Al Davis (boxer)

Al "Bummy" DavisAl DavisBummy Davis
Al "Bummy" Davis (January 26, 1920 in New York, N.Y. – November 21, 1945 in Brooklyn, N.Y.), born Albert Abraham Davidoff, was an American lightweight and welterweight boxer who fought from 1937 to 1945.wikipedia
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Lightweight

lightlight weightlightweight boxer
Al "Bummy" Davis (January 26, 1920 in New York, N.Y. – November 21, 1945 in Brooklyn, N.Y.), born Albert Abraham Davidoff, was an American lightweight and welterweight boxer who fought from 1937 to 1945.
Notable lightweight boxers Katie Taylor, Alexis Argüello, Henry Armstrong, Ken Buchanan, Tony Canzoneri, Pedro Carrasco, Joel Casamayor, Al "Bummy" Davis, Oscar De La Hoya, Roberto Durán, Artur Grigorian, Joe Gans, Benny Leonard, Ray Mancini, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Juan Manuel Marquez, Sugar Shane Mosley, Miguel Ángel González, Carlos Ortiz, Edwin Valero, Pernell Whitaker, Manny Pacquiao, and Ike Williams.

Brownsville, Brooklyn

BrownsvilleBrownsville, New YorkBrownsville, Brooklyn, New York
Davis grew up in the rough and tough, then-predominantly Jewish Brownsville section of Brooklyn.

Lou Ambers

Louis J. (Lou Ambers) D’Ambrosio
First, he lost a unanimous decision before 20,586 Madison Square Garden fans, to lightweight king Lou Ambers who took all but the second and fourth rounds in a non-title match on February 23, 1940.
Ambers sought a rematch, and after a tune up win over Al "Bummy" Davis, he again faced Jenkins.

Beau Jack

He lost a ten round decision to former lightweight champion Beau Jack on March 17 of that same year, before 19,963 fans at Madison Square Garden.
On March 17, 1944, he defeated Al "Bummy" Davis, the "Brooklyn Bomber", at Madison Square Garden before a crowd of nearly 20,000, in a ten-round unanimous decision.

List of Jews in sports

List of select Jewish fencersList of select Jewish tennis playersList of select Jewish baseball players
*List of select Jewish boxers

Bob Montgomery (boxer)

Bob Montgomery
Davis' last victory over a name fighter came on February 18, 1944, before an audience of 17,654, at the expense of former and future NYSAC lightweight champion and future boxing hall-of-famer Bob Montgomery, who he knocked out in the first round.
Montgomery lost to Al "Bummy" Davis at Madison Square Garden in a non-title bout before 17,654 fans in a first-round KO on February 18, 1944.

Rocky Graziano

Graziano
Davis' last big fight came against future middleweight champion Rocky Graziano, who achieved a technical knockout against him in the fourth round of a May 12, 1945 match at Madison Square Garden before a crowd of 15,656.

Welterweight

welterwelter weightWelterweight Title
Al "Bummy" Davis (January 26, 1920 in New York, N.Y. – November 21, 1945 in Brooklyn, N.Y.), born Albert Abraham Davidoff, was an American lightweight and welterweight boxer who fought from 1937 to 1945.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Davis grew up in the rough and tough, then-predominantly Jewish Brownsville section of Brooklyn.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn, New YorkBrooklyn, NYKings
Davis grew up in the rough and tough, then-predominantly Jewish Brownsville section of Brooklyn.

Confectionery store

candy storesweet shopcandy shop
His father ran a produce pushcart and later owned a candy store during the 1920s, Prohibition days.

Prohibition in the United States

ProhibitionProhibition eraProhibition-era
His father ran a produce pushcart and later owned a candy store during the 1920s, Prohibition days.

New York City Police Department

NYPDNew York Police DepartmentNew York City Police
Davis' job, as a young boy of seven, was to keep lookout for the police and give the alert to his father to hide bottles of whiskey being sold on the sly.

Whisky

whiskeywhiskiesage statement
Davis' job, as a young boy of seven, was to keep lookout for the police and give the alert to his father to hide bottles of whiskey being sold on the sly.

Murder, Inc.

Murder, IncMurder IncorporatedMurder Inc.
Davis developed into a tough, street-smart young man, and became well known in a neighborhood that was famed as the home of Murder, Inc. His two brothers were affiliated with the notorious gang, acting as collectors.

Abe Reles

Abe "Kid Twist" RelesAbraham Reles
In fact, he was one of the few young men in the neighborhood who was unafraid to stand up to feared local hoodlums like Murder, Inc.'s Abe Reles.

Hebrew language

HebrewHebrew grammarHeb.
His mother called him "Vroomeleh," an affectionate diminutive of his Hebrew name, Avrum (Hebrew for his middle name, Abraham), and he was known to friends and family in his neighborhood as "Vroomy."

Promoter (entertainment)

promotermusic promoterpromotion
When Al was a teenager, a boxing promoter convinced him to change his nickname to "Bummy;" the promoter felt that it sounded tougher and would draw a larger crowd.

Hook (boxing)

hookhooksleft hook
Davis was a rough slugger with one of the most powerful left hooks in boxing history.

The Ring (magazine)

The RingRing MagazineThe Ring'' magazine
His record was 66 wins, with 47 KOs, 10 losses and 4 draws, and he was named to Ring Magazine's list of "100 Greatest Punchers of All Time".

Knockout

technical knockoutTKOKO
His record was 66 wins, with 47 KOs, 10 losses and 4 draws, and he was named to Ring Magazine's list of "100 Greatest Punchers of All Time". He made a name for himself when he scored a three-round technical knockout over the great, but aging former lightweight champion Tony Canzoneri on November 1, 1939 at Madison Square Garden.

Tony Canzoneri

He made a name for himself when he scored a three-round technical knockout over the great, but aging former lightweight champion Tony Canzoneri on November 1, 1939 at Madison Square Garden.

Boxing

boxerboxersprofessional boxer
First, he lost a unanimous decision before 20,586 Madison Square Garden fans, to lightweight king Lou Ambers who took all but the second and fourth rounds in a non-title match on February 23, 1940. Davis was a rough slugger with one of the most powerful left hooks in boxing history.

Championship

championshipstitlePremiers
First, he lost a unanimous decision before 20,586 Madison Square Garden fans, to lightweight king Lou Ambers who took all but the second and fourth rounds in a non-title match on February 23, 1940.