Albert, Prince Consort

Prince AlbertPrince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and GothaPrince ConsortAlbertPrince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-GothaAlbert of Saxe-Coburg and GothaThe Prince ConsortAlbert, the Prince ConsortAlbert of Saxe-Coburg-GothaAlbert of Saxe-Coburg
Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel; 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.wikipedia
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Queen Victoria

VictoriaVictoria of the United KingdomDiamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria
Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel; 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
Victoria married her cousin Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha in 1840.

Coburg

Coburg, GermanyBertelsdorfCallenberg
Albert was born at Schloss Rosenau, near Coburg, Germany, the second son of Ernest III, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and his first wife, Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.
Through successful dynastic policies, the ruling princely family married into several of the royal families of Europe, most notably in the person of Prince Albert, who married Queen Victoria in 1840.

Schloss Rosenau, Coburg

Schloss RosenauRosenauRosenau Castle
Albert was born at Schloss Rosenau, near Coburg, Germany, the second son of Ernest III, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and his first wife, Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.
Schloss Rosenau was the birthplace and boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who, in 1840, became the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Countess Augusta Reuss of Ebersdorf

Augusta Reuss-EbersdorfAugustaAugusta Reuss of Ebersdorf
His godparents were his paternal grandmother, the Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld; his maternal grandfather, the Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg; the Emperor of Austria; the Duke of Teschen; and Emanuel, Count of Mensdorff-Pouilly.
She was the maternal grandmother of Queen Victoria and the paternal grandmother of Albert, Prince Consort.

House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Saxe-Coburg and GothaHouse of Saxe-Coburg-GothaSaxe-Coburg-Gotha
On her death in 1901, their eldest son succeeded as Edward VII, the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, named after the ducal house to which Albert belonged.
Agnatic branches currently reign in Belgium—the descendants of Leopold I—and in the United Kingdom—the descendants of Albert, Prince Consort.

Augustus, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg

AugustusEmil Leopold August, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-AltenburgAugust
His godparents were his paternal grandmother, the Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld; his maternal grandfather, the Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg; the Emperor of Austria; the Duke of Teschen; and Emanuel, Count of Mensdorff-Pouilly.
He was the maternal grandfather of Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria.

Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (1800–1831)

Louise of Saxe-Gotha-AltenburgPrincess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-AltenburgPrincess Louise
Albert was born at Schloss Rosenau, near Coburg, Germany, the second son of Ernest III, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and his first wife, Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.
Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (Louise Dorothea Pauline Charlotte Fredericka Auguste; 21 December 1800 – 30 August 1831) was the wife of Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and the mother of Duke Ernst II and Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria.

University of Bonn

BonnBonn UniversityRheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Like many other German princes, Albert attended the University of Bonn, where he studied law, political economy, philosophy and the history of art.
As of August 2018, among its notable alumni, faculty and researchers are 10 Nobel Laureates, 4 Fields Medalists, twelve Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize winners as well as August Kekulé, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Heinrich Heine, Prince Albert, Pope Benedict XVI, Frederick III, Max Ernst, Konrad Adenauer, and Joseph Schumpeter.

Ernest II, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and GothaErnest IIErnst II
Albert and his elder brother, Ernest, spent their youth in a close companionship marred by their parents' turbulent marriage and eventual separation and divorce.
Ernest and his only full sibling, his younger brother Prince Albert (consort to Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom), were raised as though twins.

Emmanuel von Mensdorff-Pouilly

Emanuel, Count of Mensdorff-PouillyEmmanel, Count von Mensdorff-PouillyEmmanuel Mensdorff
His godparents were his paternal grandmother, the Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld; his maternal grandfather, the Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg; the Emperor of Austria; the Duke of Teschen; and Emanuel, Count of Mensdorff-Pouilly.
He was the uncle of Queen Victoria and the Godfather of her husband Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Duchess Marie of Württemberg

Marie of WürttembergPrincess Marie of Württemberg
The following year, their father married his niece, his sons' cousin Princess Marie of Württemberg; their marriage was not close, however, and Marie had little—if any—impact on her stepchildren's lives.
As such, she was the stepmother of Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria.

Alexander von Hanstein, Count of Pölzig and Beiersdorf

Alexander von HansteinAlexander von Hanstein, Count of Polzig and Beiersdorf
After their mother was exiled from court in 1824, she married her lover, Alexander von Hanstein, Count of Polzig and Beiersdorf.
He was the stepfather of Prince Albert and grandfather of Hans Poelzig.

Albert Casimir, Duke of Teschen

Prince Albert of Saxony, Duke of TeschenAlbert of Saxe-TeschenAlbert Casimir
His godparents were his paternal grandmother, the Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld; his maternal grandfather, the Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg; the Emperor of Austria; the Duke of Teschen; and Emanuel, Count of Mensdorff-Pouilly.
Prince Albert of Saxony, Duke of Teschen, was also one of the godparents to his namesake, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Prince consort

King consortconsortThe Prince Consort
Initially he felt constrained by his role of prince consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities.
Prince Albert is the only spouse of a British queen to have held the title "Prince Consort".

Louise Lehzen

Baroness LehzenBaroness Louise Lehzen
The Queen's household was run by her former governess, Baroness Lehzen.
The Queen's marriage to Prince Albert in 1840 led to significant changes in the royal household.

Osborne House

OsborneOsbourne HouseDurbar Lawn at Osborne House
By 1844, Albert had managed to modernise the royal finances and, through various economies, had sufficient capital to purchase Osborne House on the Isle of Wight as a private residence for their growing family.
The house was built between 1845 and 1851 for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert as a summer home and rural retreat.

1847 University of Cambridge Chancellor election

1847became the first in 163 years to be contested by another candidateclose contest
In 1847, Albert was elected Chancellor of the University of Cambridge after a close contest with the Earl of Powis.
Many senior figures in the university hoped that Prince Albert, the Prince Consort could be persuaded to stand and be elected unopposed, but a group from St John's College approached the Earl of Powis, a St John's man.

Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld

Duchy of Saxe-Coburg-SaalfeldDuke of Saxe-Coburg-SaalfeldDuchy of Saxe-Coburg
Born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs, at the age of 20 Albert married his cousin, Victoria; they had nine children.
He was the father of Prince Albert, who married his cousin, Queen Victoria, in 1840 and became The Prince Consort of Great Britain and Ireland.

Leopold I of Belgium

Leopold IKing Leopold ILéopold I, King of the Belgians
By 1836, this idea had also arisen in the mind of their ambitious uncle Leopold, who had been King of the Belgians since 1831.
Had Charlotte survived, she would have become queen of the United Kingdom on the death of her father and Leopold presumably would have assumed the role of prince consort, later taken by his nephew Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll

Princess LouisePrincess Louise Caroline AlbertaPrincess Louise, Marchioness of Lorne
He and Victoria, who gave birth to their daughter Louise during that year, spent some time away from London in the relative safety of Osborne.
Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, (Louisa Caroline Alberta; 18 March 1848 – 3 December 1939) was the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

Balmoral Castle

BalmoralBalmoral EstateBalmoralism
That summer, Victoria and Albert spent a rainy holiday in the west of Scotland at Loch Laggan, but heard from their doctor, Sir James Clark, that his son had enjoyed dry, sunny days farther east at Balmoral Castle.
Balmoral has been one of the residences of the British royal family since 1852, when the estate and its original castle were purchased privately by Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.

Palace of Westminster

Houses of ParliamentWestminster HallWestminster
After the 1841 general election, Melbourne was replaced as Prime Minister by Sir Robert Peel, who appointed Albert as chairman of the Royal Commission in charge of redecorating the new Palace of Westminster.
In a process overseen by a Royal Fine Art Commission under the presidency of Prince Albert, a Select Committee which included Sir Robert Peel started to take witness accounts from experts in 1841.

Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Duke of Saxe-Coburg and GothaDuchy of Saxe-Coburg and GothaDuchy of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
His death led to a realignment of Saxon duchies the following year and Albert's father became the first reigning duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.
Because he had died childless, the throne of the two duchies would have passed to his late brother Prince Albert's male descendants.

Imperial College London

Imperial CollegeImperial College of Science and TechnologyImperial College, London
A surplus of £180,000 was used to purchase land in South Kensington on which to establish educational and cultural institutions—including the Natural History Museum, Science Museum, Imperial College London and what would later be named the Royal Albert Hall and the Victoria and Albert Museum.
In 1851, Prince Albert built his vision of an area for culture, including the Victoria and Albert Museum, Natural History Museum, Royal Colleges, Royal Albert Hall, and the Imperial Institute.

Victoria and Albert Museum

Victoria & Albert MuseumV&ASouth Kensington Museum
A surplus of £180,000 was used to purchase land in South Kensington on which to establish educational and cultural institutions—including the Natural History Museum, Science Museum, Imperial College London and what would later be named the Royal Albert Hall and the Victoria and Albert Museum.
It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.