Al Jolson

JolsonA. JolsonAsa Yoelson / Al Jolson, as a boyJoleyThe Al Jolson Show
Al Jolson (born Asa Yoelson; May 26, 1886 – October 23, 1950) was an American singer, comedian, and actor.wikipedia
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The Jolson Story

The Al Jolson StoryJolson Story, The
After a period of inactivity, his stardom returned with The Jolson Story (1946), for which Larry Parks played Jolson, with the singer dubbing for Parks.
The Jolson Story is a 1946 American Technicolor musical biography film which purports to tell the life story of singer Al Jolson.

Larry Parks

After a period of inactivity, his stardom returned with The Jolson Story (1946), for which Larry Parks played Jolson, with the singer dubbing for Parks.
His best known role was Al Jolson, whom he portrayed in two films: The Jolson Story (1946) and Jolson Sings Again (1949).

The Jazz Singer

1927 film19271927 film version
Although best remembered today as the star of the first talking picture, The Jazz Singer (1927), he starred in a series of successful musical films during the 1930s.
The film features six songs performed by Al Jolson.

Blackface

black faceblacked upblackface minstrelsy
Jolson has been dubbed "the king of blackface" performers, a theatrical convention since the mid-19th century.
White people who performed in blackface in film included Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor, Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Buster Keaton, Joan Crawford, Irene Dunne, Doris Day, Milton Berle, William Holden, Marion Davies, Myrna Loy, Betty Grable, Dennis Morgan, Laurel and Hardy, Betty Hutton, The Three Stooges, Mickey Rooney, Shirley Temple, Judy Garland, Donald O'Connor and Chester Morris and George E. Stone in Boston Blackie's Rendezvous.

Jolson Sings Again

The formula was repeated in a sequel, Jolson Sings Again (1949).
Jolson Sings Again is a 1949 American musical biographical film directed by Henry Levin, and the sequel to The Jolson Story, both of which cover the life of singer Al Jolson.

La Belle Paree

According to Esquire magazine, "J.J. Shubert, impressed by Jolson's overpowering display of energy, booked him for La Belle Paree, a musical comedy that opened at the Winter Garden in 1911. Within a month Jolson was a star. From then until 1926, when he retired from the stage, he could boast an unbroken series of smash hits."
La Belle Paree was a musical revue that launched the legitimate theatre career of Al Jolson.

Winter Garden Theatre

Winter Garden TheaterWinter GardenWinter Garden Theatre (1850)
According to Esquire magazine, "J.J. Shubert, impressed by Jolson's overpowering display of energy, booked him for La Belle Paree, a musical comedy that opened at the Winter Garden in 1911. Within a month Jolson was a star. From then until 1926, when he retired from the stage, he could boast an unbroken series of smash hits."
The show starred Al Jolson and launched him on his highly successful singing and acting career.

My Mammy

Mammy
Jolson added "My Mammy".
Though associated with Al Jolson, who performed the song very successfully, "My Mammy" was performed first in 1918 by William Frawley (later to become famous on I Love Lucy) as a vaudeville act.

William Morris Agency

William MorrisLeonard HirshanJorge Pinos
The brothers worked for the William Morris Agency.
Stars such as Charlie Chaplin, Al Jolson, the Marx Brothers, and Mae West were all represented by the company.

Swanee (song)

SwaneeSuwanneeSwanee" (song)
"Swanee" was added to the show and became composer George Gershwin's first hit recording.
It is most often associated with singer Al Jolson.

The Singing Fool

With Warner Bros. Al Jolson made his first "all-talking" picture, The Singing Fool (1928), the story of an ambitious entertainer who insisted on going on with the show even as his small son lay dying.
The Singing Fool is a 1928 American musical drama Part-Talkie motion picture directed by Lloyd Bacon which was released by Warner Bros. The film stars Al Jolson and is a follow-up to his previous film, The Jazz Singer.

George Gershwin

GershwinGeorgeG. Gershwin
"Swanee" was added to the show and became composer George Gershwin's first hit recording.
Al Jolson, a famous Broadway singer of the day, heard Gershwin perform "Swanee" at a party and decided to sing it in one of his shows.

Sinbad (musical)

SinbadSinbad'' (musical)
In 1918, his acting career was pushed further after he starred in the hit musical Sinbad.
Sinbad is a Broadway musical with a book and lyrics by Harold R. Atteridge and music by Sigmund Romberg, Al Jolson and others.

Mammy (film)

MammyMammy'' (film)
These included Say It with Songs (1929), Mammy (1930), and Big Boy (1930).
Mammy (1930) is an American pre-Code musical drama film with Technicolor sequences, released by Warner Bros. The film starred Al Jolson and was a follow-up to his previous film, Say It with Songs (1929).

New Century Theatre

Jolson's 59th Street TheatreJolson TheatreNBC Century Theatre
It led Lee Shubert to rename his theater Jolson's 59th Street Theatre.
The house, which seated 1,700, was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp for the Shuberts, who originally named it Jolson's 59th Street Theatre after Al Jolson, who opened the venue with a Sigmund Romberg musical called Bombo on October 6, 1921.

A Plantation Act

Al Jolson in "A Plantation Act.
Before The Jazz Singer, Jolson starred in the talking film A Plantation Act.
A Plantation Act (1926) is an early Vitaphone sound-on-disc short film starring Al Jolson, the first film that Jolson starred in.

Ohev Sholom - The National Synagogue

Ohev Sholom CongregationTalmud Torah CongregationCongregation Ohev Sholom
By 1894, Moses Yoelson could afford to pay the fare to bring Nechama and their four children to the U.S. By the time they arrived—as steerage passengers on the SS Umbria arriving at the Port of New York on April 9, 1894—he had found work as a cantor at Talmud Torah Congregation in the Southwest Waterfront neighborhood of Washington, D.C., where the family was reunited.
Ohev Sholom Talmud Torah was formed in 1958 as a merger between Ohev Sholom Congregation, founded as Chai Adon Congregation in 1886, and Talmud Torah Congregation (the synagogue in which the father of Al Jolson once served as cantor), founded three years later.

Avalon (Al Jolson song)

AvalonAvalon" (Al Jolson song)
It stars Jolson, Alice Faye and Tyrone Power, and included many of Jolson's best known songs, although several songs were cut to shorten the movie's length, including "April Showers" and "Avalon".
"Avalon" is a 1920 popular song written by Al Jolson, Buddy DeSylva and Vincent Rose referencing Avalon, California.

Wonder Bar

filmed in 1934
In 1934, he starred in a movie version of his earlier stage play Wonder Bar, co-starring Kay Francis, Dolores del Río, Ricardo Cortez, and Dick Powell.
It stars Al Jolson, Kay Francis, Dolores del Río, Ricardo Cortez, Dick Powell, Guy Kibbee, Ruth Donnelly, Hugh Herbert, Louise Fazenda, Fifi D'Orsay, Merna Kennedy, Henry O'Neill, Robert Barrat, Henry Kolker, and Spencer Charters in the main roles.

Say It with Songs

These included Say It with Songs (1929), Mammy (1930), and Big Boy (1930).
The film stars Al Jolson and was a follow-up to his previous film, The Singing Fool (1928).

Hallelujah, I'm a Bum (film)

Hallelujah, I'm a Bum
Warner Bros. allowed him to make Hallelujah, I'm a Bum with United Artists in 1933.
The film stars Al Jolson as Bumper, a popular New York tramp, and both romanticizes and satirizes the hobo lifestyle into which many people were forced by the economic conditions of the time.

California, Here I Come

California Here I Come
Reviewers wrote, "Mr Jolson's singing of Mammy, California, Here I Come and others is something for the memory book" and "Of the three co-stars this is Jolson's picture... because it's a pretty good catalog in anybody's hit parade."
"California, Here I Come" is a song written for the 1921 Broadway musical Bombo, starring Al Jolson.

Cardinal Gibbons School (Baltimore, Maryland)

Cardinal Gibbons SchoolCardinal GibbonsSt. Mary's Industrial School for Boys
He spent time at the St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys, a progressive reformatory/home for orphans run by the Xaverian Brothers in Baltimore (the same school which would later be attended by Babe Ruth).
* Al Jolson † (St.

George Jessel (actor)

George JesselGeorgie Jessel George Jessel
Warner Bros. picked George Jessel for the role, as he had starred in the Broadway play.
However, when the studio refused his salary demands, Jessel turned down the movie role, which was eventually played by Al Jolson.

Ricardo Cortez

Jacob KrantzRichard Cortez
In 1934, he starred in a movie version of his earlier stage play Wonder Bar, co-starring Kay Francis, Dolores del Río, Ricardo Cortez, and Dick Powell.
He played opposite Joan Crawford in Montana Moon (1930), played Sam Spade in the original, pre-code version of The Maltese Falcon (1931), co-starred with Charles Farrell and Bette Davis in The Big Shakedown (1934), and with Al Jolson and Dolores del Río in Wonder Bar (1934).