Alba

AlbanyAlbynScotlandScottish
Alba is the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland.wikipedia
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Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
Alba is the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland.
By the 11th century at the latest, Scotia was being used to refer to (Gaelic-speaking) Scotland north of the River Forth, alongside Albania or Albany, both derived from the Gaelic Alba.

Albion

AlbaAlbinaAlbinus
(The third surviving Brythonic language, Breton, instead uses Bro-Skos, meaning 'country of the Scots'.) In the past these terms were names for Great Britain as a whole, related to the Brythonic name Albion.
The name for Scotland in most of the Celtic languages is related to Albion: Alba in Scottish Gaelic, Albain (genitive Alban) in Irish, Nalbin in Manx and Alban in Welsh and Cornish.

Duke of Albany

AlbanyDuke of Albany (1456)Duchess of Albany
It was this word which passed into Middle English as Albany, although very rarely was this used for the Kingdom of Scotland, but rather for the notional Duchy of Albany.
"Albany" was a broad territorial term representing the parts of Scotland north of the River Forth, roughly the former Kingdom of the Picts.

Albany, New York

AlbanyAlbany, NYCity
It is from the latter that Albany, the capital of the US state of New York, and Albany, Western Australia take their names.
The name is ultimately derived from Alba, the Gaelic name for Scotland.

Celtic League

Celtic League (political organisation)An Conradh CeilteachThe Celtic League
In the mid-1990s, the Celtic League started a campaign to have the word "Alba" on the Scottish football and rugby tops.
There are six main, national branches of the Celtic League in the six Celtic countries, generally known by the Celtic language names of their countries: Ireland is known as Éire, Scotland as Alba, Wales as Cymru, Brittany as Breizh, Cornwall as Kernow and the Isle of Man as Mannin or Mann.

Albanactus

AlbanusAlbanectuslegendary founder of Scotland
Albanactus, according to Geoffrey of Monmouth, was the founding king of Albania or Albany.

Albany

Albany (disambiguation)
It was this word which passed into Middle English as Albany, although very rarely was this used for the Kingdom of Scotland, but rather for the notional Duchy of Albany.

Scotia

ScotlandCeltic ScotiiNorth of the Firth
The only exceptions are the Celtic languages where the names are based on the Alba root, e.g. Manx Nalbin, Welsh ''Yr Alban", Irish "Albain."

Caledonia

CaledonCaledonianLatin For Scotland
Another, post-conquest, Roman name for the island of Great Britain was Albion, which is cognate with the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland: Alba.

Scottish Gaelic

GaelicScots GaelicGaelic language
Alba is the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland.

Cognate

cognatescognationequivalent
It is cognate with the Irish term Alba (gen.

Manx language

ManxManx Gaeliclanguage
Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages.

Goidelic languages

GaelicGoidelicGaelic languages
Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages.

Insular Celtic languages

Insular CelticInsular Celtic languageCeltic
Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages.

Cornish language

CornishOld CornishMiddle Cornish
Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages.

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages.

Brittonic languages

BrythonicBrittonicBrythonic languages
Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages.

Breton language

BretonOld BretonMiddle Breton
(The third surviving Brythonic language, Breton, instead uses Bro-Skos, meaning 'country of the Scots'.) In the past these terms were names for Great Britain as a whole, related to the Brythonic name Albion.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
(The third surviving Brythonic language, Breton, instead uses Bro-Skos, meaning 'country of the Scots'.) In the past these terms were names for Great Britain as a whole, related to the Brythonic name Albion.

Ptolemy

Claudius PtolemyClaudius PtolemaeusPtolemaic
The term first appears in classical texts as Ἀλβίων ' or Ἀλουΐων ' (in Ptolemy's writings in Greek), and later as Albion in Latin documents.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
The term first appears in classical texts as Ἀλβίων ' or Ἀλουΐων ' (in Ptolemy's writings in Greek), and later as Albion in Latin documents.

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-EuropeanPIEIndo-European
Historically, the term refers to Britain as a whole and is ultimately based on the Indo-European root for "white".

Dative case

dativedat.DAT
It later came to be used by Gaelic speakers in the form of Alba (dative Albainn, genitive Albann, now obsolete) as the name given to the former kingdom of the Picts which when first used in this sense (around the time of king Causantín mac Áeda (Constantine II, 943–952)) had expanded.

Genitive case

genitivegen.GEN
It later came to be used by Gaelic speakers in the form of Alba (dative Albainn, genitive Albann, now obsolete) as the name given to the former kingdom of the Picts which when first used in this sense (around the time of king Causantín mac Áeda (Constantine II, 943–952)) had expanded.

Picts

PictishPictPictland
It later came to be used by Gaelic speakers in the form of Alba (dative Albainn, genitive Albann, now obsolete) as the name given to the former kingdom of the Picts which when first used in this sense (around the time of king Causantín mac Áeda (Constantine II, 943–952)) had expanded.