A report on Alaska and Vermont

A modern Alutiiq dancer in traditional festival garb
The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
The Russian settlement of St. Paul's Harbor (present-day Kodiak town), Kodiak Island, 1814
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
Miners and prospectors climb the Chilkoot Trail during the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
U.S. troops navigate snow and ice during the Battle of Attu in May 1943
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Alaska's size compared with the 48 contiguous states (Albers equal-area conic projection)
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Denali is the highest peak in North America.
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
Although entirely east of the International Date Line (the triangular kink in the line was agreed upon the US acquisition of Alaska), the Aleutian Islands cross the 180th meridian, such that they contain both the westernmost (Amatignak) and the easternmost (Semisopochnoi) points in the United States
Population density of Vermont
Anchorage, Alaska's largest city
Mount Mansfield
Fairbanks, Alaska's second-largest city and by a significant margin the largest city in Alaska's interior
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Juneau, Alaska's third-largest city and its capital
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
Bethel, the largest city in the Unorganized Borough and in rural Alaska
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Homer, showing (from bottom to top) the edge of downtown, its airport and the Spit
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
Utqiaġvik (Browerville neighborhood near Eben Hopson Middle School shown), known colloquially for many years by the nickname "Top of the World", is the northernmost city in the United States.
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
Cordova, built in the early 20th century to support the Kennecott Mines and the Copper River and Northwestern Railway, has persevered as a fishing community since their closure.
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Main Street in Talkeetna
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
Alaska has more acreage of public land owned by the federal government than any other state.
Lake Champlain
Köppen climate types of Alaska
Autumn in Vermont
Map of the largest racial/ethnic group by borough. Red indicates Native American, blue indicates non-Hispanic white, and green indicates Asian. Darker shades indicate a higher proportion of the population.
Stowe Resort Village
St. Michael's Russian Orthodox Cathedral in downtown Sitka
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
Gold Rush-era Baptist church in Eagle
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Aerial view of infrastructure at the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
The Trans-Alaska Pipeline transports oil, Alaska's most financially important export, from the North Slope to Valdez. The heat pipes in the column mounts are pertinent, since they disperse heat upwards and prevent melting of permafrost.
Amtrak station in White River Junction
Alaska proven oil reserves peaked in 1973 and have declined more than 60% since then
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
Alaskan oil production peaked in 1988 and has declined more than 75% since then
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Halibut, both as a sport fish and commercially, is important to the state's economy.
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
A dog team in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, arguably the most popular winter event in Alaska
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Mask Display at Iñupiat Heritage Center in Utqiaġvik
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010
Films featuring Alaskan wolves usually employ domesticated wolf-dog hybrids to stand in for wild wolves.
The Kachemak Bay Campus of the University of Alaska Anchorage, located in downtown Homer
The Sterling Highway, near its intersection with the Seward Highway
The Susitna River bridge on the Denali Highway is 1036 ft long.
Alaska Interstate Highways
Alaska welcome sign on the Klondike Highway
An Alaska Railroad locomotive over a bridge in Girdwood approaching Anchorage (2007)
The White Pass and Yukon Route traverses rugged terrain north of Skagway near the Canada–US border.
The (named after Tustumena Glacier) is one of the state's many ferries, providing service between the Kenai Peninsula, Kodiak Island and the Aleutian Chain.
A Bombardier Dash 8, operated by Era Alaska, on approach to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport
The center of state government in Juneau. The large buildings in the background are, from left to right: the Court Plaza Building (known colloquially as the "Spam Can"), the State Office Building (behind), the Alaska Office Building, the John H. Dimond State Courthouse, and the Alaska State Capitol. Many of the smaller buildings in the foreground are also occupied by state government agencies.
A line graph showing the presidential vote by party from 1960 to 2016 in Alaska
Mike Dunleavy, Governor
Kevin Meyer, Lieutenant governor
Lisa Murkowski, senior United States senator
Dan Sullivan, junior United States senator
Don Young, U.S. representative (at-large) (Deceased)
Bob Bartlett & Ernest Gruening, Alaska's inaugural U.S. Senators, hold the 49 star U.S. Flag after the admission of Alaska as the 49th state.
Ketchikan, one of the places affected by COVID-19 during the 2020 outbreak in Alaska

In 2010, Alaska ranked as the 47th state by population, ahead of North Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming (and Washington, D.C.).

- Alaska

It is one of four states in the U.S. to have done this, along with Hawaii, Maine, and Alaska.

- Vermont

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The GDP of each U.S. state and the District of Columbia in 2020 according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

List of U.S. states and territories by GDP

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List of U.S. states and territories by Gross Domestic Product .

List of U.S. states and territories by Gross Domestic Product .

The GDP of each U.S. state and the District of Columbia in 2020 according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
The GDP per capita of each U.S. state and the District of Columbia in 2020 according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau
Real GDP Growth Rate by U.S. state according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis in 2020

The three U.S. states with the lowest GDPs were Vermont ($36.1 Billion), Wyoming ($41.6 Billion), and Alaska ($55.0 Billion).

Native Americans in the United States

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Native Americans, also known as First Americans, Indigenous Americans, American Indians, and other terms, are the Indigenous peoples of the United States, including Hawaii and territories of the United States, and other times limited to the mainland.

Native Americans, also known as First Americans, Indigenous Americans, American Indians, and other terms, are the Indigenous peoples of the United States, including Hawaii and territories of the United States, and other times limited to the mainland.

Comanche Indians Chasing Buffalo with Lances and Bows, by George Catlin
The Cultural areas of pre-Columbian North America, according to Alfred Kroeber
This map shows the approximate location of the ice-free corridor and specific Paleoindian sites (Clovis theory).
A Folsom point for a spear
Artists conception of Ohio Hopewell culture Shriver Circle with the Mound City Group to the left
Cahokia, the largest Mississippian culture site
Map showing the approximate locations of the Native American nations circa 16th century
Discovery of the Mississippi by William Henry Powell (1823–1879) is a Romantic depiction of Spanish explorer de Soto's seeing the Mississippi River for the first time. It hangs in the United States Capitol rotunda.
1882 studio portrait of the (then) last surviving Six Nations warriors who fought with the British in the War of 1812
Early Native American tribal territories color-coded by linguistic group
The Treaty of Penn with the Indians by Benjamin West, painted in 1771
Yamacraw Creek Native Americans meet with the Trustee of the colony of Georgia in England, July 1734. The painting shows a Native American boy (in a blue coat) and woman (in a red dress) in European clothing.
Benjamin Hawkins, seen here on his plantation, teaches Creek Native Americans how to use European technology, painted in 1805
Native-controlled territories in the West, 1836
Tecumseh was the Shawnee leader of Tecumseh's War who attempted to organize an alliance of Native American tribes throughout North America.
The Rescue sculpture stood outside the U.S. Capitol between 1853 and 1958. A work commissioned by the U.S. government, its sculptor Horatio Greenough wrote that it was "to convey the idea of the triumph of the whites over the savage tribes".
Mass grave for the dead Lakota following the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre, which took place during the Indian Wars in the 19th century
Ely Parker (of the Seneca people) was a Union Civil War general who wrote the terms of surrender between the United States and the Confederate States of America.
Republican Charles Curtis, of Kaw, Osage, Potawatomi, French and British ancestry from Kansas, was 31st vice president of the United States, 1929–1933, serving with Republican Herbert Hoover.
General Douglas MacArthur meeting Navajo, Pima, Pawnee and other Native American troops
A Navajo man on horseback in Monument Valley, Arizona, United States
Byron Mallott, an Alaskan Native, was the lieutenant governor of Alaska.
Proportion of Indigenous Americans in each U.S. state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico as of the 2020 United States Census
This Census Bureau map depicts the locations of differing Native American groups, including Indian reservations, as of 2000. Note the concentration (blue) in modern-day Oklahoma in the South West, which was once designated as an Indian Territory before statehood in 1907.
Indian reservations in the continental United States
Native peoples are concerned about the effects of abandoned uranium mines on or near their lands.
National Indian Youth Council demonstrations, Bureau of Indian Affairs Office
A discriminatory sign posted above a bar. Birney, Montana, 1941
Chief Plenty Coups and seven Crow prisoners under guard at Crow agency, Montana, 1887
Protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, November 2014
Secotan Indians' dance in North Carolina. Watercolor by John White, 1585
Sandia Casino, owned by the Sandia Pueblo of New Mexico
Three Native American women in Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Wasco County, Oregon (1902)
Geronimo, Chiricahua Apache leader. Photograph by Frank A. Rinehart (1898).
Pre-contact: distribution of North American language families, including northern Mexico
Oklahoma Cherokee language immersion school student writing in the Cherokee syllabary
The Cherokee language taught to preschoolers as a first language, at New Kituwah Academy
Maize grown by Native Americans
Ojibwe baby waits on a cradleboard while parents tend wild rice crops (Minnesota, 1940).
Frybread, made into an Indian taco.
Makah Native Americans and a whale, The King of the Seas in the Hands of the Makahs, 1910 photograph by Asahel Curtis
Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, the patron of ecologists, exiles, and orphans, was canonized by the Catholic Church.
Baptism of Pocahontas was painted in 1840 by John Gadsby Chapman, who depicts Pocahontas, wearing white, being baptized Rebecca by Anglican minister Alexander Whiteaker (left) in Jamestown, Virginia. This event is believed to have taken place either in 1613 or 1614.
Susan La Flesche Picotte was the first Native American woman to become a physician in the United States.
Jim Thorpe—gold medalist at the 1912 Olympics, in the pentathlon and decathlon events
Ball players from the Choctaw and Lakota tribe in a 19th-century lithograph by George Catlin
Billy Mills crosses the finish line at the end of the 10,000-meter race at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.
Fancy Dancer at the Seafair Indian Days Pow-Wow, Daybreak Star Cultural Center, Seattle, Washington
Jake Fragua, Jemez Pueblo from New Mexico
Lillian Gross, described as a "Mixed Blood" by the Smithsonian source, was of Cherokee and European-American heritage. She identified with the Cherokee culture in which she was raised.
The 1725 return of an Osage bride from a trip to Paris, France. The Osage woman was married to a French soldier.
Five Indians and a Captive, painted by Carl Wimar, 1855
Charles Eastman was one of the first Native Americans to become certified as a medical doctor, after he graduated from Boston University.
Buffalo Soldiers, 1890. The nickname was given to the "Black Cavalry" by the Native American tribes they fought.
Ben Nighthorse Campbell, one of only four Native Americans elected to the U.S. Senate
Sharice Davids became one of the first two Native American women elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.
Deb Haaland became one of the first two Native American women elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.
Yvette Herrell became the first Cherokee woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.
Ada E. Brown, a citizen of the Choctaw Nation with mixed-African-American heritage, nominated by President Donald Trump in 2019 to be a federal judge in Texas
Members of the Creek (Muscogee) Nation in Oklahoma around 1877; they include men with some European and African ancestry.

The prevailing theory proposes that people migrated from Eurasia across Beringia, a land bridge that connected Siberia to present-day Alaska during the Last Glacial Period, and then spread southward throughout the Americas over subsequent generations.

Billy Kidd, part Abenaki from Vermont, became the first American male to medal in alpine skiing in the Olympics, taking silver at age 20 in the slalom in the 1964 Winter Olympics at Innsbruck, Austria.

Wyoming

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State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

The first Fort Laramie as it looked before 1840 (painting from memory by Alfred Jacob Miller)
A backcountry road in the Sierra Madre Range of southeastern Wyoming, near Bridger Peak
Köppen climate types of Wyoming, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
On Interstate 80, leaving Utah
Autumn in the Bighorn Mountains
Teton Range
Green River valley
An enlargeable map of the 23 counties of Wyoming
Since 2016, Wyoming license plates feature Squaretop Mountain in the background
Cheyenne, Wyoming
Casper, Wyoming
Rock Springs, Wyoming
Evanston, Wyoming
Rawlins, Wyoming
Wyoming is home to 12 ski resorts, including Grand Targhee and Jackson Hole.
Wind farm in Uinta County
North Antelope Rochelle Mine, the largest estimated coal mine reserve in the world, as of 2013
A natural gas rig west of the Wind River Range
Major highways of Wyoming
Wind River Canyon
Wyoming terrain map
National Park Service sites map
The largest population centers are Cheyenne (southeast) and Casper.
Wyoming State Capitol building, Cheyenne
State flower of Wyoming: Indian paintbrush
The Rocky Mountain Herbarium at the University of Wyoming
Yellowstone National Park
Devils Tower National Monument
Thunder Basin National Grassland
Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge

Wyoming has the second-lowest population density in the country (behind Alaska) and is the sparsest-populated of the 48 contiguous states.

It is one of only two states (Vermont) with a population smaller than that of the nation's capital.

Republican Party (United States)

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One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States.

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States.

Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–1865) and the first Republican to hold the office
Charles R. Jennison, an anti-slavery militia leader associated with the Jayhawkers from Kansas and an early Republican politician in the region
Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States (1869–1877)
James G. Blaine, 28th & 31st Secretary of State (1881; 1889–1892)
William McKinley, 25th president of the United States (1897–1901)
Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president of the United States (1901–1909)
Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929–1933)
Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States (1981–1989)
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States (2017–2021)
Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States (1923–1929)
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th governor of California (2003–2011)
John McCain, United States senator from Arizona (1987–2018)
Donald Rumsfeld, 21st United States Secretary of Defense (2001–2006)
Colin Powell, 65th United States Secretary of State (2001–2005)
Newt Gingrich, 50th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1995–1999)
Annual population growth in the U.S. by county - 2010s
This map shows the vote in the 2020 presidential election by county.
Political Spectrum Libertarian Left    Centrist   Right  Authoritarian
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

Democrats gained control of the Senate on June 6, 2001, when Republican Senator Jim Jeffords of Vermont switched his party affiliation to Democrat.

In 2008, Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona and Governor Sarah Palin of Alaska were defeated by Democratic Senators Barack Obama and Joe Biden of Illinois and Delaware, respectively.