Ain't

Aint
The word ain't is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular.wikipedia
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Eliza Doolittle

ElizaElizabeth "Eliza" DoolittleLiza Doolittle
A notable exponent of the term is Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle from George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion; "I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman" said Doolittle.
Her Cockney dialect includes words that are common among working class Londoners, such as ain't; "I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman" said Doolittle.

African-American Vernacular English

Ebonicsjiveblack vernacular
Ain't meaning didn't is widely considered a feature unique to African American Vernacular English, although it can be found in some dialects of Caribbean English as well.
Use of ain't as a general negative indicator. As in other dialects, it can be used where most other dialects would use am not, isn't, aren't, haven't, and hasn't. However, in marked contrast to other varieties of English in the US, some speakers of AAVE also use ain't instead of don't, doesn't, or didn't (e.g., I ain't know that). Ain't had its origins in common English but became increasingly stigmatized since the 19th century. See also amn't.

Tag question

tag questionsquestion tagtag-question
Standard dialects that regard ain't as non-standard often substitute aren't for am not in tag questions (e.g., "I'm doing okay, aren't I?"), while leaving the "amn't gap" open in declarative statements.
nonstandard dialects: Clever, ain't I?

English auxiliaries and contractions

auxiliary verbcontractedauxiliaries
Linguistically, ain't is formed by the same rule that English speakers use to form aren't and other contractions of auxiliary verbs.
The contraction ain't may stand for am not, among its other uses. For details see the next section, and the separate article on ain't.

Cockney

cockney accentCockney EnglishCockney dialect
A notable exponent of the term is Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle from George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion; "I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman" said Doolittle.
Use of ain't

Culture of the United Kingdom

British cultureBritish cultural iconsBritish popular culture
Michael Caine is a notable exponent, as is Eliza Doolittle in Pygmalion (My Fair Lady), whose dialect includes words that are common among working-class Londoners, such as ain't: "I ain't done nothing wrong", said Doolittle.

List of English words with disputed usage

Disputed usagedisputedFrequently misused words
ain't – originally a contraction of "am not", this word is widely used as a replacement for "aren't", "isn't", "haven't" and "hasn't" as well. While ain't has existed in the English language for a very long time, and it is a common, normal word in many dialects in both North America and the British Isles, it is not a part of standard English, and its use in formal writing is not recommended by most usage commentators. Nevertheless, ain't is used by educated speakers and writers for deliberate effect, what Oxford American Dictionary describes as "tongue-in-cheek" or "reverse snobbery", and what Merriam-Webster Collegiate calls "emphatic effect" or "a consistently informal style".

Register (sociolinguistics)

registerregisterslinguistic register
For example, when speaking in a formal setting, an English speaker may be more likely to use features of prescribed grammar than in an informal setting—such as pronouncing words ending in -ing with a velar nasal instead of an alveolar nasal (e.g. "walking", not "walkin'"), choosing more formal words (e.g. father vs. dad, child vs. kid, etc.), and refraining from using words considered nonstandard, such as ain't.

New Orleans Saints

New OrleansSaintsNew Orleans Saint
In 1980, the Saints lost their first 14 games, prompting local sportscaster Bernard "Buddy D" Diliberto to advise Saints supporters to wear paper bags over their heads at the team's home games; many bags rendered the club's name as the "'Aints" rather than the "Saints."

Suffer This: A Compilation of Boston's Backwash

Guitarist Sluggo went on to found the bands Ain't and The Grannies in San Francisco, CA.

Appalachian English

AppalachianOzark accentdialect
The use of the word ain't is also one of the most salient features of this dialect.

List of North American football nicknames

"Ain'ts*" – New Orleans Saints, NFL; rhyming play on the non-standard English negative ain't

Black Country

The Black Countrylocal accentBlack Country area
Ain't is in common use as when "I haven't seen her" becomes "I ay sid 'er."

Ant (disambiguation)

Ant
Ain't, of which "an't" is an obsolete spelling

September 1961

September 12, 1961September 29moratorium on testing
The word "ain't" was accepted into the English language with the publication of the Third Edition of the Merriam-Webster, the first completely new edition since 1944. Merriam President Gordon J. Oallan had announced the controversial decision on September 6, noting that "ain't" was one of thousands of new words that had been added.

Irregardless

A counterexample is provided in ain't, which has an "ancient genealogy" at which scholars have not leveled such criticisms.

Contraction (grammar)

contractioncontractionscontracted
The word ain't is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular.

Vernacular

vernacular languagevernacular languagesvernacularization
The word ain't is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular.

Antecedent (grammar)

antecedentantecedentsgrammatical antecedent
Ain't has several antecedents in English, corresponding to the various forms of to be not and to have not that ain't contracts.

Elision

elideddeletionelide
As the "mn" combination of two nasal consonants is disfavoured by many English speakers, the "m" of amn't began to be elided, reflected in writing with the new form an't.