After Hegemony

After Hegemony

Book by Robert Keohane first published in 1984.

- After Hegemony

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Liberal institutionalism

Theory of international relations that holds that international cooperation between states is feasible and sustainable, and that such cooperation can reduce conflict and competition.

Thucydides author of History of the Peloponnesian War is considered one of the earliest "realist" thinkers.

Robert Keohane's 1984 book After Hegemony used insights from the new institutional economics to argue that the international system could remain stable in the absence of a hegemon, thus rebutting hegemonic stability theory.

Robert Keohane

American academic working within the fields of International Relations and International Political Economy.

Keohane in 2017

Following the publication of his influential book After Hegemony (1984), he has become widely associated with the theory of neoliberal institutionalism in international relations, as well as transnational relations and world politics in international relations in the 1970s.

Hegemonic stability theory

Theory of international relations, rooted in research from the fields of political science, economics, and history.

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Keohane's 1984 book After Hegemony used insights from the new institutional economics to argue that the international system could remain stable in the absence of a hegemon, thus rebutting hegemonic stability theory.

New institutional economics

Economic perspective that attempts to extend economics by focusing on the institutions (that is to say the social and legal norms and rules) that underlie economic activity and with analysis beyond earlier institutional economics and neoclassical economics.

This map shows the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita for every country (2020).

Robert Keohane was influenced by NIE, resulting in his influential 1984 work of International Relations, After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy.

Shimer Great Books School

Great Books college that is part of North Central College in Naperville, Illinois.

Frances Shimer (seated) and Cindarella Gregory, 1869
Metcalf Hall (built in 1907) was the main administration building of the Mount Carroll campus, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.
438 N. Sheridan Road, built in 1845, the main building of the Waukegan campus. The former campus was designated a historic district in 2006.
Mortimer Adler, whose great-books philosophy of education influenced Shimer's curriculum; Adler and Robert Maynard Hutchins founded the Great Books Foundation in 1947.
A typical class of seven students seated at an octagonal table (a characteristic of Shimer classrooms), from which the school's logo takes its shape
Shimer students in England; the school has had a study-abroad program in Oxford since 1963.
Shimer professor Adam Kotsko, known for his work on political theology and American popular culture and the author of Awkwardness and Why we Love Sociopaths
The Paul V. Galvin Library in 2011. Designed by architect Walter Netsch in 1962, it is named for the founder of Motorola.
The Assembly, shown here in 2009, grew out of efforts by students and faculty to save the school during the late 1970s.
Shimer students at the Galvin Library; students have access to IIT's student activities.
Arab-Israeli conflict scholar Alan Dowty
Physician, inventor, and Slate columnist Sydney Spiesel

Robert Keohane: Political scientist, international relations scholar and professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs best known for After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy

International political economy

Major subdiscipline of international relations studying the interactions between the economy on a global level and political and economic actors, systems and institutions.

Illustration of the impossible trinity in IPE finance scholarship; inspired by the Mundell-Fleming model in international economics. The theory postulates that a state may not have any more than two of the following policies in place at the same time; a fixed exchange rate, free capital movement, and an independent national monetary policy.

Keohane's 1984 book After Hegemony, used insights from the new institutional economics, to argue that the international system could remain stable in the absence of a hegemon.

Regime theory

Theory within international relations derived from the liberal tradition that argues that international institutions or regimes affect the behavior of states or other international actors.

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Robert Keohane's 1984 book After Hegemony has been described as regime theory's "fullest expression."