Ahasuerus

King AhasuerusAchashveroshAhasverusKing XerxesAhaseurusKing AchashveroshAhashveroshAmongst othersAssuérusKing Ahasueurus
Ahasuerus (, commonly Achashverosh;, in the Septuagint; Assuerus in the Vulgate) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible, as well as related legends and Apocrypha.wikipedia
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Xerxes I

XerxesXerxes I of PersiaXerxes the Great
The original name was Old Persian Xšaya.āršan (< xšaya 'king' + aršan 'male' > 'king of all male; Hero among Kings').
Xerxes I is one of the Persian kings identified as Ahasuerus in the biblical Book of Esther.

Book of Esther

EstherMegillahAdditions to Esther
Ahasuerus is given as the name of the King of Persia in the Book of Esther.
The biblical Book of Esther is set in the Persian capital of Susa (Shushan) in the third year of the reign of the Persian king Ahasuerus.

List of monarchs of Persia

Shah of IranShahKing of Persia
Ahasuerus is also given as the name of a King of Persia in the Book of Ezra.

Susa

ShushanSusianaSeleucia ad Eulaeum
According to these texts, Nehemiah also lived in Susa during the Babylonian captivity of the 6th century BCE (Daniel mentions it in a prophetic vision), while Esther became queen there, married to King Ahasueurus, and saved the Jews from genocide.

Artaxerxes II of Persia

Artaxerxes IIArtaxerxesArtaxerxes II Mnemon
John of Ephesus and Bar-Hebraeus identified him as Artaxerxes II, a view strongly supported by the 20th century scholar Jacob Hoschander.
Amongst others, it has been suggested that Artaxerxes II was the Ahasuerus mentioned in the Book of Esther.

Darius the Mede

DariusKing Darius
Ahasuerus is given as the name of the father of Darius the Mede in the Book of Daniel.
The mention of Darius is used as a chronological marker, placing the vision in "the first year of Darius son of Ahasuerus".

Wandering Jew

The Wandering JewAhasuerusAhasver
In some versions of the legend of the Wandering Jew, his true name is held to be Ahasuerus.
At least from the 17th century the name Ahasver has been given to the Wandering Jew, apparently adapted from Ahasuerus 'Xerxes,' the Persian king in the Book of Esther, who was not a Jew, and whose very name among medieval Jews was an exemplum of a fool.

Book of Ezra

EzraBook of Esdras1 Esdræ
Ahasuerus is also given as the name of a King of Persia in the Book of Ezra.

Vulgate

Latin VulgateVulgate BibleVulgata
Ahasuerus (, commonly Achashverosh;, in the Septuagint; Assuerus in the Vulgate) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible, as well as related legends and Apocrypha.

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
Ahasuerus (, commonly Achashverosh;, in the Septuagint; Assuerus in the Vulgate) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible, as well as related legends and Apocrypha.

Apocrypha

apocryphalapocryphal booksapocryphal Gospel
Ahasuerus (, commonly Achashverosh;, in the Septuagint; Assuerus in the Vulgate) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible, as well as related legends and Apocrypha.

Babylon

BabilBabelAncient Babylon
The same name is also applied uncertainly to a Babylonian official (or Median king) noted in the Book of Tobit.

Book of Tobit

TobitTobiasBook of Tobias
The same name is also applied uncertainly to a Babylonian official (or Median king) noted in the Book of Tobit.

Old Persian

PersianOld Persian languageancient Persian
The original name was Old Persian Xšaya.āršan (< xšaya 'king' + aršan 'male' > 'king of all male; Hero among Kings').

Akkadian language

AkkadianBabylonianAssyrian
This became Babylonian Aḥšiyaršu (𒄴𒅆𒐊𒅈𒋗, aḫ-ši-ia-ar-šu), then becoming Akšiwaršu (𒀝𒅆𒄿𒈠𒅈𒍪, ak-ši-i-wa 6 -ar-šu), borrowed into Hebrew as אחשורוש ʼĂḥašəwērôš, and thence into Latin as Ahasuerus, the form traditionally used in English Bibles.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The Persian name was independently rendered in Ancient Greek as Ξέρξης Xérxēs.

Achaemenid Empire

AchaemenidPersianPersian Empire
Ahasuerus is given as the name of the King of Persia in the Book of Esther.

Midrash

MidrashimMidrashicMidrash Rabbah
However, the Septuagint, the Vulgate, the Midrash of Esther Rabbah, I, 3 and the Josippon identify the king as Artaxerxes, and the historian Josephus relates that this was the name by which he was known to the Greeks.

Josippon

YosipponSefer YosipponJoseph ben Gorion
However, the Septuagint, the Vulgate, the Midrash of Esther Rabbah, I, 3 and the Josippon identify the king as Artaxerxes, and the historian Josephus relates that this was the name by which he was known to the Greeks.

Artaxerxes I of Persia

Artaxerxes IArtaxerxesArtaxerxes Longimanus
However, the Septuagint, the Vulgate, the Midrash of Esther Rabbah, I, 3 and the Josippon identify the king as Artaxerxes, and the historian Josephus relates that this was the name by which he was known to the Greeks.

Josephus

Flavius JosephusJosephus FlaviusTitus Flavius Josephus
However, the Septuagint, the Vulgate, the Midrash of Esther Rabbah, I, 3 and the Josippon identify the king as Artaxerxes, and the historian Josephus relates that this was the name by which he was known to the Greeks.

Ethiopia

EthiopianAbyssiniaFederal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
The Ethiopic text calls him Arťeksis, usually the Ethiopic equivalent of Artaxerxes.

John of Ephesus

St. John of Ephesus
John of Ephesus and Bar-Hebraeus identified him as Artaxerxes II, a view strongly supported by the 20th century scholar Jacob Hoschander.

Bar Hebraeus

Bar-HebraeusBarhebraeusAbu al-Faraj
John of Ephesus and Bar-Hebraeus identified him as Artaxerxes II, a view strongly supported by the 20th century scholar Jacob Hoschander.

Al-Masudi

al-Mas'udiMasudiAbu al-Hasan 'Alī al-Mas'ūdī
Masudi recorded the Persian view of events which affirms the identification and al-Tabari similarly placed the events during the time of Artaxerxes II despite being confused by the Hebrew name for the king.