After Dark, My Sweet

film of the same name
After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.wikipedia
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Jason Patric

Jason Patrik
After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.
Within a couple years, Patric would reunite with Gertz in The Lost Boys and After Dark, My Sweet with Dern.

Bruce Dern

BruceBruce MacLeish Dern
After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.

James Foley (director)

James Foley
After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.

Rachel Ward

After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.

After Dark, My Sweet (novel)

After Dark, My Sweetnovel of the same name
It is based on the 1955 Jim Thompson novel of the same name.
The novel was adapted into a film of the same name in 1990.

Mecca, California

MeccaMecca.Travertine Point
Filming took place in Mecca, California, part of the Coachella Valley.
Mecca was also the setting for the 1990 neo-noir film After Dark, My Sweet, directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.

George Dickerson

He had major roles in films like Psycho II (1983), Space Raiders (1983), The Star Chamber (1983), No Mercy (1986), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987), After Dark, My Sweet (1990), and Death Warrant (1990).

Film noir

noirfilm-noirnoir film
Film critic Roger Ebert put this on his "Great Movies" list and wrote in his Chicago Sun-Times review: "After Dark, My Sweet is the movie that eluded audiences; it grossed less than $3 million, has been almost forgotten, and remains one of the purest and most uncompromising of modern film noir. It captures above all the lonely, exhausted lives of its characters."
Other films from the era readily identifiable as neo-noir (some retro, some more au courant) include director John Dahl's Kill Me Again (1989), Red Rock West (1992), and The Last Seduction (1993); four adaptations of novels by Jim Thompson—The Kill-Off (1989), After Dark, My Sweet (1990), The Grifters (1990), and the remake of The Getaway (1994); and many more, including adaptations of the work of other major noir fiction writers: The Hot Spot (1990), from Hell Hath No Fury, by Charles Williams; Miami Blues (1990), from the novel by Charles Willeford; and Out of Sight (1998), from the novel by Elmore Leonard.

Maurice Jarre

JarreJarre, Maurice
Also to his credit is the passionate love theme from Fatal Attraction (1987), and the moody electronic soundscapes of After Dark, My Sweet (1990).

Cinema of the United States

HollywoodAmericanHollywood films
After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.

Neo-noir

neo noirneo-noir filmnoir
After Dark, My Sweet is a 1990 American neo-noir film directed by James Foley and starring Jason Patric, Bruce Dern, and Rachel Ward.

Jim Thompson (writer)

Jim ThompsonJames M. Thompson
It is based on the 1955 Jim Thompson novel of the same name. Peter Travers of The Rolling Stone wrote: "Patric is sensational as Collie; the pretty-boy actor ... is unrecognizable behind Collie's coarse stubble, slack jaw and haunted stare. Patric occupies a complex character with mesmerizing conviction. Like Thompson's prose, his performance is both repellent and fascinating."

Palm Springs, California

Palm SpringsPalm Springs, CAAgua Caliente
In a desert town near Palm Springs he meets widow Fay Anderson who convinces him to help fix up the neglected estate her husband left and lets him sleep in a trailer out back, near her dying date palms.

Coachella Valley

CoachellaCoachella Valley Weekly Coachella Valley, CA
Filming took place in Mecca, California, part of the Coachella Valley.

Roger Ebert

RogerEbert.comEbertEbert, Roger
Film critic Roger Ebert put this on his "Great Movies" list and wrote in his Chicago Sun-Times review: "After Dark, My Sweet is the movie that eluded audiences; it grossed less than $3 million, has been almost forgotten, and remains one of the purest and most uncompromising of modern film noir. It captures above all the lonely, exhausted lives of its characters."

Chicago Sun-Times

Chicago Sun TimesThe Chicago Sun-TimesChicago Sun
Film critic Roger Ebert put this on his "Great Movies" list and wrote in his Chicago Sun-Times review: "After Dark, My Sweet is the movie that eluded audiences; it grossed less than $3 million, has been almost forgotten, and remains one of the purest and most uncompromising of modern film noir. It captures above all the lonely, exhausted lives of its characters."

Variety (magazine)

VarietyDaily VarietyVariety magazine
Variety also received the film favorably: "Director-cowriter James Foley has given this near-perfect adaptation of a Jim Thompson novel a contempo setting and emotional realism that make it as potent as a snakebite...Lensed in the arid and existential sun-blasted landscape of Indio, Calif, the pungently seedy film creates a kind of genre unto itself, a film soleil, perhaps."

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone MagazineRolling Stone IndonesiaRolling Stone'' magazine
Peter Travers of The Rolling Stone wrote: "Patric is sensational as Collie; the pretty-boy actor ... is unrecognizable behind Collie's coarse stubble, slack jaw and haunted stare. Patric occupies a complex character with mesmerizing conviction. Like Thompson's prose, his performance is both repellent and fascinating."

Entertainment Weekly

EWEWwy AwardEW.com
When the video was released in 1991, Entertainment Weekly film critic Melissa Pierson wrote: "Fittingly, director James Foley (At Close Range) puts style over story, capturing the gritty, long-shadowed tone of his source material. After Dark, My Sweet looks simultaneously crisp and drenched in the yellow light of a strange dream, an effect that becomes especially haunting on video. In this alluring tour through unsettled emotional territory, Jason Patric (The Lost Boys) gives an exceptionally sharp performance as an ex-boxer with one screw loose and another turned down tight. He's drawn into a kidnapping scheme concocted by a former cop (Bruce Dern) and a sultry widow (Rachel Ward, for whom acting apparently means gesticulating). Together, they visit a place where desire and pain are indistinguishable, and everything goes twistingly awry."

At Close Range

When the video was released in 1991, Entertainment Weekly film critic Melissa Pierson wrote: "Fittingly, director James Foley (At Close Range) puts style over story, capturing the gritty, long-shadowed tone of his source material. After Dark, My Sweet looks simultaneously crisp and drenched in the yellow light of a strange dream, an effect that becomes especially haunting on video. In this alluring tour through unsettled emotional territory, Jason Patric (The Lost Boys) gives an exceptionally sharp performance as an ex-boxer with one screw loose and another turned down tight. He's drawn into a kidnapping scheme concocted by a former cop (Bruce Dern) and a sultry widow (Rachel Ward, for whom acting apparently means gesticulating). Together, they visit a place where desire and pain are indistinguishable, and everything goes twistingly awry."

The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys'' soundtrackLost in the Shadowssoundtrack
When the video was released in 1991, Entertainment Weekly film critic Melissa Pierson wrote: "Fittingly, director James Foley (At Close Range) puts style over story, capturing the gritty, long-shadowed tone of his source material. After Dark, My Sweet looks simultaneously crisp and drenched in the yellow light of a strange dream, an effect that becomes especially haunting on video. In this alluring tour through unsettled emotional territory, Jason Patric (The Lost Boys) gives an exceptionally sharp performance as an ex-boxer with one screw loose and another turned down tight. He's drawn into a kidnapping scheme concocted by a former cop (Bruce Dern) and a sultry widow (Rachel Ward, for whom acting apparently means gesticulating). Together, they visit a place where desire and pain are indistinguishable, and everything goes twistingly awry."

Robert K. Elder

In an interview with Robert K. Elder for his book The Best Film You've Never Seen, director Austin Chick praises the movie for its cinematography, stating: "It's beautifully shot ... every frame and every camera move is clearly thought out and brilliantly, beautifully executed."

Best Film You've Never Seen

The Best Film You've Never Seen
In an interview with Robert K. Elder for his book The Best Film You've Never Seen, director Austin Chick praises the movie for its cinematography, stating: "It's beautifully shot ... every frame and every camera move is clearly thought out and brilliantly, beautifully executed."