
Art relics from the Ionian cities of Asia
One of the earliest electrum coins struck in Ephesus, 620–600 BC. Obverse: Forepart of stag. Reverse: Square incuse punch.
The site of Miletus, once coastal, now inland. The plain was a bay in Classical Greece.
Gorgone with serpent, Ionia, 575-550 BC.
The temple of Artemis in Sardis.
Possible coin of Ionia. Circa 600-550 BC
Ionia, Achaemenid Period. Uncertain satrap. Circa 350–333 BC
The Library of Celsus in Ephesus was built by the Romans in 114–117. The Temple of Artemis in Ephesus, built by king Croesus of Lydia in the 6th century BC, was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

It was bounded by Aeolia to the north, Lydia to the east and Caria to the south.

Gediz River

Second-longest river in Anatolia flowing into the Aegean Sea.

Second-longest river in Anatolia flowing into the Aegean Sea.

The Hermos separated Aeolia from Ionia, except for Ionic Phocaea, which was north of the Hermos.

The Agora of Smyrna (columns of the western stoa)

Smyrna

Greek city located at a strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia.

Greek city located at a strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia.

The Agora of Smyrna (columns of the western stoa)
Smyrna among the cities of Ionia and Lydia (ca. 50 AD)
The agora of ancient Smyrna
Arches of the ancient city of Smyrna
Agora of Smyrna, built during the Hellenistic era at the base of Pagos Hill and totally rebuilt under Marcus Aurelius after the destructive 178 AD earthquake
Head of the poetess Sappho, Smyrna, Marble copy of a prototype belonging to the Hellenistic Period, in Istanbul Archaeology Museums
Map of Smyrna and other cities within the Lydian Empire
The statue of the river god Kaystros with a cornucopia in Izmir Museum of History and Art at Kültürpark
Map of Western Anatolia showing the "Seven Churches of Asia" and the Greek island of Patmos
In the year 1403, Timur had decisively defeated the Knights Hospitaller at Smyrna, and therefore referred to himself as a Ghazi.
The Great Fire of Smyrna as seen from an Italian ship, 14 September 1922
Greek troops marching on İzmir's coastal street, May 1919
Engraving with a view of the site of Smyrna Agora a few years after the first explorations (1843)

This is the basis of Myrina, a city of Aeolis.

Map of Asia Minor showing the location of Kyme

Cyme (Aeolis)

Map of Asia Minor showing the location of Kyme
Aeolis, Kyme; Tetradrachm; Silver; circa 165-140 BC; Obverse: Head of the Amazon Kyme right, wearing taenia; Reverse: Horse walking right, skyphos (one handled cup) below, ΚΥΜΑΙΩΝ left, ΣΕΥΘΗΣ (magistrate) in exergue, all within laurel-wreath; 34.2mm, 16.409g; Reference: SNG Von Aulock 1640; Oakley obv. die 59; Sg4183 var
Aeolis, Larissa Phrikonis. ca 4th Century BC. Æ 11mm. Horned (?), three-quarter facing female head, turned slightly right, in necklace / LA, bull's head right.
Front: Cyme Ruins and Christian Cross, Back: Aliağa Port and Wind Mill
Nero & Diva Agrippina Jr Æ 15mm of Aeolis, Cyme. Circa 54-59 AD. QEON NERWNA KUMAIWN, young laureate head of Nero right / QEAN AGRIPPINAN, veiled head of Agrippina Jr right.
Statue of a young woman; late Hellenistic, 1st century BC, Cyme (Namurt).
Silver tetradrachm of Cyme, 165–140 BC
Mykonos vase 7th cent bce early depiction of Trojan Horse photographed by Travellingrunes Flickr 2949254926 4c9dc0882d o
Ionia, Uncertain city (possibly Kyme, Aeolis) 600-550 BC, Hemiobol. Horse head, rough incuse

Cyme (Κύμη or Κύμη Αιολίδας, Cyme of Aeolis) (modern Turkish Nemrut Limani) or Cumae was an Aeolian city in Aeolis (Asia Minor) close to the kingdom of Lydia.

Proto-Greek area of settlement (2200/2100-1900 B.C.) suggested by Katona (2000), Sakelariou (2016, 1980, 1975) and Phylaktopoulos (1975)

Aeolians

The Aeolians (Αἰολεῖς) were one of the four major tribes in which Greeks divided themselves in the ancient period (along with the Achaeans, Dorians and Ionians).

The Aeolians (Αἰολεῖς) were one of the four major tribes in which Greeks divided themselves in the ancient period (along with the Achaeans, Dorians and Ionians).

Proto-Greek area of settlement (2200/2100-1900 B.C.) suggested by Katona (2000), Sakelariou (2016, 1980, 1975) and Phylaktopoulos (1975)

During the Dorian invasion, Aeolians from Thessaly fled across the Aegean Sea to the island of Lesbos and the region of Aeolis, called as such after them, in Asia Minor.

The province of Asia highlighted within the Roman Empire.

Asia (Roman province)

Administrative unit added to the late Republic.

Administrative unit added to the late Republic.

The province of Asia highlighted within the Roman Empire.
The Roman provinces of Anatolia under Trajan, including Asia.
The Roman empire in the time of Hadrian (ruled 117-138 AD), showing, in western Anatolia, the senatorial province of Asia (southwestern Turkey).
The Roman conquest of Asia minor.

The province of Asia originally consisted of the territories of Mysia, the Troad, Aeolis, Lydia, Ionia, Caria, and the land corridor through Pisidia to Pamphylia.

Depiction of Croesus, Attic red-figure amphora, painted ca. 500–490 BC

Croesus

The king of Lydia, who reigned from 585 BC until his defeat by the Persian king Cyrus the Great in 547 or 546 BC.

The king of Lydia, who reigned from 585 BC until his defeat by the Persian king Cyrus the Great in 547 or 546 BC.

Depiction of Croesus, Attic red-figure amphora, painted ca. 500–490 BC
Lydia's borders under King Croesus
Gold coin of Croesus, Lydian, around 550 BC, found in what is now modern Turkey
Aesop in front of Croesus
Croesus showing his treasures to Solon. Frans Francken the Younger, 17th century
Silver croeseid issued by King Croesus of Lydia (561–545 BC), obverse: lion and bull protomes
Defeat of Croesus at the Battle of Thymbra, 546 BC.
Croesus vanquished, standing in front of Cyrus
Croesus on the pyre, Attic red-figure amphora, Louvre (G 197)

Croesus continued his attacks against the other Greek cities of the western coast of Asia Minor until he had subjugated all of mainland Ionia, Aeolis, and Doris, but he abandoned his plans of annexing the Greek city-states on the islands and he instead concluded treaties of friendship with them, which might have helped him participate in the lucrative trade the Aegean Greeks carried out with Egypt at Naucratis.

Coin of Kyzikos, Mysia. Circa 550–500 BC

Mysia

Region in the northwest of ancient Asia Minor (Anatolia, Asian part of modern Turkey).

Region in the northwest of ancient Asia Minor (Anatolia, Asian part of modern Turkey).

Coin of Kyzikos, Mysia. Circa 550–500 BC
Coin of Mysia, 4th century BC
Coin of Orontes as Satrap of Mysia, Adramyteion – c. undefined 357–352 BC
Coinage of Memnon of Rhodes, Mysia. Mid-4th century BC

It was bounded by Bithynia on the east, Phrygia on the southeast, Lydia on the south, Aeolis on the southwest, Troad on the west, and the Propontis on the north.

Ancient Myrina was located on the Beriki Tepe hill, on the left bank of the Pytikos River.

Myrina (Aeolis)

Ancient Myrina was located on the Beriki Tepe hill, on the left bank of the Pytikos River.
A terracotta figurine of a harpocratic Eros from Myrina, ca. 100–50 BC.
A terracotta figurine of a grotesque, 2nd-century BC. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.

Myrina was one of the Aeolian cities on the western coast of Mysia, about 40 stadia to the southwest of Gryneion.

Pitane (Aeolis)

Pitane, near Çandarlı, Turkey, was an ancient Greek town of the ancient region of Aeolis, in Asia Minor.