Agglutinative language

agglutinativeagglutinatingagglutinating languageagglutinationagglutinative languagesagglutinativityagglutinative morphologyagglutinative structuresanalytic
An agglutinative language is a type of synthetic language with morphology that primarily uses agglutination.wikipedia
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Agglutination

agglutinativeagglutinatedagglutinate
An agglutinative language is a type of synthetic language with morphology that primarily uses agglutination.
Languages that use agglutination widely are called agglutinative languages.

Japanese language

JapaneseJapanese-languageJp
For example, Japanese is generally agglutinative, but displays fusion in otōto, from oto+hito (originally woto+pito), and in its non-affixing verb conjugations. For example, Japanese has very few irregular verbs – only two are significantly irregular, and there are only about a dozen others with only minor irregularity; Ganda has only one (or two, depending on how "irregular" is defined); while in the Quechua languages, all the ordinary verbs are regular.
Japanese is an agglutinative, mora-timed language with simple phonotactics, a pure vowel system, phonemic vowel and consonant length, and a lexically significant pitch-accent.

Luganda

GandaLuganda languageGanda language
For example, Japanese has very few irregular verbs – only two are significantly irregular, and there are only about a dozen others with only minor irregularity; Ganda has only one (or two, depending on how "irregular" is defined); while in the Quechua languages, all the ordinary verbs are regular.
Typologically, it is a highly-agglutinating language with subject–verb–object, word order and nominative–accusative morphosyntactic alignment.

Japanese irregular verbs

irregular verbs
For example, Japanese has very few irregular verbs – only two are significantly irregular, and there are only about a dozen others with only minor irregularity; Ganda has only one (or two, depending on how "irregular" is defined); while in the Quechua languages, all the ordinary verbs are regular.
Japanese verb conjugation is very regular, as is usual for an agglutinative language, but there are a number of exceptions.

Finnish language

FinnishFinnish-languagefi
The uncertain theory about Ural-Altaic proffers that there is a genetic relationship with this proto-language as seen in Finnish, Mongolian and Turkish.
Finnish is a member of the Finnic language family and is typologically between fusional and agglutinative languages.

Fusional language

fusionalinflected languageinflected
This results in generally more easily deducible word meanings if compared to fusional languages, which allow modifications in either or both the phonetics or spelling of one or more morphemes within a word, usually shortening the word or providing easier pronunciation. There seems to exist a preferred evolutionary direction from agglutinative synthetic languages to fusional synthetic languages, and then to non-synthetic languages, which in their turn evolve into isolating languages and from there again into agglutinative synthetic languages.
Fusional languages or inflected languages are a type of synthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by their tendency to use a single inflectional morpheme to denote multiple grammatical, syntactic, or semantic features.

Mongolian language

MongolianMongolKhalkha-Mongolian
The uncertain theory about Ural-Altaic proffers that there is a genetic relationship with this proto-language as seen in Finnish, Mongolian and Turkish.
It is a typical agglutinative language that relies on suffix chains in the verbal and nominal domains.

Quenya

High-elvenQQenya
Some well known constructed languages are agglutinative, such as Esperanto, Klingon, Quenya and Black Speech.
In contrast to early Qenya, the grammar of Quenya was influenced by Finnish, an agglutinative language, but much more by Latin, a synthetic and fusional language, and also Greek, from which he probably took the idea of the diglossia of Quenya with its highly codified variety: the Parmaquesta, used only in certain situations such as literature.

Blackfoot language

BlackfootblaBlackfeet
A majority of Blackfoot morphemes have a one to one correspondence between form and meaning, a defining feature of agglutinative languages.

Georgian language

GeorgianGeorgian:Old Georgian
Georgian is an exception; it is highly agglutinative (with up to eight morphemes per word), but it has a significant number of irregular verbs with varying degrees of irregularity.
Georgian is an agglutinative language.

Drift (linguistics)

driftlinguistic driftcyclic drift
This developmental phenomenon is known as language drift.
Cyclic drift is the mechanism of long-term evolution that changes the functional characteristics of a language over time, such as the reversible drifts from SOV word order to SVO and from synthetic inflection to analytic observable as typological parameters in the syntax of language families and of areal groupings of languages open to investigation over long periods of time.

Korean language

KoreanKorean-languageKorea
Korean has only ten irregular forms of conjugation except for the passive and causative conjugations.
Korean is an agglutinative language.

Proto-Uralic language

Proto-UralicUralicearly Uralic
For example, the Proto-Uralic language, the ancestor of the Uralic languages, was agglutinative, and most descended languages inherit this feature.
Grammatically Proto-Uralic was an agglutinative nominative–accusative language.

Turkish language

TurkishModern TurkishTr
The uncertain theory about Ural-Altaic proffers that there is a genetic relationship with this proto-language as seen in Finnish, Mongolian and Turkish. In Turkish, there is only one irregular noun (su, meaning water), no irregular verbs other than the copular verbs, and two existential particles.
Turkish is an agglutinative language where a series of suffixes are added to the stem word; vowel harmony is a phonological process which ensures a smooth flow, requiring the least amount of oral movement as possible.

Morphology (linguistics)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
The term was introduced by Wilhelm von Humboldt to classify languages from a morphological point of view.
Some languages are isolating, and have little to no morphology; others are agglutinative whose words tend to have lots of easily separable morphemes; others yet are inflectional or fusional because their inflectional morphemes are "fused" together.

Isolating language

isolatinganalyticisolating languages
There seems to exist a preferred evolutionary direction from agglutinative synthetic languages to fusional synthetic languages, and then to non-synthetic languages, which in their turn evolve into isolating languages and from there again into agglutinative synthetic languages.
That linguistic classification is subdivided into the classifications fusional, agglutinative, and polysynthetic, which are based on how the morphemes are combined.

Yakut language

YakutSakhaSakha language
Like most Turkic languages and their ancestral Proto-Turkic, Yakut is an agglutinative language and employs vowel harmony.

Turkic languages

TurkicTurkic languageTurkic-speaking
Turkic languages are null-subject languages, have vowel harmony, extensive agglutination by means of suffixes and postpositions, and lack of grammatical articles, noun classes, and grammatical gender.

Quechuan languages

QuechuaQuechua languageQuechuan
For example, Japanese has very few irregular verbs – only two are significantly irregular, and there are only about a dozen others with only minor irregularity; Ganda has only one (or two, depending on how "irregular" is defined); while in the Quechua languages, all the ordinary verbs are regular.
All varieties of Quechua are very regular agglutinative languages, as opposed to isolating or fusional ones [Thompson].

Kazakh language

KazakhKazkk
Like other Turkic languages, Kazakh is an agglutinative language and it employs vowel harmony.

Nahuatl

Nahuatl languageNáhuatlNahua
The Nahuatl languages are agglutinative, polysynthetic languages that make extensive use of compounding, incorporation and derivation.

Estonian language

EstonianestEstonia
Estonian is a predominantly agglutinative language, but unlike Finnish, it has lost vowel harmony, the front vowels occurring exclusively on the first or stressed syllable, although in older texts and in South Estonian dialects the vowel harmony can still be recognized.

Yuchi language

Yuchiyuc
Like many indigenous American languages, Yuchi grammar is agglutinative.

Inuktitut

Inuktitut languageInuktitukInuktitut writing
(See also: Agglutinative language and Polysynthetic language.) All words begin with a root morpheme to which other morphemes are suffixed.

Sumerian language

Sumerianancient Sumerianeme-sal
Sumerian is an agglutinative, split ergative, and subject-object-verb language.