A report on NigeriaWest Africa and Africa

Mansa Musa depicted holding a gold nugget from a 1395 map of Africa and Europe
The totality of Africa seen by the Apollo 17 crew
13th-century Africa – Map of the main trade routes and states, kingdoms and empires.
Lucy, an Australopithecus afarensis skeleton discovered 24 November 1974 in the Awash Valley of Ethiopia's Afar Depression
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West Africa circa 1875
Saharan rock art in the Fezzan
Ceremonial Igbo pot from 9th-century Igbo-Ukwu
French in West Africa circa 1913
Diachronic map showing African empires spanning roughly 500 BCE to 1500 CE
Yoruba copper mask of Obalufon from the city of Ife c. 1300
A rhinoceros in Bandia Nature Reserve, Senegal. Credit: Corine REZEL.
The Ezana Stone records King Ezana's conversion to Christianity and his subjugation of various neighboring peoples, including Meroë.
Royal Benin ivory mask, one of Nigeria's most recognized artifacts. Benin Empire, 16th century.
African bush elephants in Yankari National Park, Nigeria
The intricate 9th-century bronzes from Igbo-Ukwu, in Nigeria displayed a level of technical accomplishment that was notably more advanced than European bronze casting of the same period.
Frederick Lugard, 1st Baron Lugard who as Governor-General of Nigeria led the amalgamation of the Northern Nigeria Protectorate and Southern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914.
Deforestation in Nigeria.
Ruins of Great Zimbabwe (flourished eleventh to fifteenth centuries)
Emir of Kano with cavalry, 1911
Satellite imagery from outer space of West Africa
Major slave trading regions of Africa, 15th–19th centuries.
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Railway systems in West Africa, 2022
Comparison of Africa in the years 1880 and 1913
1953 postage stamp with portrait of Queen ElizabethII
Railway systems in West Africa 2030, projection
Topography of Africa
Nnamdi Azikiwe, first president of Nigeria from 1963 to 1966
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Today, the African Plate is moving over Earth's surface at a speed of 0.292° ± 0.007° per million years, relative to the "average" Earth (NNR-MORVEL56)
The Republic of Biafra in June 1967, when it declared its independence from the rest of Nigeria
A street and airport in the famous town of Timbuktu, Mali, showing the Sudano-Sahelian architectural style of the West African interior
The main biomes in Africa.
Shehu Shagari was the first democratically elected President of Nigeria from 1979 to 1983.
Philip Emeagwali wearing the Boubou (or Agbada), a traditional robe symbolic of West Africa
Africa Water Precipitation
Olusegun Obasanjo was civilian President of Nigeria from 1999 to 2007.
Jollof rice or Benachin, one of many Pan–West African dishes found only in West Africa
Savanna at Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania
Muhammadu Buhari is currently serving as President of Nigeria, since 2015.
Supporters of ASEC Mimosas
African countries by GDP (PPP) per capita in 2020
Nigerian National Assembly, Abuja
The talking drum is an instrument unique to West Africa.
A map showing religious distribution in Africa
Nigerian Army self-propelled anti-aircraft gun
Kora-playing griots in Senegal, 1900. Both the Kora, a 21-stringed harp-lute, and the griot musical-caste are unique to West Africa.
A simplistic view of language families spoken in Africa
Nigerian Air Force Mil Mi-35P
The 13th-century Great Mosque of Djenné is a superb example of the indigenous Sahelian architectural style prevalent in the Savannah and Sahelian interior of West Africa. It is listed an UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The rock-hewn Church of Saint George in Lalibela, Ethiopia is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Abuja
Voodoo altar with several fetishes in Abomey, Benin
Nok figure (5th century BC-5th century AD)
Former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan (centre) with United States President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama in August 2014
A musician from South Africa
Map of Nigeria with administrative divisions
Map of petroleum and natural gas within West Africa
Best results of African men's national football teams at the FIFA World Cup
Climate map of Nigeria
Praia, Cape Verde
An animated map shows the order of independence of African nations, 1950–2011
Palm plantation in Delta State
Dakar, Senegal
Africa's wars and conflicts, 1980–96 {{legend|#cc4c02|Major Wars/Conflict (100,000 + Casualties)}}{{legend|#fe9929|Minor Wars/Conflict}}{{legend|#fed98e|Other Conflicts}}
Rainforest range of Obudu Mountains
Lomé, Togo
Political map of Africa in 2021
Clouds kissing the mountains of Obudu
Porto-Novo, Benin
Map of the African Economic Community.
CEN-SAD
COMESA
EAC
ECCAS
ECOWAS
IGAD
SADC
UMA
A proportional representation of Nigeria exports, 2019
Niamey, Niger
Farm ploughing in Kwara State
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Oil facility at Bonny Island, Rivers State
Freetown, Sierra Leone
PTDF – Petroleum Technology Development Fund
Banjul, Gambia
Countries by natural gas proven reserves (2014). Nigeria has the largest reserves in Africa.
Conakry, Guinea
Innoson vehicles
Bissau, Guinea-Bissau
Steel factory in Ajaokuta
Monrovia, Liberia
Meridien Akwa Ibom golf course park
Bamako, Mali
Lekki Beach in Lagos
Georgetown, Ascension Island
Substation in Abuja
Tristan da Cunha, Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
Railway system in Nigeria, 2022
Second Niger bridge at Onitsha, artistic impression
SpaceX launch of CRS-11 with Nigeria EduSat-1 on board in 2017
Population density (persons per square kilometer) in Nigeria
Map of Nigeria's linguistic groups
The Abuja National Mosque
National Church of Nigeria, Abuja
Nigerian states that implement some form of sharia law (in green)
A hospital in Abuja
The University of Lagos
A Nigerian police officer at the Eyo festival in Lagos
End SARS is a decentralised social movement and series of mass protests against police brutality in Nigeria.
Nigerian women in tech
Lisa Folawiyo, Fashion Designer From Nigeria
An Eyo Iga Olowe Salaye masquerade jumping
Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Africa's most popular and best selling literary piece ever, has been translated into more than forty languages.
Wizkid is a popular musician in Nigeria, Africa and worldwide.
Nigeria at the 2018 FIFA World Cup
Nigerian football supporters at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia
Imota Rice Mill, close to Lagos
Oil and gas fields in the Niger delta
Oil and gas fields in the Niger delta
The world's biggest distilling column at the Dangote refinery in comparison
The world's biggest distilling column at the Dangote refinery in comparison
Pharmacy in Epe
Ituen Basi, Lagos based Nigerian fashion designer

Nigeria, officially the Federal Republic of Nigeria, is a country in West Africa.

- Nigeria

West Africa (or Western Africa) is the westernmost region of Africa.

- West Africa

The United Nations defines Western Africa as the 16 countries of Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo, as well as Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha (United Kingdom Overseas Territory).

- West Africa

It covers an area of 923769 km2, and with a population of over 218 million, it is the most populous country in Africa, and the world’s seventh-most populous country.

- Nigeria

Algeria is Africa's largest country by area, and Nigeria is its largest by population.

- Africa

During the 20th century, small but economically important communities of Lebanese and Chinese have also developed in the larger coastal cities of West and East Africa, respectively.

- Africa

6 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Mali

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The extent of the Mali Empire's peak
The pages above are from Timbuktu Manuscripts written in Sudani script (a form of Arabic) from the Mali Empire showing established knowledge of astronomy and mathematics. Today there are close to a million of these manuscripts found in Timbuktu alone.
Griots of Sambala, king of Médina (Fula people, Mali), 1890
Cotton being processed in Niono into 400 lb bales for export to other parts of Africa and to France, c. 1950
WWI Commemorative Monument to the "Armée Noire"
Tuareg separatist rebels in Mali, January 2012
Members of the National Committee for the Salvation of the People, directory of the ruling junta in Mali
Satellite image of Mali
Mali map of Köppen climate classification
Landscape in Hombori
Ex-Malian Transition President Dioncounda Traoré
Former President of Mali Amadou Toumani Touré and Minister-president of the Netherlands Mark Rutte
A market scene in Djenné
A proportional representation of Mali exports, 2019
Kalabougou potters
Cotton processing at CMDT
GDP per capita development of Mali
A Bozo girl in Bamako
The Tuareg are historic, nomadic inhabitants of northern Mali.
An entrance to the Djinguereber mosque
High school students in Kati
Village in the Sahel region
Konoguel Mosque tower
Mali Dogon Dance
Malian children playing football in a Dogon village
Malian tea

Mali, officially the Republic of Mali, is a landlocked country in West Africa.

Mali is the eighth-largest country in Africa, with an area of over 1240000 sqkm.

The Songhai people originated in current northwestern Nigeria.

A group of Yoruba people at a public event

Yoruba people

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A group of Yoruba people at a public event
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Degree of Presence of The Yoruba and derived' Ede 
groups in Nigeria, Benin & Togo at Subnational levels
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Palace of the King of Oyo circa 1900s - Colorized
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Anna Hinderer church and mission house at Ibadan, 1850s
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Yoruba door, wood carvings; used to record events c. 1910
Early 19th century Yoruba architecture showing their unique inner courtyard layout used as a safe space for storing livestock and a space where children could play
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Gbedu drummers
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Wooden Ere Ibeji figures representing twins. Yorubas have the highest twinning rate in the world.
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An older traditional Agbada clothing historically worn by Yoruba men. This exhibit was obtained in the town of Òkukù.
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African Languages Spoken in American Households
Commemoration of Black consciousness, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Amala is a Yoruba food.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/A_Vocabulary_of_the_Yoruba_Language/oXxBAAAAYAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=amala|title=A Vocabulary of the Yoruba Language|author=Owen Emeric Vidal|publisher=Seeleys|date=1852|isbn=9781976589218}}</ref>
Akara is a Yoruba bean fritter.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/A_Vocabulary_of_the_Yoruba_Language/oXxBAAAAYAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=akara|title=A Vocabulary of the Yoruba Language|author=Owen Emeric Vidal|publisher=Seeleys|date=1852|isbn=9781976589218}}</ref>
Ofada rice is a Yoruba dish.<ref name="Olusegun Obasanjo 1983">{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Management_in_Agriculture_Rural_Developm/JdrSAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%22ofada%20rice%22|title=Management in Agriculture & Rural Development: A Practicioner's View|author=Olusegun Obasanjo|date=1983|isbn=9789782399243}}</ref>
Ofada rice is traditionally in a leaf.
Moin Moin is a Yoruba steamed bean pudding.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Adim%C3%BA/w3r4Xx2059AC?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%22moin+moin%22|title=Adimú: Gbogbó Tén'unjé Lukumí|author=Miguel Willie Ramos|publisher=Eleda.Org Publications|date=July 2012|isbn=9781877845109}}</ref>
A collection of foods eaten by Yorubas in general
Simple Iro and Buba with Gele<ref name="Esogwa C. Osuala 1988">{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Fundamentals_of_Nigerian_Marketing/JfbTAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%22iro+and+buba%22&dq=%22iro+and+buba%22&printsec=frontcover|title=Fundamentals of Nigerian Marketing|author=Esogwa C. Osuala|date=1988|publisher=Pacific Publishers|isbn=9789782347299}}</ref>
Agbádá àti Fìlà<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Yoruba_Dress/CzAqd4vGphoC?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=agbada+and+fila&dq=agbada+and+fila&printsec=frontcover|title=Yoruba Dress: A Systematic Case Study of Five Generations of a Lagos Family|author=Betty Marguerite Wass|date=1975|publisher=Michigan State University. Department of Family Ecology|isbn=9789782347299|pages=143–183}}</ref>
Iro and Bùbá, with Gele and Ipele. Blouse, wrapper and headgear<ref name="Esogwa C. Osuala 1988"/>
Bùbá àti Kèmbè. Agbada top with short baggy pants<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/A_Handbook_of_Nigerian_Culture/n1AuAQAAIAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=kembe|title=A Handbook of Nigerian Culture|author1=Frank Aig-Imoukhuede|author2=Nigeria. Federal Ministry of Information and Culture|date=1992|publisher=Department of Culture, Federal Ministry of Information and Culture|isbn=9789783131613|page=134}}</ref>
Iro and Bùbá, with Gele and Ipele made from Òfì<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Aso_Oke_Yoruba/bH5djwEACAAJ?hl=en|title=Aso Oke Yoruba: A Tapestry of Love & Color, a Journey of Personal Discovery|author=Tola Adenle|date=February 2, 2016|publisher=CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform|isbn=9781523495221}}</ref>
Agbádá àti Sóró, Agbada and long slim pants<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Lekki/o9EuAQAAIAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=They%20wear%20dresses%20like|title=Lekki|author=Bola researcher/writer Sebastian|date=1992|publisher=Public Information Department, Lagos State Ministry of Information, Culture, Youth & Sports|page=3}}</ref>
Ìró and Bùbá with gele<ref name="Esogwa C. Osuala 1988"/>

The Yoruba people (Ìran Yorùbá, Ọmọ Odùduwà, Ọmọ Káàárọ̀-oòjíire ) are a West African ethnic group that mainly inhabits parts of Nigeria, Benin and Togo.

The Yorubas constitute more than 47 million people in Africa, are a few hundred thousand outside the continent, and bear further representation among members of the African diaspora.

The main slave routes in medieval Africa

Slavery in Africa

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The main slave routes in medieval Africa
A Zanj slave gang in Zanzibar (1889)
Slaves for sacrifice at the Annual Customs of Dahomey – from The history of Dahomy, an inland Kingdom of Africa, 1793
Malagasy slaves (Andevo) carrying Queen Ranavalona I of Madagascar
Nubians waiting to be sold at a slave market in ancient Egypt.
Release of Christian slaves by payment of ransom by Catholic monks in Algiers in 1661.
Burning of a Village in Africa, and Capture of its Inhabitants (p.12, February 1859, XVI)
Christian slavery in Barbary.
Black Zanjs captured in a slave raid being marched to a slave market in the Arab world.
A 'servant-slave' woman in Mogadishu (1882–1883)
Slaves in Ethiopia, 19th century.
A slave market in Khartoum, c. 1876
Elderly female slave, c. 1911/15, owned by Njapundunke, mother of the Bamum king Ibrahim Njoya
Homann Heirs map of the slave trade in West Africa, from Senegal and Cape Blanc to Guinea, the Cacongo and Barbela rivers, and Ghana Lake on the Niger River as far as Regio Auri (1743)
A slave trader of Gorée, c. 1797
Zanzibari slave trader Tippu Tip owned 10,000 slaves.
The Door of No Return in Ouidah. Memorial to the slave trade through the port of Ouidah.
Swahili-Arab slave traders and their captives along the Ruvuma River in Mozambique, 19th century
African slaves working in 17th-century Virginia, by an unknown artist, 1670
Jean-Baptiste Debret's conception of enslaved persons in Brazil (1839)
Slave trade along the Senegal River, kingdom of Cayor
Capture of slave ship Emanuela by.
Slave trade out of Africa, 1500–1900
Photograph of a slave boy in Zanzibar. 'An Arab master's punishment for a slight offence.' c. 1890.
Cowrie shells were used as money in the slave trade
Two slightly differing Okpoho Manillas as used to purchase slaves

Slavery has historically been widespread in Africa.

Pawnship was a common form of collateral in West Africa.

Sacrifices were common in the Benin Empire, in what is now Ghana, and in the small independent states in what is now southern Nigeria.

Camels trample the soil in the semiarid Sahel as they move to water holes, such as this one in Chad

Sahel

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Camels trample the soil in the semiarid Sahel as they move to water holes, such as this one in Chad
The lush green of the rainy season Sahelian forest, along the Bamako-Kayes Road in Mali. The trees in the foreground are acacia. Note the large baobab tree.
Herders with livestock and azawakh dogs in the Sahel
Ennedi Plateau is located at the border of the Sahara and the Sahel
Fulani herders in Mali
1905 depiction of ethnic groups in the Sahel

The Sahel (ساحل sāḥil, "coast, shore") is the ecoclimatic and biogeographic realm of transition in Africa between the Sahara to the north and the Sudanian savanna to the south.

The Sahel part of Africa includes from west to east parts of northern Senegal, southern Mauritania, central Mali, northern Burkina Faso, the extreme south of Algeria, Niger and Egypt, the extreme north of Nigeria, Cameroon and Central African Republic, central Chad, central and southern Sudan, the extreme north of South Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia.

This, in turn, decreased the amount of land conducive to settlements and caused migrations of farming communities to the more humid climate of West Africa.

Ghana

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16th-century Akan Terracotta, Metropolitan Museum of Art
An 1850 map showing the Akan Kingdom of Ashanti within the Guinea region and surrounding regions in West Africa
18th-century Ashanti brass kuduo. Gold dust and nuggets were kept in kuduo, as were other items of personal value and significance. As receptacles for their owners' kra, or life force, kuduo were prominent features of ceremonies designed to honour and protect that individual.
The Portuguese established the Portuguese Gold Coast with the construction of Elmina Castle (Castelo da Mina) by Diogo de Azambuja in 1482, making it the oldest European building in Sub-Saharan Africa.
During Anglo-Ashanti Wars British troops ransacking a Fomena chief's palace en route to Kumasi in 1874
Kwame Nkrumah, first President of Ghana
Traditional chiefs in Ghana in 2015
Fiho kopé - south Ghana
Parliament House of Ghana, the Supreme Court of Ghana and Judiciary of Ghana buildings and Jubilee House is the presidential palace.
First President of the Republic of Ghana Nkrumah and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th presidents of the 4th Republic of Ghana Rawlings; Kufuor; Mills and Mahama.
Kofi Annan, Ghanaian diplomat and United Nations Secretary-General 1997–2006
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan inspects Honour Guards mounted by the Ghana Air Force at the Jubilee House the Presidential Palace of Ghana in Greater Accra on 1 March 2016.
Militarized police Unit of the Ghana Police Service
Ghana is among the sovereign states of West Africa used by drug cartels and drug traffickers (shown in orange).
Change in per capita GDP of Ghana, 1870–2018. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars
A proportional representation of Ghana exports, 2019
Ghana petroleum and commodities; exports in percentage.
Jubilee oil field of the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) and National Petroleum Authority located off the coast of the Western Region in Ghana in the South Atlantic Ocean.
Surfers surfing and big wave surfing at Busua Beach in Western region
A villa in East Ridge
Ghana Export Treemap by Product (2017) from Harvard Atlas of Economic Complexity
Ghana education system's implementation of information and communications technology at the University of Ghana
Population pyramid 2016
Ghana Card (Ghanaian electronic ID Card) – obverse with chip
Development of life expectancy, 1921 to 2019
Hogbetsotso festival in the Volta region
Adinkra symbols by Robert Sutherland Rattray
Kente cloth, the traditional or national cloth of Ghana, is worn by most southern Ghanaian ethnic groups including the Akan, the Ga, and the Ewe.
Ghana mass media, news and information provided by television.
Black Stars, the Ghana national football team.
Black Stars goal celebration.
Ghanaian winter sports Olympic team at the opening ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympics
Modern high-rise buildings in Accra, the capital.
Administration block of Achimota School

Ghana, officially the Republic of Ghana, is a country in West Africa.

With over 31 million people, Ghana is the second-most populous country in West Africa, after Nigeria.

Ghana is the leader in the adoption of digital financial services in Africa and set to increase financial inclusion to more than 85% until 2024.

Igbo people

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The Igbo people (, also ; also spelled Ibo and formerly also Iboe, Ebo, Eboe, Eboans, Heebo;

The Igbo people (, also ; also spelled Ibo and formerly also Iboe, Ebo, Eboe, Eboans, Heebo;

Bronze from the ninth century town of Igbo Ukwu, now at the British Museum
An Igbo man with facial scarifications, known as ichi, early 20th century
Three Igbo women in the early 20th century
Flag of the Republic of Biafra (1967–1970), sometimes regarded as the ethnic flag of the Igbo
Anklet beaten from a solid brass bar of the type once fashionable among Igbo women. Now in the collection of Wolverhampton Art Gallery. The leg-tube extends approx 7 cm each side of the 35 cm disc.
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is the most popular and renowned novel that deals with the Igbo and their traditional life.
Thatching with palm leaf mats, early 20th century
Traditional Igbo house/room from the Anambra area, 1967
Wooden sculpture of Ikenga, an Alusi, in the Musée du Quai Branly.
The Holy Ghost depicted as a dove on a relief in Onitsha
A modern Igbo wedding, Nnewi, Nigeria
Men wearing contemporary Isiagu with the ceremonial Igbo men's hat okpu agu
striped men's hat
Yam porridge (or yam pottage) is an Igbo dish known as awaị.
Igbo people celebrating the New Yam festival in Dublin, Ireland

natively Ṇ́dị́ Ìgbò) are an ethnic group in Nigeria.

This way of governing was different from most other communities of Western Africa and only shared by the Ewe of Ghana.

Prominent Igbo communities outside Africa include those of London in the United Kingdom and Houston, Baltimore, Chicago, Detroit, Seattle, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. in the United States.