Ajñana

Ajnana''' (ancient Indian philosophy)AjnaninsAjñaninsIndian Sceptic
Ajñana was one of the nāstika or "heterodox" schools of ancient Indian philosophy, and the ancient school of radical Indian skepticism.wikipedia
47 Related Articles

Śramaṇa

SramanaShramanaSramanic
It was a Śramaṇa movement and a major rival of early Buddhism, Jainism and the Ājīvika school.
The śramaṇa tradition includes Jainism, Buddhism, and others such as the Ājīvikas, Ajñanas and Cārvākas.

Pre-sectarian Buddhism

early Buddhismattainment of insightthe deathless
It was a Śramaṇa movement and a major rival of early Buddhism, Jainism and the Ājīvika school.
The śramaṇas gave rise to different religious and philosophical schools, among which pre-sectarian Buddhism itself, Yoga and similar schools of Hinduism, Jainism, Ājīvika, Ajñana and Cārvāka were the most important, and also to popular concepts in all major Indian religions such as saṃsāra (endless cycle of birth and death) and moksha (liberation from that cycle).

Āstika and nāstika

AstikaĀstikaNastika
Ajñana was one of the nāstika or "heterodox" schools of ancient Indian philosophy, and the ancient school of radical Indian skepticism.

Sanjaya Belatthiputta

Sanjaya BelatthaputtaSañjaya BelaṭṭhaputtaEel-Wrigglers' (Pali: amarā-vikheppikā)
While these three schools seem to have valued mental equanimity, it appears that the fourth school of Sceptics, associated with the philosopher Sanjaya Belatthiputta, did not share this value.
He was contemporaneous with Mahavira, Makkhali Gosala and the Buddha, and was a proponent of the sceptical ajñana school of thought.

Sariputta

SariputraSāriputtaŚāriputra
Indeed, two of the foremost disciples of Buddha, Sariputta and Moggallāna, were initially the students of Sanjaya; and a strong element of skepticism is found in early Buddhism, most particularly in the Aṭṭhakavagga sutra.
Sañjaya is described as a teacher in the Indian Sceptic tradition.

Ājīvika

AjivikaAjivikasAjivaka
It was a Śramaṇa movement and a major rival of early Buddhism, Jainism and the Ājīvika school.

Jayarāśi Bhaṭṭa

Jayarasi BhattaJayaraashi BhattaJayarashi Bhatta
Since skepticism is a philosophical attitude and a style of philosophising rather than a position, the Ajñanins may have influenced other skeptical thinkers of India like Nagarjuna, Jayarāśi Bhaṭṭa, and Shriharsha.
This methodology makes him aligned to the Ajñanins of ancient India and Nagarjuna.

Catuṣkoṭi

Catuskotifour conceptual extremesthe four extremes
A notable commonality among all these schools is the arrangement of propositions according to five-fold logic, alongside the usual two-fold mode and the four-fold mode (catuṣkoṭi) common in Pali Nikayas.
Śākyamuni, as remembered by Ānanda and codified in the Brahmajala Sutta 2.27, when expounding the sixteenth wrong view, or the fourth wrong view of the 'Eel-Wrigglers' (Pali: amarā-vikheppikā), the non-committal equivocators who adhered to Ajñana, the sceptical philosophy, though the grammatical structure is identical to the Catuṣkoṭi (and there are numerous other analogues of this fourfold grammatical structure within this Sutta), the intentionality of the architecture employed by Nagarjuna is not evident, as rendered into English by Walshe (1987, 1995: p.

Charvaka

CārvākaCarvakaLokayata
Though there is evidence of its development in Vedic era, Charvaka school of philosophy predated the Āstika schools as well as a philosophical predecessor to subsequent or contemporaneous philosophies such as Ajñana, Ājīvika, Jainism and Buddhism in the classical period of Indian philosophy.

Pyrrho

Pyrrho of ElisOutlines of PyrrhonismPyrrhonic
According to Diogenes Laërtius, the Greek philosopher Pyrrho developed his skeptical philosophy in India when Pyrrho was there during the conquest of Alexander the Great.
It has been hypothesized that the gymnosophists were Jains, or Ajnanins, and that these are likely influences on Pyrrho.

Pyrrhonism

PyrrhonistPyrrhonian skepticismPyrrhonists
According to Diogenes Laërtius, the Greek philosopher Pyrrho developed his skeptical philosophy in India when Pyrrho was there during the conquest of Alexander the Great.

Hindu philosophy

Hindu philosopherdarsanasDarshanas
Ajñana was one of the nāstika or "heterodox" schools of ancient Indian philosophy, and the ancient school of radical Indian skepticism.

Philosophical skepticism

skepticismscepticismskeptical hypothesis
Ajñana was one of the nāstika or "heterodox" schools of ancient Indian philosophy, and the ancient school of radical Indian skepticism.

Jainism

JainJainsJaina
It was a Śramaṇa movement and a major rival of early Buddhism, Jainism and the Ājīvika school. The Ajñana view points are recorded in Theravada Buddhism's Pāli Canon in the Brahmajala Sutta and Samaññaphala Sutta and in the Sūyagaḍaṃga of Jainism.

Theravada

Theravada BuddhismTheravādaTheravada Buddhist
The Ajñana view points are recorded in Theravada Buddhism's Pāli Canon in the Brahmajala Sutta and Samaññaphala Sutta and in the Sūyagaḍaṃga of Jainism.

Pāli Canon

Pali CanoncanonicalTipiṭaka
The Ajñana view points are recorded in Theravada Buddhism's Pāli Canon in the Brahmajala Sutta and Samaññaphala Sutta and in the Sūyagaḍaṃga of Jainism.

Brahmajala Sutta (Theravada)

Brahmajala SuttaBrahmajala SutraBrahmajāla Sutta
The Ajñana view points are recorded in Theravada Buddhism's Pāli Canon in the Brahmajala Sutta and Samaññaphala Sutta and in the Sūyagaḍaṃga of Jainism.

Samaññaphala Sutta

Samannaphala SuttaSāmaññaphala SuttaSamaññaphala
The Ajñana view points are recorded in Theravada Buddhism's Pāli Canon in the Brahmajala Sutta and Samaññaphala Sutta and in the Sūyagaḍaṃga of Jainism.

Sutrakritanga

SūtrakrtangaSutrakrutang sutraSûtrakritânga Sûtra
The Ajñana view points are recorded in Theravada Buddhism's Pāli Canon in the Brahmajala Sutta and Samaññaphala Sutta and in the Sūyagaḍaṃga of Jainism.

Nasadiya Sukta

Hymn of CreationNasadiya10.129
The traces of scepticism can be found in Vedic sources such as in the Nasadiya hymn and hymn to sraddha (faith) in Rigveda.

Rigveda

Rig VedaRigvedicRig-Veda
The traces of scepticism can be found in Vedic sources such as in the Nasadiya hymn and hymn to sraddha (faith) in Rigveda.

Yajnavalkya

YājñavalkyaYagnavalkyaYajñavalkya
In Brahmanas and Early Upanishads doubt regarding a person's existence after death is cast, while the Yajñavalkya argued for the impossibility of knowing the ultimate reality or the atman.

Gorgias

Encomium of HelenGorgias of LeontiniGorgianic
Regarding this passage and the maxims on knowledge, Jayatilleke compares the Sceptic's views with that of the Greek sophist Gorgias, as given in his book "Nature or the Non-existent," and proposes that the Sceptics may have arrived at their position using similar lines of reasoning.

Maudgalyayana

MoggallanaMoggallānaMaudgalyāyana
Indeed, two of the foremost disciples of Buddha, Sariputta and Moggallāna, were initially the students of Sanjaya; and a strong element of skepticism is found in early Buddhism, most particularly in the Aṭṭhakavagga sutra.

Atthakavagga and Parayanavagga

Atthaka VaggaAṭṭhakavagga and
Indeed, two of the foremost disciples of Buddha, Sariputta and Moggallāna, were initially the students of Sanjaya; and a strong element of skepticism is found in early Buddhism, most particularly in the Aṭṭhakavagga sutra.