Aglaurus, daughter of Cecrops

AglaurosAglaurusAglaulosAglaulusAgraulus
Aglaurus (Ancient Greek: Ἄγλαυρος) or Agraulus (Ancient Greek: Ἄγραυλος) was in Greek mythology, an Athenian princess.wikipedia
44 Related Articles

Ceryx

Herald-KeryxKeryx
She had two offspring by two different gods, Alcippe (with Ares) and Ceryx (with Hermes).
In Greek mythology, Ceryx ( Kērux, literally "herald" ) was a son of Hermes and either Pandrosus or Agraulus.

Aglaurus

AglaulusAglaurosAgraulus
Aglaurus was the daughter of Cecrops and another Aglaurus, daughter of Actaeus.

Ares

god of the same namegod of warMars
She had two offspring by two different gods, Alcippe (with Ares) and Ceryx (with Hermes).

Herse of Athens

HerseMercury and Herse
Athena gave the baby in a box to three women—Aglaurus and her two sisters Herse and Pandrosus—and warned them to never open it.
Herse (Ancient Greek:Ἕρση means "dew") was a figure in Greek mythology, daughter of Cecrops, sister to Aglauros and Pandrosos.

Pandrosus

PandrososPandrossousanctuary of Pandrosus
Athena gave the baby in a box to three women—Aglaurus and her two sisters Herse and Pandrosus—and warned them to never open it.
Pandrosos or Pandrosus (Ancient Greek: Πάνδροσος) was known in Greek myth as one of the three daughters of Kekrops, the first king of Athens, along with her sisters Aglauros and Herse.

Athena

Pallas AthenaPallasPallas Athene
later, speaking of "a haunt of Pan": "There the daughters of Aglaurus still tread themeasures of their dance, on the green lawns before the shrine of Pallas (Athena)...". She was particularly associated with the festival of Athena called the Plynteria. According to the Bibliotheca, Hephaestus attempted to rape Athena but was unsuccessful.
The geographer Pausanias records that Athena placed the infant Erichthonius into a small chest (cista), which she entrusted to the care of the three daughters of Cecrops: Herse, Pandrosos, and Aglauros of Athens.

Ephebos

ephebeephebesepheboi
Mythographers believe Aglaurus to have an origin distinct from that of her sisters, due in part to the fact that she had her own sanctuary near the Acropolis, and unlike her sister Pandrosus, was more associated with young men or soldiers (epheboi) than with infants.
After admission to the college, the ephebus took the oath of allegiance, recorded in histories by Pollux and Stobaeus (but not in Aristotle), in the temple of Aglaurus, and was sent to Munichia or Acte to form one of the garrison.

Plynteria

She was particularly associated with the festival of Athena called the Plynteria.
Plynteria (Gr. πλυντήρια) was a festival of ancient Greece celebrated at Athens every year, on the 22nd of Thargelion, in honor of Athena Polias, with the heroine Aglauros (or with the two combined as Athena Aglauros), whose temple stood on the Acropolis.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Aglaurus (Ancient Greek: Ἄγλαυρος) or Agraulus (Ancient Greek: Ἄγραυλος) was in Greek mythology, an Athenian princess.

Greek mythology

GreekGreek mythmythological
Aglaurus (Ancient Greek: Ἄγλαυρος) or Agraulus (Ancient Greek: Ἄγραυλος) was in Greek mythology, an Athenian princess.

Cecrops I

CecropsKekropsCécrops
Aglaurus was the daughter of Cecrops and another Aglaurus, daughter of Actaeus.

Actaeus

ActaeonAktaios
Aglaurus was the daughter of Cecrops and another Aglaurus, daughter of Actaeus.

Alcippe (mythology)

AlcippeAlcippe (Greek mythology)Alkippe
She had two offspring by two different gods, Alcippe (with Ares) and Ceryx (with Hermes).

Hermes

Hermes CriophorusMercuryHermes Psychopompus
She had two offspring by two different gods, Alcippe (with Ares) and Ceryx (with Hermes).

Euripides

EuripideanEuripedesMr. Euripides
Taking the earliest first, Euripides Ion, lines 22–23; 484–485, mentions her, but in the Moses Hadas and John Mclean 1960 Bantam Classics translation they have Euripides say respectively: "(Athena) gave Erichthonius to Aglaurus' daughters (not sisters) to keep."

Pan (god)

PanPanesPans
later, speaking of "a haunt of Pan": "There the daughters of Aglaurus still tread themeasures of their dance, on the green lawns before the shrine of Pallas (Athena)...".

Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)

Pseudo-ApollodorusBibliothecaApollodorus
According to the Bibliotheca, Hephaestus attempted to rape Athena but was unsuccessful.

Hephaestus

HephaistosHephaestoseight spellings
According to the Bibliotheca, Hephaestus attempted to rape Athena but was unsuccessful.

Gaia

GaeaEarthGe
His semen fell on the ground, impregnating Gaia.

Acropolis of Athens

AcropolisAthenian Acropolisthe Acropolis
The sight of the infant caused them both to go insane and they threw themselves off the Acropolis, or, according to Hyginus, into the sea.

Gaius Julius Hyginus

HyginusFabulaeHyginus, Gaius Julius
The sight of the infant caused them both to go insane and they threw themselves off the Acropolis, or, according to Hyginus, into the sea.

Kassandra, Chalkidiki

PalleneKassandraKassandra Peninsula
An alternative version of the same story is that, while Athena was gone bringing a limestone mountain from the Pallene peninsula to use in the Acropolis, the sisters, minus Pandrosus again, opened the box.

Mount Lycabettus

LycabettusLycabettus HillLykabettos
A crow witnessed the opening and flew away to tell Athena, who fell into a rage and dropped the mountain (now Mt. Lykabettos).

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
Athens was at one time involved in a long and protracted war, and an oracle declared that it would cease if someone would sacrifice himself for the good of his country.

Oracle

oraclesoracularseer
Athens was at one time involved in a long and protracted war, and an oracle declared that it would cease if someone would sacrifice himself for the good of his country.