Aero Club of America

American Aero ClubAero ClubAero Club of Southern California
The Aero Club of America was a social club formed in 1905 by Charles Jasper Glidden and Augustus Post, among others, to promote aviation in America.wikipedia
139 Related Articles

Augustus Post

The Aero Club of America was a social club formed in 1905 by Charles Jasper Glidden and Augustus Post, among others, to promote aviation in America. In the summer of 1905 several members of the Automobile Club of America including Charles Glidden, Homer Hedge, Dave Morris, John F. O'Rourke, and Augustus Post founded the Aero Club of America.
Two years later he became the thirteenth man to fly solo in an airplane, and was an original founder of the Aero Club of America.

National Aeronautic Association

National Aeronautics AssociationNational Aeronautical AssociationNAA
It thrived until 1923, when it transformed into the National Aeronautic Association, which still exists today.
The NAA was founded in 1905 as the Aero Club of America (ACA), by members of the Automobile Club of America.

Robert J. Collier

Robert Joseph CollierRobert Collier
Starting in 1911, new president Robert J. Collier began presenting the Collier Trophy.
He was president of the Aero Club of America.

Collier Trophy

Robert J. Collier TrophyCollierAero Club of America Trophy
Starting in 1911, new president Robert J. Collier began presenting the Collier Trophy.
Robert J. Collier, publisher of Collier's Weekly magazine, was an air sports pioneer and president of the Aero Club of America.

Cortlandt F. Bishop

Cortlandt Field BishopAmy BendCortland Field Bishop
Cortlandt Field Bishop was president in 1910.
In 1909, as president of the Aero Club of America, Bishop offered a $250 prize to the first four persons who could fly one kilometer.

Pilot licensing and certification

pilot's licensepilot licensepilot's licence
It issued the first pilot's licenses in the United States, and successful completion of its licensing process was required by the United States Army for its pilots until 1914.
The Royal Aero Club followed in 1901 and the Aero Club of America was established in 1905.

Homer Hedge

In the summer of 1905 several members of the Automobile Club of America including Charles Glidden, Homer Hedge, Dave Morris, John F. O'Rourke, and Augustus Post founded the Aero Club of America.
He helped to found both the Automobile Club of America (currently known as the American Automobile Association) and the Aero Club of America.

Orteig Prize

flightprize of $25,000the first nonstop airplane flight from Paris and New York
He worked with wealthy hotel owner Raymond Orteig in securing the $25,000 for the Orteig Prize.
The offer was in the spirit of several similar aviation prize offers, and was made in a letter to Alan Ramsay Hawley, president of the Aero Club of America at the behest of Aero Club secretary Augustus Post.

Dave Hennen Morris

D. H. MorrisDave H. MorrisDave Morris
In the summer of 1905 several members of the Automobile Club of America including Charles Glidden, Homer Hedge, Dave Morris, John F. O'Rourke, and Augustus Post founded the Aero Club of America.
Morris was a founder of the Aero Club of America and of the Automobile Club of America.

Glenn Curtiss

Glenn H. CurtissCurtissGlenn Hammond Curtiss
On June 8, 1911 Curtiss received U.S. Pilot's License #1 from the Aero Club of America, because the first batch of licenses were issued in alphabetical order; Wilbur Wright received license #5.

John Moisant

John Bevins MoisantJohn B. MoisantMoisant International Aviators
At the Belmont Air Show in October 1910, a considerable controversy arose between the Englishman Claude Graham-White and the American J. B. Moisant.
Later, Moisant was granted a pilot's license from the Aéro-Club de France, which he transferred to the Aero Club of America to become the thirteenth registered pilot in the United States.

Harriet Quimby

In 1911, she was awarded a U.S. pilot's certificate by the Aero Club of America, becoming the first woman to gain a pilot's license in the United States.

Julia Clark

Julia Clark (December 21, 1880 – June 17, 1912) was the third woman to receive a pilot's license from the Aero Club of America, and the first American woman to die while piloting an airplane.

Frank P. Lahm

Frank Purdy LahmFrank LahmBrigadier General Frank Purdy Lahm
On July 19, 1913, he passed a Signal Corps-required flying test administered by the Aero Club of America (even though he had received an ACA aviator license in 1911) and received ACA ''Expert Aviator's Certificate No.

Louis Paulhan

The affair threatened the planned international aviation meet to be hosted by the Aero Club of America, at which the competition for the Gordon Bennett Trophy was to be held.

Thomas Scott Baldwin

Baldwin airshipBaldwin, Captain TomThomas Baldwin
He received the Aero Club of America's first balloon pilot certificate.

Norman Prince

Prince, under the alias 'George Manor' to conceal his flight training from his father, was the 55th American to be licensed to fly an airplane by the Aero Club of America.

Eugene Burton Ely

Eugene ElyEugene B. Elyfirst trials
Ely received the Aero Club of America pilot's license #17 on October 5, 1910.

Wright brothers

Orville WrightWilbur WrightOrville and Wilbur Wright
Some of the later licenses issued by the Aero Club of America bore the printed signature of Orville Wright.
In the U.S. the Wrights made an agreement with the Aero Club of America to license airshows which the Club approved, freeing participating pilots from a legal threat.

Matilde Moisant

Matilde E. MoisantMatilde
On 14 August 1911, a few weeks after her friend Harriet Quimby received her pilot's certificate, Matilde Moisant became the second woman pilot certified by the Aero Club of America.

Bernetta Adams Miller

Bernetta Miller
She received her license on September 16, 1912, becoming the fifth woman in the U.S. to hold a pilot's license (she held Aero Club of America license number 173).