The word ain't is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular.
ain'tAint

Eliza Doolittle

ElizaElizabeth "Eliza" DoolittleLiza Doolittle
A notable exponent of the term is Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle from George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion; "I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman" said Doolittle.
Her Cockney dialect includes words that are common among working class Londoners, such as ain't; "I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman" said Doolittle.

African-American Vernacular English

Ebonicsjiveblack vernacular
Ain't meaning didn't is widely considered a feature unique to African American Vernacular English, although it can be found in some dialects of Caribbean English as well.

Tag question

tag questiontag questionsquestion tag
Standard dialects that regard ain't as non-standard often substitute aren't for am not in tag questions (e.g., "I'm doing okay, aren't I?"), while leaving the "amn't gap" open in declarative statements.

English auxiliaries and contractions

auxiliary verbcontractedauxiliaries
Linguistically, ain't is formed by the same rule that English speakers use to form aren't and other contractions of auxiliary verbs.
Ain't (described in more detail in the article ain't) is a colloquialism and contraction for "am not", "is not", "was not" "are not", "were not" "has not", and "have not".

Cockney

cockneycockney accentCockney dialect
A notable exponent of the term is Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle from George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion; "I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman" said Doolittle. In the nineteenth century, ain't was often used by writers to denote regional dialects such as Cockney English.

Culture of the United Kingdom

British cultureBritish cultural iconsBritish
Michael Caine is a notable exponent, as is Eliza Doolittle in Pygmalion (My Fair Lady), whose dialect includes words that are common among working-class Londoners, such as ain't: "I ain't done nothing wrong", said Doolittle.

List of English words with disputed usage

Disputed usagelist of English words with disputed usageFrequently misused words

Register (sociolinguistics)

registerregisterslinguistic register
For example, when speaking in a formal setting, an English speaker may be more likely to use features of prescribed grammar than in an informal setting—such as pronouncing words ending in -ing with a velar nasal instead of an alveolar nasal (e.g. "walking", not "walkin'"), choosing more formal words (e.g. father vs. dad, child vs. kid, etc.), and refraining from using words considered nonstandard, such as ain't.

New Orleans Saints

New OrleansSaintsNew Orleans Saint
In 1980, the Saints lost their first 14 games, prompting local sportscaster Bernard "Buddy D" Diliberto to advise Saints supporters to wear paper bags over their heads at the team's home games; many bags rendered the club's name as the "'Aints" rather than the "Saints."

Suffer This: A Compilation of Boston's Backwash

Guitarist Sluggo went on to found the bands Ain't and The Grannies in San Francisco, CA.

Appalachian English

AppalachiandialectSouthern Appalachian dialect
The use of the word ain't is also one of the most salient features of this dialect.

Black Country

Black CountryThe Black Countrylocal accent
Ain't is in common use as when "I haven't seen her" becomes "I ay sid 'er."

September 1961

September 12, 1961September 29moratorium on testing

Irregardless

irregardless
A counterexample is provided in ain't, which has an "ancient genealogy" at which scholars have not leveled such criticisms.

Contraction (grammar)

contractioncontractionscontracted
The word ain't is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular.

Vernacular

vernacularvernacular languagevernacular languages
The word ain't is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular.

Linguistic prescription

prescriptiveprescriptive grammarlinguistic prescription
The usage of ain't is a continuing subject of controversy in English.

Antecedent (grammar)

antecedentantecedentsgrammatical antecedent
Ain't has several antecedents in English, corresponding to the various forms of to be not and to have not that ain't contracts.