Albanians

AlbanianAlbanian peopleethnic Albanianethnic AlbaniansAlbanian rebelsAlbanian ethnicityethnic-AlbanianpeopleAlbaniaAlbanian descent
The Albanians (Shqiptarët, ) are an ethnic group native to the Balkan Peninsula and are identified by a common Albanian ancestry, culture, history and language.wikipedia
3,521 Related Articles

Albanian language

AlbanianAlbAlbanian-speaking
The Albanians (Shqiptarët, ) are an ethnic group native to the Balkan Peninsula and are identified by a common Albanian ancestry, culture, history and language. The ethnogenesis of the Albanians and their language is a matter of controversy among historians and ethnologists.
Albanian (shqip or gjuha shqipe ) is an Indo-European language spoken by the Albanians in the Balkans and the Albanian diaspora in the Americas, Europe and Oceania.

Albania

Republic of AlbaniaAlbanianALB
They primarily live in Albania, Kosovo, North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia as well as in Croatia, Greece and Italy.
The Albanians established the autonomous Principality of Arbër in the 12th century.

Ghegs

GhegGegëniaGegs
The Shkumbin more southerly splits the Albanians into the Ghegs and Tosks nevertheless both groups identify with a shared ethnic culture, history and traditions. It was not easy, especially in the beginning, because they did not have their own church, school, etc., and is the only way to maintain their identity and language was verbally." The Great Schism of 1054 formalised the break of communion between the Eastern Orthodox and Western Catholic Church and was instantly reflected in Albania through the emergence of a Catholic north and Orthodox south. Inhabiting the west of Lake Ochrida and the upper valley of River Shkumbin, the Albanians established the Principality of Arbanon in 1190 with the capital in Krujë. In the 13th century, the Ghegs converted to Roman Catholicism in larger numbers from Eastern Orthodoxy as a means to resist the Slavic Serbs.
The Ghegs (also spelled Gegs; Gegët) are one of two major ethnic subgroups of Albanians (the other being the Tosks) differentiated by their cultural, linguistic, social and religious characteristics.

Albanian diaspora

DiasporaAlbanian communities1991 Albanian Exodus to Italy
The history of the Albanian diaspora is centuries old and has its roots in migration from the Middle Ages initially established in Southern Europe and subsequently on across other parts of Europe and the New World. The Ottomans had cut the Albanians off from significant European intellectual movements, amongst them the Renaissance and Enlightenment, and these ideas together with the ideals of Nationalism traditionally began to penetrate the Albanians through the Albanian diaspora conclusively leading to the Albanian Renaissance which was also incorporated with the influences of Romanticism.
The Albanian diaspora (Mërgata Shqiptare or Diaspora Shqiptare) are the ethnic Albanians and their descendants living outside of Albania, Kosovo, southeastern Montenegro, western North Macedonia, southeastern Serbia and northwestern Greece.

Tosks

ToskTosk AlbanianToskëria
The Shkumbin more southerly splits the Albanians into the Ghegs and Tosks nevertheless both groups identify with a shared ethnic culture, history and traditions.
The Tosks (Toskët) are one of two major ethnic subgroups of Albanians (the other being the Ghegs) differentiated by their cultural, linguistic, social and religious characteristics.

Arbëreshë people

ArbëreshëArbëreshArbereshe
Another population who emerged as the Arbëreshë settled Sicily and Southern Italy. Dialects spoken in Croatia (Arbanasi and Istrian), Kosovo, Montenegro and Northwestern North Macedonia are Gheg dialects, while those dialects spoken in Greece (Arvanites and Çam), Southwestern North Macedonia and Italy (Arbëreshë) are Tosk dialects.
The Arbëreshë (Arbëreshët e Italisë or Shqiptarët e Italisë), also known as Albanians of Italy or Italo-Albanians, are an Albanian ethnolinguistic group in Southern Italy, mostly concentrated in scattered villages in the regions of Apulia, Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Molise and Sicily.

Arbanasi people

ArbanasiArbanasArbanas of Croatia
Smaller populations such as the Arbanasi whose migration dates back to the 18th century are located in Southern Croatia and scattered across Southern Ukraine.. Dialects spoken in Croatia (Arbanasi and Istrian), Kosovo, Montenegro and Northwestern North Macedonia are Gheg dialects, while those dialects spoken in Greece (Arvanites and Çam), Southwestern North Macedonia and Italy (Arbëreshë) are Tosk dialects.
Arbanasi (Arbanasi language: Arbëneshë) is a community in the Zadar region, Croatia, of Albanian origin, who traditionally speak the Arbanasi dialect of Gheg Albanian.

Albanian National Awakening

rilindasAlbanian RenaissanceRilindja
The Ottomans had cut the Albanians off from significant European intellectual movements, amongst them the Renaissance and Enlightenment, and these ideas together with the ideals of Nationalism traditionally began to penetrate the Albanians through the Albanian diaspora conclusively leading to the Albanian Renaissance which was also incorporated with the influences of Romanticism.
The Albanian National Awakening (Rilindja or Rilindja Kombëtare), commonly known as the Albanian Renaissance or Albanian Revival, is a period throughout the 19th and 20th century of a cultural, political and social movement in the Albanian history where the Albanian people gathered strength to establish an independent cultural and political life as well as the country of Albania.

Islamization of Albania

socio-political and economic crisesconversions to Islamconverted
In the 17th and 18th centuries, a substantial number of Albanians converted to Islam offering them equal opportunities and advancement within the Ottoman Empire.
It was one of the most significant developments in Albanian history as Albanians in Albania went from being a largely Christian (Catholic and Orthodox) population to one that is mainly Muslim (Sunni, Bektashi and some other sects), while retaining significant ethnic Albanian Christian minorities in certain regions.

2008 Kosovo declaration of independence

declaration of independencedeclared its independencedeclared independence
Though in neighbouring Yugoslavia, Albanians underwent periods of discrimination that concluded with the Breakup of Yugoslavia and eventually the Independence of Kosovo.
It was the second declaration of independence by Kosovo's Albanian-majority political institutions; the first was proclaimed on 7 September 1990.

Independent Albania

AlbaniaAlbanianIndependence of Albania
During the Balkan Wars, the Albanians were partitioned between Independent Albania, Greece, Montenegro and Serbia.
The requests by the delegation for recognition based on the ethnic rights of Albanians were rejected and the treaty signed on 30 May 1913 partitioned a major part of the claimed lands between Serbia, Greece and Montenegro, leaving as independent territory only a central region, which was put under the protection of the Great Powers.

Albanian folk beliefs

Albanian mythologyAlbanian folkloreAlbanian
At this point, they are already fully Christianized, although Albanian mythology and folklore are part of the Paleo-Balkan pagan mythology, in particular showing Greek influence.
Albanian folk beliefs (Besimet popullore shqiptare) comprise myths and legends of the Albanians.

Cham Albanians

Cham AlbanianChamChams
Dialects spoken in Croatia (Arbanasi and Istrian), Kosovo, Montenegro and Northwestern North Macedonia are Gheg dialects, while those dialects spoken in Greece (Arvanites and Çam), Southwestern North Macedonia and Italy (Arbëreshë) are Tosk dialects.
Cham Albanians, or Chams (Çamë; Τσάμηδες, Tsámidhes), are a sub-group of Albanians who originally resided in the western part of the region of Epirus in northwestern Greece, an area known among Albanians as Chameria.

Albanians of Croatia

AlbaniansAlbanianCroatia
Dialects spoken in Croatia (Arbanasi and Istrian), Kosovo, Montenegro and Northwestern North Macedonia are Gheg dialects, while those dialects spoken in Greece (Arvanites and Çam), Southwestern North Macedonia and Italy (Arbëreshë) are Tosk dialects.
The Albanians of Croatia (Shqiptarët në Kroaci; Albanci u Hrvatskoj) are people of full or partial Albanian ancestry and heritage in Croatia.

Albanians in Montenegro

AlbaniansAlbanianMontenegro
Dialects spoken in Croatia (Arbanasi and Istrian), Kosovo, Montenegro and Northwestern North Macedonia are Gheg dialects, while those dialects spoken in Greece (Arvanites and Çam), Southwestern North Macedonia and Italy (Arbëreshë) are Tosk dialects.
Albanians in Montenegro (Shqiptarët e Malit të Zi; Albanci u Crnoj Gori) are an ethnic group in Montenegro of Albanian descent, which constitute 4.91% of Montenegro's total population.

Origin of the Albanians

Albanian ethnogenesisAlbanian originsOrigin of Albanians
The ethnogenesis of the Albanians and their language is a matter of controversy among historians and ethnologists.
The Albanians first appear in the historical record in Byzantine sources of the 11th century.

Principality of Arbanon

ArbanonPrincipality of ArbërArbanon, Principality of
It was not easy, especially in the beginning, because they did not have their own church, school, etc., and is the only way to maintain their identity and language was verbally." The Great Schism of 1054 formalised the break of communion between the Eastern Orthodox and Western Catholic Church and was instantly reflected in Albania through the emergence of a Catholic north and Orthodox south. Inhabiting the west of Lake Ochrida and the upper valley of River Shkumbin, the Albanians established the Principality of Arbanon in 1190 with the capital in Krujë. In the 13th century, the Ghegs converted to Roman Catholicism in larger numbers from Eastern Orthodoxy as a means to resist the Slavic Serbs.
Arbanon (Arbër or Arbëria, or Arbania, Ἄρβανον, Árbanon; Arbanum), or Albanon (, Álbanon), was an autonomous principality, the first Albanian state during the Middle Ages, initially part of the Byzantine Empire and later of the Despotate of Epirus.

North Macedonia

MacedoniaRepublic of MacedoniaMacedonian
They primarily live in Albania, Kosovo, North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia as well as in Croatia, Greece and Italy.
It was seriously destabilised by the Kosovo War in 1999, when an estimated 360,000 ethnic Albanian refugees from Kosovo took refuge in the country.

Karl Thopia

Karl TopiaKarlo ThopiaKarl
The kingdom however held out until 1368, when the city was captured by Karl Thopia.
Karl Thopia (Karl Topia) was an Albanian feudal prince and warlord who ruled Albania from the middle of the 14th century until the first Ottoman conquest of Albania.

League of Lezhë

League of LezheLeague of LezhaAlbania
Some of these principalities were united in 1444 under the military alliance called League of Lezha. Under the leadership of Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg, a prosperous and longstanding revolution erupted with the formation of the Assembly of Lezhë up until the Siege of Shkodër, multiple times defeating the mightiest power of the time led by Sultans Murad II and Mehmed II.
The League of Lezhë (Besëlidhja e Lezhës) was a military alliance of Albanian feudal lords forged in Lezhë on 2 March 1444, with Skanderbeg as leader of the regional Albanian and Serbian chieftains united against the Ottoman Empire.

Siege of Shkodra

Siege of ShkodërbesiegedSiege of Scutari
Under the leadership of Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg, a prosperous and longstanding revolution erupted with the formation of the Assembly of Lezhë up until the Siege of Shkodër, multiple times defeating the mightiest power of the time led by Sultans Murad II and Mehmed II.
The Siege of Shkodra of 1478–79 was a confrontation between the Ottoman Empire and the Albanians and Venetians at Shkodra (Scutari in Italian) and its Rozafa Castle during the First Ottoman-Venetian War (1463–79).

Albanians in North Macedonia

AlbanianAlbaniansMacedonian Albanian
Dialects spoken in Croatia (Arbanasi and Istrian), Kosovo, Montenegro and Northwestern North Macedonia are Gheg dialects, while those dialects spoken in Greece (Arvanites and Çam), Southwestern North Macedonia and Italy (Arbëreshë) are Tosk dialects.
The ethnic affiliation of these newborns was: 11,260 (51.76%) Macedonian; 7,404 (34.03%) Albanians; 940 (4.32%) Turkish; 1,276 (5.87%) Roma; 40 (0.18%) Vlach; 129 (0.59%) Serbian; 213 (0.98%) Bosniaks; 492 (2,26%) other ethnic affiliation and unknown.

Thopia family

ThopiaThopiasHouse of Thopia
Skanderbeg managed to gather several of the Albanian principals, amongst them the Arianitis, Dukagjinis, Zaharias and Thopias, and establish a centralised authority over most of the non-conquered territories instantly becoming the Lord of Albania.
Thopia family was one of the most powerful Albanian feudal families in the Late Middle Ages.

Zaharia family

ZahariaBolja ZahariaNikollë Zaharia
Skanderbeg managed to gather several of the Albanian principals, amongst them the Arianitis, Dukagjinis, Zaharias and Thopias, and establish a centralised authority over most of the non-conquered territories instantly becoming the Lord of Albania.
The Zaharia family was an Albanian noble family that appears for the first time mentioned in the 14th century.

Skanderbeg

George Kastrioti SkanderbegScanderbegSkenderbeg
Under the leadership of Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg, a prosperous and longstanding revolution erupted with the formation of the Assembly of Lezhë up until the Siege of Shkodër, multiple times defeating the mightiest power of the time led by Sultans Murad II and Mehmed II. Skanderbeg managed to gather several of the Albanian principals, amongst them the Arianitis, Dukagjinis, Zaharias and Thopias, and establish a centralised authority over most of the non-conquered territories instantly becoming the Lord of Albania. Their consequent resistance to Ottoman expansion into Europe led by Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg won them acclaim all over Europe.
Skanderbeg's rebellion was not a general uprising of Albanians, because he did not gain support in the Venetian-controlled north or in the Ottoman-controlled south.