A report on African immigration to the United States

African immigration to the U.S. by broad class of admission

African immigration to the United States refers to immigrants to the United States who are or were nationals of modern African countries.

- African immigration to the United States
African immigration to the U.S. by broad class of admission

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African Americans

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Ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa.

Ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa.

Slaves processing tobacco in 17th-century Virginia, illustration from 1670
The first slave auction at New Amsterdam in 1655, illustration from 1895 by Howard Pyle
Reproduction of a handbill advertising a slave auction in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1769
Crispus Attucks, the first "martyr" of the American Revolution. He was of Native American and African-American descent.
Frederick Douglass, ca 1850
Slaves Waiting for Sale: Richmond, Virginia, 1853. Note the new clothes. The domestic slave trade broke up many families, and individuals lost their connection to families and clans.
Harriet Tubman, around 1869
A group of White men pose for a 1919 photograph as they stand over the Black victim Will Brown who had been lynched and had his body mutilated and burned during the Omaha race riot of 1919 in Omaha, Nebraska. Postcards and photographs of lynchings were popular souvenirs in the U.S.
Rosa Parks being fingerprinted after being arrested for not giving up her seat on a bus to a White person
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963, shows civil rights leaders and union leaders
Black Lives Matter protest in response to the fatal shooting of Philando Castile in July 2016
Proportion of African Americans in each U.S. state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico as of the 2020 United States Census
U.S. Census map indicating U.S. counties with fewer than 25 Black or African-American inhabitants
Graph showing the percentage of the African-American population living in the American South, 1790–2010. Note the major declines between 1910 and 1940 and 1940–1970, and the reverse trend post-1970. Nonetheless, the absolute majority of the African-American population has always lived in the American South.
Former slave reading, 1870
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is director of New York City's Hayden Planetarium
The US homeownership rate according to race
This graph shows the real median US household income by race: 1967 to 2011, in 2011 dollars.
"Lift Every Voice and Sing" being sung by the family of Barack Obama, Smokey Robinson and others in the White House in 2014
Genetic clustering of 128 African Americans, by Zakharaia et al. (2009). Each vertical bar represents an individual. The color scheme of the bar plot matches that in the PCA plot.
Al Sharpton led the Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks protest on August 28, 2020.
Although the ban on interracial marriage ended in California in 1948, entertainer Sammy Davis Jr. faced a backlash for his involvement with a White woman in 1957
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. remains the most prominent political leader in the American civil rights movement and perhaps the most influential African-American political figure in general.
BET founder Robert L. Johnson with former U.S. President George W. Bush
A traditional soul food dinner consisting of fried chicken with macaroni and cheese, collard greens, breaded fried okra and cornbread
Mount Zion United Methodist Church is the oldest African-American congregation in Washington, D.C.
Masjid Malcolm Shabazz in Harlem, New York City
This parade float displayed the word "Afro-Americans" in 1911.
Michelle Obama was the First Lady of the United States; she and her husband, President Barack Obama, are the first African Americans to hold these positions.
Racially segregated Negro section of keypunch operators at the US Census Bureau

According to U.S. Census Bureau data, African immigrants generally do not self-identify as African American.

Philadelphia

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Largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the sixth most populous city in the U.S., and the second most populous city in the Northeast megalopolis, behind New York City.

Largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the sixth most populous city in the U.S., and the second most populous city in the Northeast megalopolis, behind New York City.

Benjamin Franklin, 1777
Independence Hall on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets in Philadelphia, where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were ratified on July 4, 1776 and June 21, 1788, respectively
An 18th-century map of Philadelphia, circa 1752
Sentinel-2 true-color image of Philadelphia and the Delaware River, September 2020
This 1683 portrait of Philadelphia, created by Thomas Holme, is believed to be the first map ever developed of the city of Philadelphia
Center City Philadelphia's contrasting architectural styles can be seen in One Liberty Place, built between 1985 and 1987 (in the background), and Philadelphia City Hall, built between 1871 and 1901 (in the foreground), July 2009
Philadelphia's Fairmount Park along the Schuylkill River, circa 1900
Map of racial distribution in Philadelphia, 2010 Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Philadelphia's famed Italian Market, part of South Philadelphia's Italian heritage, June 2006
"Leacht Cuimhneacháin na Gael", an Irish famine memorial at Penn's Landing honors the large Irish community (14.2% of the city's population), April 2015
Gayborhood street sign, near Washington Square, April 2007
Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania, April 2010
Interior of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, built in the 1860s
The Philadelphia Stock Exchange, the oldest stock exchange in the United States, October 2009
FMC Tower at Cira Centre South, July 2018
William Penn Charter School, established in 1689, is the oldest Quaker school in the nation
The campus of the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League university in Philadelphia and one of the highest ranked universities in the world, November 2005
Medical Hall housing at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, the oldest medical school in the United States
Philadelphia Museum of Art, April 2010
Keys To Community, a bust of Ben Franklin by James Peniston, 2007
Kimmel Center, home of the Philadelphia Orchestra
Curtis Institute of Music, one of the world's premier conservatories
Pat's Steaks and Geno's Steaks in Philadelphia, August 2010
The Flyers play at the Wells Fargo Center, March 2014
Historic Boathouse Row at night on the Schuylkill, a symbol of the city's rich rowing history
Old City Hall served as Philadelphia's town hall from 1800 to 1854.
James A. Byrne United States Courthouse houses the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
Jim Kenney, the current and 99th Mayor of Philadelphia
Police Administration Building (the Roundhouse) in Center City, east of Chinatown
Mounted police officer in Center City, 1973
A Philadelphia police cruiser on Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Inquirer Building at 400 North Broad Street was home of The Philadelphia Inquirer, the third longest continuously published newspaper in the United States, until 2012. It is currently undergoing renovations to become the new headquarters of the Philadelphia Police Department.
Original studio for WCAU, Philadelphia's NBC affiliate, 1622 Chestnut Street
2016 photo of 30th Street Station, which accommodates both SEPTA regional and Amtrak national trains. 30th Street Station is Amtrak's third busiest train station in the nation.
Market–Frankford Line train departing 52nd Street station
Philadelphia International Airport, the busiest airport in Pennsylvania and 21st busiest in the nation
Traffic heading into Philadelphia on Interstate 95 during the morning rush hour, July 2008
The Ben Franklin Bridge, which connects Philadelphia and Camden, New Jersey
Suburban Station with art deco architecture at 16th Street and JFK Boulevard
Fairmount Water Works, Philadelphia's second municipal waterworks
Chinatown paifang at 10th and Arch (2013), a symbol of Philadelphia's friendship with Tianjin. Philadelphia is experiencing significant Chinese immigration from New York City, 95 miles to the north, and from China.
The Birth of Pennsylvania, 1680, by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris – William Penn, holding paper, and King Charles II
Penn's Treaty with the Indians by Benjamin West
John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence – the Committee of Five presents their draft in Independence Hall, June 28, 1776.<ref>John Hazelton, The Historical Value of Trumbull's: Declaration of Independence, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, volume 31 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1907), 38.</ref>
President's House – the presidential mansion of George Washington and John Adams, 1790–1800
Opening day ceremonies at the Centennial Exposition at Memorial Hall, 1876 – first official World's fair in the United States
Elfreth's Alley, "Our nation's oldest residential street", 1702–1836<ref name="marker">Historical marker on Elfreth's Alley</ref>
Carpenters' Hall exhibiting Georgian architecture, 1770–1774
Second Bank of the United States exhibiting Greek Revival architecture, 1818–1824
Second Empire-style Philadelphia City Hall, 1871–1901, from South Broad Street
The grand concourse of the 30th Street Station, in Art Deco style, 1927–1933
The University of Pennsylvania Medical School, the oldest medical school in the United States
The paifang “Friendship Arch” at Chinatown, one of America’s largest, attracting Chinese immigrants from both New York City and China.
The annual Naked Bike Ride attracts participants domestically and worldwide to Philadelphia.
The Wharton School of Business is one of the world’s most prestigious business schools.
Jim Kenney, the 99th Mayor of Philadelphia

West Philadelphia and Southwest Philadelphia are also home to various significant Afro-Caribbean and African immigrant communities.