Ajax the Great

AjaxTelamonian AjaxAiaslegendary Greek heroAjax, son of TelamonA-JaxAevasAias/AjaxAjax Skull-splitterGreek hero
Ajax or Aias ( or ; Greek Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος Aiantos; archaic ΑΣϜΑϺ ) is a mythological Greek hero, the son of King Telamon and Periboea, and the half-brother of Teucer.wikipedia
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Trojan War

Troyfall of Troysiege of Troy
He plays an important role, and is portrayed as a towering figure and a warrior of great courage in Homer's Iliad and in the Epic Cycle, a series of epic poems about the Trojan War.
After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse.

Iliad

The IliadHomericHomer’s Iliad
He plays an important role, and is portrayed as a towering figure and a warrior of great courage in Homer's Iliad and in the Epic Cycle, a series of epic poems about the Trojan War.
Hector duels with Ajax, but nightfall interrupts the fight, and both sides retire.

Teucer

TefkrosTeucriTeucros
Ajax or Aias ( or ; Greek Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος Aiantos; archaic ΑΣϜΑϺ ) is a mythological Greek hero, the son of King Telamon and Periboea, and the half-brother of Teucer. He is the cousin of Achilles, and is the elder half-brother of Teucer.
He fought alongside his half-brother, Ajax, in the Trojan War and is the legendary founder of the city of Salamis on Cyprus.

Ajax the Lesser

AjaxAjax, son of OileusLocrian Ajax
He is also referred to as "Telamonian Ajax" (Αἴας ὁ Τελαμώνιος, in Etruscan recorded as Aivas Tlamunus), "Greater Ajax", or "Ajax the Great", which distinguishes him from Ajax, son of Oileus (Ajax the Lesser).
He was called the "lesser" or "Locrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon.

Telamon

Telemon
Ajax or Aias ( or ; Greek Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος Aiantos; archaic ΑΣϜΑϺ ) is a mythological Greek hero, the son of King Telamon and Periboea, and the half-brother of Teucer. Ajax is the son of Telamon, who was the son of Aeacus and grandson of Zeus, and his first wife Periboea.
In the Iliad, he was the father of Greek heroes Ajax the Great and Teucer by different mothers.

Periboea

Periboiaher mother
Ajax or Aias ( or ; Greek Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος Aiantos; archaic ΑΣϜΑϺ ) is a mythological Greek hero, the son of King Telamon and Periboea, and the half-brother of Teucer.
Periboea, was the daughter of either King Cychreus of Salamis or of Alcathous, her mother in the latter case being either Pyrgo or Evaechme, daughter of Megareus. She was ravished by Telamon who then fled away; when her father learned of that, he ordered for her to be cast in the sea, but the guard who was to perform that took pity on her and sold her away; the one who bought her happened to be Telamon. She became by him mother of Ajax. She was among the would-be sacrificial victims of Minotaur; while on board the ship, Minos attempted to sexually abuse her but she was defended by Theseus, with whom she later consorted. Also known as Eriboea.

Alcibiades

AlcibiadeAlkibiadeshist
Many illustrious Athenians, including Cimon, Miltiades, Alcibiades and the historian Thucydides, traced their descent from Ajax.
Alcibiades' mother was Deinomache, the daughter of Megacles, head of the powerful Alcmaeonid family, and could trace her family back to Eurysaces and the Telamonian Ajax.

Aeacus

AiakosAeacus ''(Aiakos)
Ajax is the son of Telamon, who was the son of Aeacus and grandson of Zeus, and his first wife Periboea.
He was the father of Peleus, Telamon and Phocus and was the grandfather of the Trojan war warriors Achilles and Telemonian Ajax.

Achilles

tragic championA'''chillesAchilles and Troilus
He is the cousin of Achilles, and is the elder half-brother of Teucer. Unlike Diomedes, Agamemnon, and Achilles, Ajax appears as a mainly defensive warrior, instrumental in the defence of the Greek camp and ships and that of Patroclus' body.
Agamemnon agrees and sends Odysseus and two other chieftains, Ajax and Phoenix, to Achilles with the offer of the return of Briseis and other gifts.

Diomedes

Diomedehero of the same namemyth
Unlike Diomedes, Agamemnon, and Achilles, Ajax appears as a mainly defensive warrior, instrumental in the defence of the Greek camp and ships and that of Patroclus' body.
In Homer's Iliad Diomedes is regarded alongside Ajax the Great as one of the best warriors of all the Achaeans (behind only Achilles in prowess).

Chiron

Cheiron2060 ChironC
Known as the "bulwark of the Achaeans", he was trained by the centaur Chiron (who had trained Ajax's father Telamon and Achilles's father Peleus and would later die of an accidental wound inflicted by Heracles, whom he was at the time training), at the same time as Achilles.
Among his pupils were many culture heroes: Asclepius, Aristaeus, Ajax, Aeneas, Actaeon, Caeneus, Theseus, Achilles, Jason, Peleus, Telamon, Perseus, sometimes Heracles, Oileus, Phoenix, and in one Byzantine tradition, even Dionysus.

Odysseus

UlyssesUlisseKing of Ithaca
In Book 9, Agamemnon and the other Mycenaean chiefs send Ajax, Odysseus and Phoenix to the tent of Achilles in an attempt to reconcile with the great warrior and induce him to return to the fight.
Telamonian Ajax ("The Greater"), however, is the volunteer who eventually fights Hector.

Ajax (play)

AjaxAjax'' (play)Sophocles' ''Ajax
In Sophocles' play Ajax, a famous retelling of Ajax's demise, after the armor is awarded to Odysseus, Ajax feels so insulted that he wants to kill Agamemnon and Menelaus.
The play depicts the fate of the warrior Ajax, after the events of the Iliad but before the end of the Trojan War.

Suicide of Ajax Vase

Ajaxsuicidesuicide of Ajax
The Belvedere Torso, a marble torso now in the Vatican Museums, is considered to depict Ajax "in the act of contemplating his suicide".
The Suicide of Ajax Vase depicting the suicide of Ajax a "neck amphora" in shape, and painted in the black-figure style.

Hector

HektormythTrojan prince and warrior
In the Iliad, Ajax is notable for his abundant strength and courage, seen particularly in two fights with Hector.
Thus, Protesilaus, Ajax, and Odysseus would not land.

Menelaus

King MenelausMenelaosher husband
Ajax, assisted by Menelaus, succeeds in fighting off the Trojans and taking the body back with his chariot; however, the Trojans have already stripped Patroclus of Achilles' armor.
Among the contenders were Odysseus, Menestheus, Ajax the Great, Patroclus, and Idomeneus.

Belvedere Torso

The Belvedere Torso, a marble torso now in the Vatican Museums, is considered to depict Ajax "in the act of contemplating his suicide".
Though traditionally identified as a Heracles seated on the skin of the Nemean lion, recent studies have identified the skin as that of a panther, occasioning other identifications (possibilities include Hercules, Polyphemus and Marsyas, among others.) According to the Vatican Museum website "the most favoured hypothesis identifies it with Ajax, the son of Telamon, in the act of contemplating his suicide".

Patroclus

PatroklosPatroclesGreek spy
Unlike Diomedes, Agamemnon, and Achilles, Ajax appears as a mainly defensive warrior, instrumental in the defence of the Greek camp and ships and that of Patroclus' body.
Achilles retrieved his body, which had been stripped of armor by Hector and protected on the battlefield by Menelaus and Ajax.

Phoenix (son of Amyntor)

PhoenixPhoinix
In Book 9, Agamemnon and the other Mycenaean chiefs send Ajax, Odysseus and Phoenix to the tent of Achilles in an attempt to reconcile with the great warrior and induce him to return to the fight.
In Homer's Iliad, Phoenix, along with Odysseus and Ajax, urges Achilles to re-enter battle.

Ajaccio

a legendAjaccio, CorsicaAjaccio, France
There is a legend that Ajax founded the city of Ajaccio in the mediterranean island of Corsica (now part of France) and gave it his name.
Among these, the most prestigious suggests that the city was founded by the Greek legendary hero Ajax and named after him.

List of suicides in fiction

List of suicides in fiction
Ajax the Great, a character from the Greek mythology, stabs himself with a sword (his death is described by Sophocles, Pindar and Ovid; the suicide is, however, only implied in Homer when, in the Odyssey, the ghost of Ajax refuses to speak to Odysseus in Hades).

Phorcys of Phrygia

Phorcys
Ajax is responsible for the death of many Trojan lords, including Phorcys.
He was killed in battle by the Greek hero Ajax.

Rhoiteion

RhoeteanRhoeteum
His ashes were deposited in a golden urn on the Rhoetean promontory at the entrance of the Hellespont.
Rhoiteion was best known in Antiquity for the Tomb of Ajax, the Greek hero who had died during the Trojan Wars, which was located in the west of its territory near the war memorial at İn Tepe (not to be confused with the town of the same name to the north-east).

Salamis Island

SalamisSalaminaSalamineans
He was disowned by his father and was not allowed to return to his home, the island of Salamis off the coast of Athens.
Ajax the Great, the legendary king of Salamis island, son of Telamon and half-brother of Teucer

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Ajax or Aias ( or ; Greek Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος Aiantos; archaic ΑΣϜΑϺ ) is a mythological Greek hero, the son of King Telamon and Periboea, and the half-brother of Teucer.