Ahoy!

Ion International
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Type-in program

type-intype-in programsgame code that could be typed into a computer
It was noted for the quality and learnability of its type-in program listings.
Magazines such as Softalk, Compute!, ANALOG Computing, and Ahoy! dedicated much of each issue to type-in programs.

Computer magazine

Computer magazinesmagazinemagazines
Ahoy! was a computer magazine published between January 1984 and January 1989 that focused on all Commodore International color computers, but especially the Commodore 64 and Amiga.

Commodore International

CommodoreCommodore Business MachinesCommodore 64
Ahoy! was a computer magazine published between January 1984 and January 1989 that focused on all Commodore International color computers, but especially the Commodore 64 and Amiga.

Commodore 64

C6464Commodore
Ahoy! was a computer magazine published between January 1984 and January 1989 that focused on all Commodore International color computers, but especially the Commodore 64 and Amiga.

Amiga

Commodore AmigaAmiga ComputerAmiga 500/600 (OCS/ECS)
Ahoy! was a computer magazine published between January 1984 and January 1989 that focused on all Commodore International color computers, but especially the Commodore 64 and Amiga.

BASIC

BASIC programming languageGOSUBcompiled BASIC
It published many games in BASIC and machine language, occasionally also printing assembly language source code.

Checksum

checksumscheck sumcheck-sum
Ahoy! published a checksumming program called Flankspeed for entering machine language listings.

Coleco Adam

AdamAdam Computer
Ahoy! reported that Coleco had not shipped by early October because of various problems.

World of Commodore

World of AmigaWorld of Commodore Amiga
Industry exhibitors included Abacus Software, Ahoy!, Commodore Business Machines, Digital Solutions, Electronic Arts, Gold Disk, Grolier, McGraw-Hill Ryerson, TPUG, Watcom, and WordPro distributor Norland Agencies.

Atari ST

Atari STESTAtari 1040ST
In 1984 Ahoy! had written that Tramiel "had never been able to establish very good relations with computer dealers ... Under his reign, computer retailers have accused Commodore of treating them as harshly as if they were suppliers or competitors".

Gridrunner

Gridrunner iOS
Ahoy! called Attack of the Mutant Camels the product of "a fiendish mind", with "serviceable" graphics ("so if you're wondering what a mutant camel really looks like, forget it") and excellent sound effects, and concluded that it was "all in all, a fine game".

The Robotic Workshop

Access Software announced The Robotic Workshop in the January 1987 issue of Ahoy! magazine.

Blue Max 2001

Ahoy! called the C64 release an "exciting sequel" which "extends and refines the elements which made the original game popular, while it introduces enough new challenges to generate fresh excitement."

Repton (1983 video game)

ReptonRepton (Sirius Software)Repton'' (1983 computer game)
Ahoy! in 1984 gave Repton grades of B for graphics and C+ for gameplay.

Commodore SX-64

SX-64Executive 64
Ahoy! favorably reviewed the SX-64, stating that the keyboard was better than the 64's, the monitor "isn't hard to read at all", and the disk drive was durable enough for travel.

Beach Head (video game)

Beach HeadBeach-HeadBeach Head'' (video game)
Ahoy! stated "This game is a blast".

Lode Runner

Power Lode RunnerLode Runner ClassicLoderunner
Ahoy! in 1984 called the game "a top-notch action game that requires both a quick mind and an agile joystick".

Indiana Jones in the Lost Kingdom

Robert J. Sodaro of Ahoy! wrote, "I must admit, the lure of the Lost Kingdom is strong, but having to fumble through several sessions without direction almost sent me hying back to civilization. No documentation may have sounded good in the planning stages, but at the game-playing stage, engaging and coherent instructions would have sounded much better. If you have the tenacity to muddle through, however, you'll find much enjoyment in accompanying Indy on his further adventures. A fellow reviewer once wrote that a good game was one he'd return to play after the review was written. For me, Indiana Jones is one of those games."

Enchanter (video game)

EnchanterEnchanter'' (video game)
Ahoy! wrote that "Enchanter is filled with the usual Infocom doses of wit, red herrings ... twists, turns, and surprises".

The Print Shop

Print ShopPrintShop
Ahoy!s reviewer called the Commodore 64 version of The Print Shop "one of the best thought out, easiest to use packages I've come across", reporting that he did not need to use the manual to produce his first greeting cards.

Jack Tramiel

Jacek TrzmielTramel Technology LtdTramiel
Ahoy! wrote after his departure that although Tramiel's "obsession with controlling the cost of every phase of the manufacturing process" had led to record profits during the home computer price war, his "inflexible one-man rule" had resulted in poor dealer relations and "a steady turnover of top executives at Commodore".

Castle Wolfenstein

Silas WarnerCastle SmurfensteinReturn to Castle Wolfenstein
Ahoy! criticized the Commodore 64 version's slow load times and annoying wall-collision detection, but called Castle Wolfenstein "addicting. I am not all that big on killing everything that moves, but I really got caught up in the adventure".