A report on Jainism and Ahimsa

The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).
Lord Mahavira, the torch-bearer of ahimsa
Classification of Saṃsāri Jīvas (transmigrating souls) in Jainism
The 5th-century CE Tamil scholar Valluvar, in his Tirukkural, taught ahimsa and moral vegetarianism as personal virtues. The plaque in this statue of Valluvar at an animal sanctuary at Tiruvallur describes the Kural's teachings on ahimsa and non-killing, summing them up with the definition of veganism.
Lord Neminatha, Akota Bronzes (7th century)
Gandhi promoted the principle of Ahimsa by applying it to politics.
Jain miniature painting of 24 tirthankaras, Jaipur, c. 1850
The hand with a wheel on the palm symbolises the Jain Vow of Ahimsa. The word in the middle is Ahimsa. The wheel represents the dharmacakra which stands for the resolve to halt the cycle of reincarnation through relentless pursuit of truth and non-violence.
Jain temple painting explaining Anekantavada with Blind men and an elephant
Buddhist monk peace walk
A Jain monk in meditation, wearing the characteristic white robe and face covering
Nishidhi stone, depicting the vow of sallekhana, 14th century, Karnataka
Praying at the feet of a statue of Bahubali
Jain worship may include ritual offerings and recitals.
Celebrating Das Lakshana (Paryushana), Jain Center of America, New York City
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Shikharji
Idol of Suparśvanātha
A symbol to represent the Jain community was chosen in 1975 as part of the commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of Mahavira’s nirvana.
Rishabhdev, believed to have lived over 592.704×1018 years ago, is considered the traditional founder of Jainism.
The ruins of Gori Jain temples in Nagarparkar, Pakistan, a pilgrimage site before 1947.
Ranakpur Jain Temple
Dilwara Temples
Parshvanath Temple in Khajuraho
Girnar Jain temples
Jal Mandir, Pawapuri
Lodhurva Jain temple
Palitana temples
Saavira Kambada Basadi, Moodbidri, Karnataka
Jain temple, Antwerp, Belgium
Brahma Jinalaya, Lakkundi
Hutheesing Jain Temple

It is a key virtue in the Dhārmic religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Jainism.

- Ahimsa

Jain monks, after positioning themselves in the sublime state of soul consciousness, take five main vows: ahiṃsā (non-violence), satya (truth), asteya (not stealing), brahmacharya (chastity), and aparigraha (non-possessiveness).

- Jainism
The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).

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Image of Tirthankara Parshvanatha (Victoria and Albert Museum, 6th–7th century)

Parshvanatha

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Image of Tirthankara Parshvanatha (Victoria and Albert Museum, 6th–7th century)
Parshvanatha was born in Varanasi, a historic city on the Ganges.
Parshvanatha and his yaksha, Dharanendra, in the 8th-century Tamil Nadu Kalugumalai Jain Beds
8th-century stone relief of Parshvanatha at Thirakoil
Parshvanatha with Padmavati and Dharnendra in a 16th-century manuscript
Parshvanatha iconography is identified by a sesha hood above his head and a cobra stamped (or carved) beneath his feet. At the center of his chest is a shrivatsa, which identifies Jain statues.
Jal Mandir, Shikharji, Parasnath
Parsvanatha ayagapata - Jina Parsvanatha, Mathura art, {{circa|15 CE}}.{{sfn|Quintanilla|2007|p=201}}{{sfn|Quintanilla|2007|p=406}}
alt=Stone relief|Uttar Pradesh, 2nd century (Museum of Oriental Art)
Parshvanath relief of Kahaum pillar, 5th century
alt=Lotus position|5th century (Satna, Madhya Pradesh)
alt=Lotus position|6th century, Uttar Pradesh
alt=Lotus position|7th-century Akota Bronze (Honolulu Museum of Art)
6th-7th century bronze statue in Asian Civilisations Museum
9th century - Cleveland Museum of Art
alt=Lotus position|10th-century copper, inlaid with silver and gemstones (LACMA)
alt=Lotus position|11th century, Maharaja Chhatrasal Museum
alt=Lotus position|Karnataka, 12th century (Art Institute of Chicago)
alt=Lotus position|1813 engraving
{{convert|61|ft}} colossal at Navagraha Jain Temple
alt=Outdoor standing statue|Vahelna statue
alt=Standing statue in niche|Parshvanatha basadi, Shravanabelgola
alt=Standing statue|Parshvanatha temple in Halebidu
Parshvanatha temple, Khajuraho, UNESCO World Heritage Site
Pattadakal Jain Temple, UNESCO World Heritage Site
Parshavanth temple, Jaisalmer Fort, UNESCO World Heritage Site as part of Hill Forts of Rajasthan
Parshvanatha basadi at Halebidu: tentative list for UNESCO World Heritage Site
Calcutta Jain Temple
Antwerp Jain Temple, Belgium
Shri Nakodaji
Samovsaran Mandir, Palitana
Lodhurva Jain temple
Lal Mandir
Kere Basadi
alt=Godiji Parshwanath (Gori) Temple at Tharparkar - tentative list for UNESCO World Heritage|Godiji (Gori) Temple in Tharparkar - tentative list for UNESCO World Heritage
Parshwanath at Jirawala, Rajasthan

Parshvanatha, also known as Parshva and Parasnath, was the 23rd of 24 Tirthankaras (ford-makers or propagators of dharma) of Jainism.

According to the Śvētāmbaras, Mahavira expanded Parshvanatha's first four restraints with his ideas on ahimsa (non-violence) and added the fifth monastic vow (celibacy).

Statue of Mahavira meditating in the lotus position at Shri Mahavirji, Rajasthan, India.

Mahavira

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Statue of Mahavira meditating in the lotus position at Shri Mahavirji, Rajasthan, India.
Mahavira in Padmasana meditation posture
Ancient kingdoms and cities of India at the time of Mahavira
Mahavira in Padmasana meditation posture
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Lord Mahavira's Jal Mandir (water temple) in Pawapuri, Bihar, India
The "Charan Paduka" or foot impression of Mahavira at Jal Mandir
Folio from the Kalpa Sūtra, 15th century
The swastika and five vows
Mahavira worship in a manuscript c.1825
Mahavira iconography is distinguished by a lion stamped (or carved) beneath his feet; a Shrivatsa is on his chest.
Mahavira temple, Tirumalai
alt=See caption|Rock-cut sculpture of Mahavira in Samanar Hills, Madurai, Tamil Nadu
Rock-cut sculpture of Mahavira in Kalugumalai Jain Beds, 8th century
alt=See caption|Tallest known image of the seated Mahavira, Patnaganj
alt=See caption|Four-sided sculpture of Mahavira in Kankali Tila, Mathura
alt=Two nude statues|Tirthankaras Rishabhanatha (left) and Mahavira, 11th century (British Museum)
alt=Mahavira, seated|Temple relief of Mahavira, 14th century (Seattle Asian Art Museum)
alt=See caption|Relief of Mahavira in Thirakoil, Tamil Nadu
16-foot, 2-inch stone statue of Mahavira in Ahinsa Sthal, Mehrauli, New Delhi{{sfn|Titze|1998|p=266}}|alt=Large outdoor statue of Mahavira, with a seated worshipper for scale
alt=See caption|Mahavira statue in Cave 32 of the Ellora Caves
Mahavira inside Ambapuram cave temple, 7th century
alt=Dharmachakra temple|Dharmachakra temple in Gajpanth
alt=Shri Mahavirji|Shri Mahavirji
Jain Center of Greater Phoenix
Jain temple, Potters Bar
Mahavir Swami at Manilaxmi Tirth, Gujarat

Mahavira (Sanskrit: महावीर) also known as Vardhamana, was the 24th Tirthankara (supreme preacher) of Jainism.

His ascetic teachings have a higher order of magnitude than those of Buddhism or Hinduism, and his emphasis on ahimsa (non-violence) is greater than that in other Indian religions.

A Balinese Hindu family after puja at Bratan temple in Bali, Indonesia

Hinduism

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Variously defined as an Indian religion, a set of religious beliefs or practices, a religious tradition, a way of life, or dharma—a religious and universal order by which followers abide.

Variously defined as an Indian religion, a set of religious beliefs or practices, a religious tradition, a way of life, or dharma—a religious and universal order by which followers abide.

A Balinese Hindu family after puja at Bratan temple in Bali, Indonesia
Om, a stylized letter of Devanagari script, used as a religious symbol in Hinduism
Swami Vivekananda was a key figure in introducing Vedanta and Yoga in Europe and the United States, raising interfaith awareness and making Hinduism a world religion.
Ganesha is one of the best-known and most worshipped deities in the Hindu pantheon.
The Hare Krishna group at the Esplanadi Park in Helsinki, Finland
The festival of lights, Diwali, is celebrated by Hindus all over the world.
Hindus in Ghana celebrating Ganesh Chaturti
Holi celebrated at the Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple in Utah, United States.
Kedar Ghat, a bathing place for pilgrims on the Ganges at Varanasi
Priests performing Kalyanam (marriage) of the holy deities at Bhadrachalam Temple, in Telangana. It is one of the temples in India, where Kalyanam is done everyday throughout the year.
A statue of Shiva in yogic meditation.
Basic Hindu symbols: Shatkona, Padma, and Swastika.
Kauai Hindu monastery in Kauai Island in Hawaii is the only Hindu Monastery in the North American continent.
A sadhu in Madurai, India.
The Hindu Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram was built by Narasimhavarman II.
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Hinduism prescribes the eternal duties, such as honesty, refraining from injuring living beings (Ahiṃsā), patience, forbearance, self-restraint, virtue, and compassion, among others.

He includes among "founded religions" Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism that are now distinct religions, syncretic movements such as Brahmo Samaj and the Theosophical Society, as well as various "Guru-isms" and new religious movements such as Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and ISKCON.

Gandhi in London, 1931

Mahatma Gandhi

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Indian lawyer, anti-colonial nationalist and political ethicist who employed nonviolent resistance to lead the successful campaign for India's independence from British rule, and to later inspire movements for civil rights and freedom across the world.

Indian lawyer, anti-colonial nationalist and political ethicist who employed nonviolent resistance to lead the successful campaign for India's independence from British rule, and to later inspire movements for civil rights and freedom across the world.

Gandhi in London, 1931
Gandhi (right) with his eldest brother Laxmidas in 1886.
Gandhi in London as a law student
This bronze statue of Gandhi commemorating the centenary of the incident at the Pietermaritzburg Railway Station was unveiled by Archbishop Desmond Tutu on Church Street, Pietermaritzburg, in June 1993
Gandhi with the stretcher-bearers of the Indian Ambulance Corps during the Boer War.
Gandhi (left) and his wife Kasturba (right) (1902)
Gandhi photographed in South Africa (1909)
Gandhi in 1918, at the time of the Kheda and Champaran Satyagrahas
Gandhi with Dr. Annie Besant en route to a meeting in Madras in September 1921. Earlier, in Madurai, on 21 September 1921, Gandhi had adopted the loin-cloth for the first time as a symbol of his identification with India's poor.
Gandhi spinning yarn, in the late 1920s
Indian workers on strike in support of Gandhi in 1930.
Gandhi and his personal assistant Mahadev Desai at Birla House, 1939
An admiring East End crowd gathers to witness the arrival of Mahatma Gandhi, 1931
In 1946, Gandhi with Jawaharlal Nehru, his designated political heir
Gandhi in 1942, the year he launched the Quit India Movement
Gandhi with Muhammad Ali Jinnah in 1944
Gandhi in 1947, with Louis Mountbatten, Britain's last Viceroy of India, and his wife Edwina Mountbatten
Memorial where Gandhi was assassinated in 1948. His stylised footsteps lead to the memorial.
Gandhi's funeral was marked by millions of Indians.
Cremation of Mahatma Gandhi at Rajghat, 31 January 1948. It was attended by Jawaharlal Nehru, Louis and Edwina Mountbatten, Maulana Azad, Rajkumari Amrit Kaur, Sarojini Naidu and other national leaders. His son Devdas Gandhi lit the pyre.
Gandhi with poet Rabindranath Tagore, 1940
Mohandas K. Gandhi and other residents of Tolstoy Farm, South Africa, 1910
Plaque displaying one of Gandhi's quotes on rumour
"God is truth. The way to truth lies through ahimsa (nonviolence)" – Sabarmati, 13 March 1927
Gandhi picking salt during Salt Satyagraha to defy colonial law giving salt collection monopoly to the British. His satyagraha attracted vast numbers of Indian men and women.
Gandhi with textile workers at Darwen, Lancashire, 26 September 1931
Gandhi's last political protest using fasting, in January 1948
Coverage of the assassination attempt, The Bombay Chronicle, 27 June 1934
Young India, a weekly journal published by Gandhi from 1919 to 1932
Statue of Mahatma Gandhi at York University
Mahatma Gandhi on a 1969 postage stamp of the Soviet Union
Mahatma Gandhi at Praça Túlio Fontoura, São Paulo, Brazil.
Monument to Gandhi in Madrid, Spain
The Gandhi Mandapam, a temple in Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu in India, was erected to honour M.K. Gandhi.
Family tree of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi and Kasturba Gandhi. Source: Gandhi Ashram Sabarmati
Commemorative plaque at 20 Baron's Court Road, Barons Court, London

Gandhi's private secretary noted that "The question of the consistency between his creed of 'Ahimsa' (nonviolence) and his recruiting campaign was raised not only then but has been discussed ever since."

Gandhi grew up in a Hindu and Jain religious atmosphere in his native Gujarat, which were his primary influences, but he was also influenced by his personal reflections and literature of Hindu Bhakti saints, Advaita Vedanta, Islam, Buddhism, Christianity, and thinkers such as Tolstoy, Ruskin and Thoreau.

Rajchandra in Lotus position

Shrimad Rajchandra

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Rajchandra in Lotus position
Shrimad Rajchandra Janma Bhuvan in Vavaniya
Shrimad Rajchandra Vihar located on the Idar hill where Shrimad Rajchandra had given discourses.
The statues of Shrimad Rajchandra and Ambalal which are erected in a room at Nadiad where Atma Siddhi was composed.
A 34-feet idol of Rajchandra at Shrimad Rajchandra Ashram, Dharampur
Stamp released by India Post in 2017

Shrimad Rajchandra (11 November 1867 – 9 April 1901) was a Jain poet, mystic, philosopher, scholar and reformer.

He continued to study other Indian religions and was attracted to Ahimsa (non-violence) doctrine of Jainism.

Lacto-vegetarians consume dairy products, but not eggs or meat.

Lacto vegetarianism

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Diet that abstains from the consumption of meat as well as eggs, while still consuming dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, and kefir.

Diet that abstains from the consumption of meat as well as eggs, while still consuming dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, and kefir.

Lacto-vegetarians consume dairy products, but not eggs or meat.

Lacto-vegetarian diets are popular with certain followers of the Eastern religious traditions such as Jainism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.

The core of their beliefs behind a lacto-vegetarian diet is the law of ahimsa, or non-violence.