Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar (15 October 1542– 27 October 1605 ), popularly known as Akbar I, also as Akbar the Great (Akbar-i-azam ), was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605.
AkbarAkbar the GreatEmperor AkbarJalaluddin Muhammed AkbarMughal Emperor AkbarJalal-ud-Din Muhammad AkbarJalaluddin Muhammad AkbarJalal ud-Din Muhammad AkbarJalaluddin Mohammad AkbarJalal-uddin Mohammad Akbar

Fatehpur Sikri

FatehpurFatehpūr SikrīFatehpur Sikri, Uttar Pradesh
Akbar's courts at Delhi, Agra, and Fatehpur Sikri became centres of the arts, letters, and learning.
The city itself was founded as the capital of Mughal Empire in 1571 by Emperor Akbar, serving this role from 1571 to 1585, when Akbar abandoned it due to a campaign in Punjab and was later completely abandoned in 1610.

Bairam Khan

Bairam KhanBairam Khan-i-KhananBehrám Khán
Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India.
Bairam Khan also Bayram Khan was an important military commander, later commander-in-chief of the Mughal army, a powerful statesman and regent at the court of the Mughal Emperors, Humayun and Akbar.

Birbal

BirbalRaja BirbalMahesh Das
One famous courtier who followed this blended religion was Birbal.
Birbal (born Mahesh Das; 1528–1586), or Raja Birbal, was a Hindu advisor in the court of the Mughal emperor, Akbar.

Hamida Banu Begum

Hamida BanoHamida Banu Begum (Mariam Makani)Nawab Hamida Banu Begum Sahiba
There he met and married the then 14-year-old Hamida Banu Begum, daughter of Shaikh Ali Akbar Jami, a teacher of Humayun's younger brother Hindal Mirza.
Hamida Banu Begum ( 1527 – 29 August 1604, ) was a wife of the second Mughal emperor Humayun and the mother of his successor, the third Mughal emperor Akbar.

Jahangir

JahangirSalimJehangir
Akbar was succeeded as emperor by his son, Prince Salim, later known as Jahangir.
Prince Salim, later Jahangir, was born on 31 August 1569, in Fatehpur Sikri, to Akbar and Jodha Bai.

Mughal architecture

MughalMughal styleMughal architectural style
Perso-Islamic culture began to merge and blend with indigenous Indian elements, and a distinct Indo-Persian culture emerged characterized by Mughal style arts, painting, and architecture.
His grandson Akbar built widely, and the style developed vigorously during his reign.

Din-i Ilahi

Dīn-i IlāhīDin E Elahi
Disillusioned with orthodox Islam and perhaps hoping to bring about religious unity within his empire, Akbar promulgated Din-i-Ilahi, a syncretic creed derived mainly from Islam and Hinduism as well as some parts of Zoroastrianism and Christianity.
"Religion of God") was a syncretic religion propounded by the Mughal emperor Akbar in 1582 CE, intending to merge the best elements of the religions of his empire, and thereby reconcile the differences that divided his subjects.

Ruqaiya Sultan Begum

RuqaiyaRuqaiya Begum
Out of affection for the memory of his brother, Humayun betrothed Hindal's nine-year-old daughter, Ruqaiya Sultan Begum, to his son Akbar.
Ruqaiya Sultan Begum (alternative spelling: Ruqayya, Ruqayyah) ( 1542 – 19 January 1626) was empress consort of the Mughal Empire from 1557 to 1605 as the first wife and chief consort of the third Mughal emperor Akbar.

Kalanaur, Punjab, India

Kalanaur
In Kalanaur, Punjab, the 14-year-old Akbar was enthroned by Bairam Khan on a newly constructed platform, which still stands.
The town has historical significance as Mughal Emperor Akbar, was enthroned in a garden near the Kalanaur by Bairam Khan.

Hindal Mirza

Hindal
There he met and married the then 14-year-old Hamida Banu Begum, daughter of Shaikh Ali Akbar Jami, a teacher of Humayun's younger brother Hindal Mirza.
He was also the older brother of Gulbadan Begum (the author of Humayun-nama), the younger half-brother of the second Mughal emperor Humayun, as well as the paternal uncle and father-in-law of the third Mughal emperor Akbar.

Maham Anga

Maham Anaga
Urged on by his foster mother, Maham Anga, and his relatives, Akbar decided to dispense with the services of Bairam Khan.
Maham Anga (died 1562) was the chief nurse of the Mughal emperor Akbar.

Umerkot

AmarkotUmerkoatUmerkot
Jalal ud-din Muhammad Akbar was born the next year on 15 October 1542 (the fourth day of Rajab, 949 AH) at the Rajput Fortress of Umerkot in Sindh (in modern-day Pakistan), where his parents had been given refuge by the local Hindu ruler Rana Prasad.
The city was the birthplace of the Mughal Emperor Akbar.

Humayun

HumayunEmperor HumayunNasiruddin Muhammad Humayun
Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India. Defeated in battles at Chausa and Kannauj in 1539 to 1540 by the forces of Sher Shah Suri, Mughal emperor Humayun fled westward to Sindh.
Subsequently, Humayun further expanded the Empire in a very short time, leaving a substantial legacy for his son, Akbar.

Adham Khan

Adham Khan Koka
A Mughal army under the command of his foster brother, Adham Khan, and a Mughal commander, Pir Muhammad Khan, invaded Malwa.
Adham Khan (1531 – 16 May 1562) was a general of Akbar.

Abu'l-Fazl ibn Mubarak

Abul FazlAbul FazalAbu'l-Fazl
Such was the impact of these weapons that Akbar's Vizier, Abul Fazl, once declared that "with the exception of Turkey, there is perhaps no country in which its guns has more means of securing the Government than [India]."
Shaikh Abu al-Fazal ibn Mubarak also known as Abu'l-Fazl, Abu'l Fadl and Abu'l-Fadl 'Allami (14 January 1551 – 12 August 1602) was the Grand vizier of the Mughal emperor Akbar, and author of the Akbarnama, the official history of Akbar's reign in three volumes, (the third volume is known as the Ain-i-Akbari) and a Persian translation of the Bible.

Sher Shah Suri

Sher Shah SuriSher ShahSher Khan
Defeated in battles at Chausa and Kannauj in 1539 to 1540 by the forces of Sher Shah Suri, Mughal emperor Humayun fled westward to Sindh.
His reorganization of the empire laid the foundations for the later Mughal emperors, notably Akbar, son of Humayun.

Farooqi dynasty

Miran Muhammad Shah IKhandeshFaruqi
The Afghan ruler, Baz Bahadur, was defeated at the Battle of Sarangpur and fled to Khandesh for refuge leaving behind his harem, treasure, and war elephants.
The Farooqi dynasty' (also spelt Farooqui, Faruqi) was the ruling dynasty of the Khandesh sultanate from its inception in 1382 till its annexation by the Mughal emperor Akbar in 1601.

Mughal emperors

Mughal emperorMughalEmperor
Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar (15 October 1542– 27 October 1605 ), popularly known as Akbar I, also as Akbar the Great (Akbar-i-azam ), was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605.
Only the first two Mughal emperors, Babur and Humayun, were fully Central Asian (Turkic people), whereas Akbar was half-Persian (his mother was of Persian origin), Jahangir was half-Rajput and quarter-Persian, and Shah Jahan was three-quarters Rajput.

Agra

AgraAkbarabadAgra, UP
Akbar's courts at Delhi, Agra, and Fatehpur Sikri became centres of the arts, letters, and learning.
It was known then as Akbarabād and remained the capital of the Mughal Empire under the Badshahs Akbar, Jahāngīr and Shāh Jahān.

Umarkot Fort

Rajput Fortress
Jalal ud-din Muhammad Akbar was born the next year on 15 October 1542 (the fourth day of Rajab, 949 AH) at the Rajput Fortress of Umerkot in Sindh (in modern-day Pakistan), where his parents had been given refuge by the local Hindu ruler Rana Prasad.
is a fort located in Umerkot, Sindh, also called Amarkot(undefined), Emperor Akbar was born in Umarkot Fort when his father Humayun fled from the military defeats at the hands of Sher Shah Suri on 15 October 1542.

Mansabdar

mansabmansabdarmansabs
The Mansabdari system in particular has been acclaimed for its role in upholding Mughal power in the time of Akbar.
The Mansabdari system was the administrative system of the Mughal Empire introduced by Akbar.

Buland Darwaza

Buland Darwāza
Having established his authority over Gujarat, Akbar returned to Fatehpur Sikiri, where he built the Buland Darwaza to commemorate his victories, but a rebellion by Afghan nobles supported by the Rajput ruler of Idar, and the renewed intrigues of the Mirzas forced his return to Gujarat.
Buland Darwaza (बुलंद दरवाज़ा, undefined ), or the "Gate of victory", was built in 1572 A.D. by Mughal emperor Akbar to commemorate his victory over Gujarat.

Battle of Haldighati

battle of Haldighati1579Punja
Udai Singh's son and successor, Pratap Singh, was later defeated by the Mughals at the Battle of Haldighati in 1576.
The Battle of Haldighati was a battle fought on 18 June 1576 between cavalry and archers supporting the Rana of Mewar, Maharana Pratap; and the Mughal emperor Akbar's forces, led by Man Singh I of Amber.

Siege of Chittorgarh (1567–1568)

Siege of Chittorgarh1567–1568Patta
Chittorgarh fell on February 1568 after a siege of four months.
Forces led by Akbar surrounded and besieged 8,000 Rajputs and around 40,000 peasants under the command of Jaimal in Chittorgarh.

Muzaffar Shah III

The king, Muzaffar Shah III, was caught hiding in a corn field; he was pensioned off by Akbar with a small allowance.
Mughal Emperor Akbar annexed Gujarat in his empire in 1573.