Aircraft

heavier-than-airheavier-than-air flightheavier-than-air aircraftaerodyneairheavier than airairplaneheavier-than-air craftair trafficplanes
An aircraft is a vehicle that is able to fly by gaining support from the air.wikipedia
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Powered lift

Powered-liftdownward thrustpowered lift systems
It counters the force of gravity by using either static lift or by using the dynamic lift of an airfoil, or in a few cases the downward thrust from jet engines. There are two ways to produce dynamic upthrust — aerodynamic lift, and powered lift in the form of engine thrust.
Powered lift or powered-lift refers to a type of aircraft that can take off and land vertically and functions differently from a rotorcraft in horizontal flight.

Flight

flyingflyflies
An aircraft is a vehicle that is able to fly by gaining support from the air.
Many things can fly, from natural aviators such as birds, bats, and insects, to human inventions like aircraft, including airplanes, helicopters, balloons, and rockets which may carry spacecraft.

Vehicle

vehiclesvehicularroad vehicle
An aircraft is a vehicle that is able to fly by gaining support from the air.
Vehicles include wagons, bicycles, motor vehicles (motorcycles, cars, trucks, buses), railed vehicles (trains, trams), watercraft (ships, boats), amphibious vehicles (screw-propelled vehicle, hovercraft), aircraft (airplanes, helicopters) and spacecraft.

Airship

dirigibleairshipsdirigibles
Common examples of aircraft include airplanes, helicopters, airships (including blimps), gliders, paramotors and hot air balloons.
An aerostat is an aircraft that remains aloft using buoyancy or static lift, as opposed to the aerodyne, which obtains lift by moving through the air.

Aviation

air transportairflying
The human activity that surrounds aircraft is called aviation.
Aviation, or air transport, refers to the activities surrounding mechanical flight and the aircraft industry.

Unmanned aerial vehicle

UAVdronedrones
The science of aviation, including designing and building aircraft, is called aeronautics. Crewed aircraft are flown by an onboard pilot, but unmanned aerial vehicles may be remotely controlled or self-controlled by onboard computers.
An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) (or uncrewed aerial vehicle, commonly known as a drone) is an aircraft without a human pilot on board and a type of unmanned vehicle.

Aircraft pilot

pilotaviatorpilots
The science of aviation, including designing and building aircraft, is called aeronautics. Crewed aircraft are flown by an onboard pilot, but unmanned aerial vehicles may be remotely controlled or self-controlled by onboard computers.
An aircraft pilot or aviator is a person who controls the flight of an aircraft by operating its directional flight controls.

Hot air balloon

hot-air balloonhot air balloonsballoon
Common examples of aircraft include airplanes, helicopters, airships (including blimps), gliders, paramotors and hot air balloons.
As with all aircraft, hot air balloons cannot fly beyond the atmosphere.

Aircrew

flight crewcrewcrews
The science of aviation, including designing and building aircraft, is called aeronautics. Crewed aircraft are flown by an onboard pilot, but unmanned aerial vehicles may be remotely controlled or self-controlled by onboard computers.
Aircrew, also called flight crew, are personnel who operate an aircraft while in flight.

Aeronautics

aeronauticalaeronautaeronautic
The science of aviation, including designing and building aircraft, is called aeronautics. Crewed aircraft are flown by an onboard pilot, but unmanned aerial vehicles may be remotely controlled or self-controlled by onboard computers.
Aeronautics is the science or art involved with the study, design, and manufacturing of air flight capable machines, and the techniques of operating aircraft and rockets within the atmosphere.

Early flying machines

flying machineList of early flying machinesEarly flight
Early flying machines include all forms of aircraft studied or constructed before the development of the modern aeroplane by 1910.

Powered aircraft

powered flightpropeller aircraftaircraft propulsion
Aircraft may be classified by different criteria, such as lift type, aircraft propulsion, usage and others.
A powered aircraft is an aircraft that uses onboard propulsion with mechanical power generated by an aircraft engine of some kind.

Aviation in World War I

World War IWorld War I aircraftair warfare
World War I was the first major conflict involving the large-scale use of aircraft.

Helicopter

helicoptersrotorcraftchopper
Common examples of aircraft include airplanes, helicopters, airships (including blimps), gliders, paramotors and hot air balloons.
In July 1901, the maiden flight of Hermann Ganswindt's helicopter took place in Berlin-Schöneberg; this was probably the first heavier-than-air motor-driven flight carrying humans.

Kite

kiteskite flyingkite-flying
Small hot-air balloons, called sky lanterns, were first invented in ancient China prior to the 3rd century BC and used primarily in cultural celebrations, and were only the second type of aircraft to fly, the first being kites, which were first invented in ancient China over two thousand years ago.
A kite is a tethered heavier-than-air craft with wing surfaces that react against the air to create lift and drag.

Fixed-wing aircraft

fixed-wingaircraftfixed wing
Aerodynamic lift involving wings is the most common, with fixed-wing aircraft being kept in the air by the forward movement of wings, and rotorcraft by spinning wing-shaped rotors sometimes called rotary wings.
A fixed-wing aircraft is a flying machine, such as an airplane or aeroplane (see spelling differences), which is capable of flight using wings that generate lift caused by the aircraft's forward airspeed and the shape of the wings.

Rotorcraft

rotary-wing aircraftrotary-wingrotary wing
Aerodynamic lift involving wings is the most common, with fixed-wing aircraft being kept in the air by the forward movement of wings, and rotorcraft by spinning wing-shaped rotors sometimes called rotary wings.
A rotorcraft or rotary-wing aircraft is a heavier-than-air flying machine that uses lift generated by wings, called rotary wings or rotor blades, that revolve around a mast.

Aerodynamics

aerodynamicaerodynamicistsubsonic
There are two ways to produce dynamic upthrust — aerodynamic lift, and powered lift in the form of engine thrust.
Most of the early efforts in aerodynamics were directed toward achieving heavier-than-air flight, which was first demonstrated by Otto Lilienthal in 1891.

Rocket

rocketsrocketryrocket scientist
A pure rocket is not usually regarded as an aerodyne, because it does not depend on the air for its lift (and can even fly into space); however, many aerodynamic lift vehicles have been powered or assisted by rocket motors.
A rocket (from Italian rocchetto "bobbin") is a missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine.

Wright brothers

Orville WrightWilbur WrightOrville and Wilbur Wright
They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft with the Wright Flyer on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

History of human-powered aircraft

human-powered aircrafthuman-powered flightHuman powered aircraft
Man-powered aircraft also rely on ground effect to remain airborne with a minimal pilot power, but this is only because they are so underpowered—in fact, the airframe is capable of flying higher.
HPAs are aircraft belonging to the class of vehicles known as human-powered vehicles.

Powered paragliding

paramotorspowered paragliderparamotoring
Common examples of aircraft include airplanes, helicopters, airships (including blimps), gliders, paramotors and hot air balloons.
Hydrocopters, hovercraft, and aircraft are the only ways to travel in such conditions.

Aerostat

aerostatslighter than airenvelope
Aerostats use buoyancy to float in the air in much the same way that ships float on the water.
Aerostats are so named because they use aerostatic lift which is a buoyant force that does not require movement through the surrounding air mass. This contrasts with the heavy aerodynes that primarily use aerodynamic lift which requires the movement of a wing surface through the surrounding air mass. The term has also been used in a narrower sense, to refer to the statically tethered balloon in contrast to the free-flying airship.

Tiltrotor

tilt-rotortilt rotortiltrotor aircraft
Tiltrotor aircraft (such as the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey), tiltwing, tail-sitter, and coleopter aircraft have their rotors/propellers horizontal for vertical flight and vertical for forward flight.
A tiltrotor is an aircraft which generates lift and propulsion by way of one or more powered rotors (sometimes called proprotors) mounted on rotating engine pods or nacelles usually at the ends of a fixed wing or an engine mounted in the fuselage with drive shafts transferring power to rotor assemblies mounted on the wingtips.

Ground-effect vehicle

ekranoplanground effect vehicleground effect
Wing-in-ground-effect vehicles are not considered aircraft.
A GEV is sometimes characterized as a transition between a hovercraft and an aircraft, although this is not correct as a hovercraft is statically supported upon a cushion of pressurised air from an onboard downward-directed fan.