A report on Afrikaners and Comodoro Rivadavia

Afrikaner children in Namibia playing tug of war
Painting of the arrival of Jan van Riebeeck
Trekboers making camp, an 1804 painting by Samuel Daniell.
Commodore Martín Rivadavia
Weenen massacre: Zulus killed hundreds of Boer colonists (1838)
The Huergo Chalet, built in 1919, hosted numerous official gatherings
Boer guerrillas during the Second Boer War
San Juan Bosco Cathedral
Lizzie van Zyl, visited by Emily Hobhouse in a British concentration camp
Campus of the National University of Patagonia San Juan Bosco
Boer women and children in British concentration camps
Panoramic view of the city.
Boer children, c. 1901
The Casino Club Comodoro, part of a growing tourism sector
Admixture analysis of 77 Afrikaners.
The PCR petrochemical company, a leading local employer
de Klerk and Mandela shake hands in January 1992
Viteaux and Chenque Hills, the city's most distinctive geographic features
Afrikaner farmer in Georgia, Caucasus region, 2011
The Port Zone from Chenque Hill
Distribution of Afrikaans versus English as home language of white South Africans.
87.5–100% Afrikaans
75–87.5% Afrikaans
62.5–75% Afrikaans
50–62.5% Afrikaans
50–62.5% English
62.5–75% English
75–87.5% English
87.5–100% English
The Comodoro Rivadavia wind farm
Map of a nearby track, Autódromo General San Martín

In 1903 six hundred Afrikaner families arrived in Argentina following the loss of the Second Boer War.

- Comodoro Rivadavia

Starting in 1902 to 1908 a large group of around 650 Afrikaners emigrated to the Patagonia region of Argentina, under the leadership Louis Baumann and the Italian Camillo Ricchiardi (most notably to the towns of Comodoro Rivadavia and Sarmiento), choosing to settle there due to its similarity to the Karoo region of South Africa.

- Afrikaners
Afrikaner children in Namibia playing tug of war

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Sarmiento, Chubut

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Town in the province of Chubut, Argentina.

Town in the province of Chubut, Argentina.

It is located on the so-called Central Corridor of Patagonia, in a fertile valley amidst an otherwise arid region, 140 km west from Comodoro Rivadavia, in the south of Chubut.

In 1903, 600 Afrikaner families arrived in Argentina following the loss of the Second Boer War.