Aiol and Mirabel

Aiol
Aiol and Mirabel is an Old French chanson de geste.wikipedia
25 Related Articles

Elie de Saint Gille

The manuscript, BnF Français 25516, also contains a version of Elie de Saint Gille, and is possibly from the library of Margaret of Flanders, Duchess of Brabant; the two are called the "small cycle" of Saint-Gilles.
With Aiol and Mirabel, it forms the 'small cycle of Saint-Gilles'.

Chanson de geste

chansons de gesteCarolingian legendschansons
Aiol and Mirabel is an Old French chanson de geste.

BnF Français 25516

The manuscript, BnF Français 25516, also contains a version of Elie de Saint Gille, and is possibly from the library of Margaret of Flanders, Duchess of Brabant; the two are called the "small cycle" of Saint-Gilles.

Old French

FrenchMedieval FrenchOF
Aiol and Mirabel is an Old French chanson de geste.

Middle Dutch

Middle Dutch languageDutch, MiddleMiddle
It was translated into Middle Dutch, Italian, and Spanish.

Saracen

SaracensSaracenicArab conquest
The narrative recounts the adventures of the young knight Aiol who attempts to restore his father's fiefdom, and along the way marries a Saracen princess.

Philip II of France

Philip AugustusPhilip IIPhilip II Augustus
The poem may have been performed in 1212 at the court of Philip II of France, on the occasion of a royal wedding. A version of the two poems may have been presented in 1212 at the court of Philip II of France, during wedding festivities for Baldwin of Flander's daughter Joan and Ferdinand, Count of Flanders.

Louis the Pious

Louis ILouisLouis I the Pious
Dressed in the rusty armor of his father, goes to the court of Louis the Pious to restore his father's good name and have his fiefdom returned to him.

Ganelon

Gano of Maganza
All is well that ends well: Mibrien converts to Christianity, Makaire is quartered (like Ganelon ), Aiol and Mirabel, and his father Elie, go back to Burgundy; the two sons go to Venice.

Decasyllable

decasyllabicdecasyllabic verseten-syllable
Metrically, it has two distinctly different parts—the first in decasyllables (divided 6/4, an unusual measure ), the second in alexandrines.

French alexandrine

alexandrinealexandrine versealexandrin
Metrically, it has two distinctly different parts—the first in decasyllables (divided 6/4, an unusual measure ), the second in alexandrines.

Margaret of Flanders, Duchess of Brabant

Margaret of FlandersMargaret
The manuscript, BnF Français 25516, also contains a version of Elie de Saint Gille, and is possibly from the library of Margaret of Flanders, Duchess of Brabant; the two are called the "small cycle" of Saint-Gilles.

Picardy

PicardiePicardPicardy region
It was written 1275-90 and hails from Picardie, but is based on a version probably written around 1170.

Baldwin I, Latin Emperor

Baldwin I of ConstantinopleBaldwin IBaldwin of Flanders
A version of the two poems may have been presented in 1212 at the court of Philip II of France, during wedding festivities for Baldwin of Flander's daughter Joan and Ferdinand, Count of Flanders.

Joan, Countess of Flanders

JeanneJoanJoan of Constantinople
A version of the two poems may have been presented in 1212 at the court of Philip II of France, during wedding festivities for Baldwin of Flander's daughter Joan and Ferdinand, Count of Flanders.

Ferdinand, Count of Flanders

FerdinandFerdinand of FlandersFerdinand of Portugal
A version of the two poems may have been presented in 1212 at the court of Philip II of France, during wedding festivities for Baldwin of Flander's daughter Joan and Ferdinand, Count of Flanders.

Jacques Normand

An edition of the poem was first published by Jacques Normand and Gaston Raynaud in France.

Wendelin Förster

Wendelin Foerster
Shortly after, an edition of the poem, coupled with Elie de Saint-Gilles, was published by Austrian philologist Wendelin Förster in 1876–1882 (and republished, unaltered, by Martin Sändig, Wiesbaden, 1967) An English edition and translation, by Sandra C. Malicote and A. Richard Hartman, was published in 2014.

Andrea da Barberino

Andrea di BarberinoReali di Francia
The first dates from the end of the 14th century and is a prose romance by Andrea da Barberino; B. Finet-van der Schaaf surmises this is based on a now-lost Italian version.

Multilingualism

bilingualmultilingualpolyglot
Scholars have noted the multilingualism which is quite prevalent throughout the poem.

Aliscans

Catherine M. Jones, grouping Aiol and Mirabel with seven other chansons de geste (including Aliscans and La Prise d'Orange) that have important "polyglot motif[s]", says that the description of Mirabel (she speaks fourteen languages ) is characteristic of the trope.

Prise d'Orange

his seizure of the town of OrangeLa Prise d'Orange
Catherine M. Jones, grouping Aiol and Mirabel with seven other chansons de geste (including Aliscans and La Prise d'Orange) that have important "polyglot motif[s]", says that the description of Mirabel (she speaks fourteen languages ) is characteristic of the trope.