Albertus Magnus

Albert the GreatSaint Albert the GreatSt. Albert the GreatAlbertAlbert MagnusSt. Albertus MagnusSaint Albertus MagnusAlbert of CologneAlbertismAlbertist
Albertus Magnus (before 1200 – November 15, 1280), also known as Saint Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, was a German Catholic Dominican friar and bishop.wikipedia
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List of people known as "the Great"

the GreatList of people known as The GreatGreat
Later canonised as a Catholic saint, he was known during his lifetime as Doctor universalis and Doctor expertus and, late in his life, the sobriquet Magnus was appended to his name.
Once the term gained currency, it was broadened to include persons in other fields, such as the philosopher Albert the Great.

Dominican Order

DominicanO.P.Dominicans
Albertus Magnus (before 1200 – November 15, 1280), also known as Saint Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, was a German Catholic Dominican friar and bishop.
Its schools spread throughout the entire Church; its doctors wrote monumental works in all branches of knowledge, including the extremely important Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas.

Doctor of the Church

Doctors of the Churchdoctordoctor of the Catholic Church
The Catholic Church distinguishes him as one of the 36 Doctors of the Church.
Systematic theologians include the Scholastic philosophers Saint Anselm of Canterbury, Saint Albert the Great, and Saint Thomas Aquinas.

Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas

Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, ''AngelicumAngelicumPontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum)
This innovation initiated the tradition of Dominican scholastic philosophy put into practice, for example, in 1265 at the Order's studium provinciale at the convent of Santa Sabina in Rome, out of which would develop the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, the "Angelicum".
At the general chapter of Valenciennes in 1259 Thomas Aquinas together with masters Bonushomo Britto, Florentius, Albert, and Peter took part in establishing a program of studies for novices and lectors including two years of philosophy, two years of fundamental theology, church history and canon law, and four years of theology.

Valenciennes

Valenciennes, FranceValenciennoisBattle of Valenciennes
In 1259 Albert took part in the General Chapter of the Dominicans at Valenciennes together with Thomas Aquinas, masters Bonushomo Britto, Florentius, and Peter (later Pope Innocent V) establishing a ratio studiorum or program of studies for the Dominicans that featured the study of philosophy as an innovation for those not sufficiently trained to study theology.
In 1259 Valenciennes was the site of a General Chapter of the Dominican Order at which Thomas Aquinas together with masters Bonushomo Britto, Florentius, Albert, and Peter took part in establishing a ratio studiorum or program of studies for the Dominican Order that featured the study of philosophy as an innovation for those not sufficiently trained to study theology.

Germans

Germanethnic Germanethnic Germans
Albertus Magnus (before 1200 – November 15, 1280), also known as Saint Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, was a German Catholic Dominican friar and bishop.
German philosophers have helped shape western philosophy from as early as the Middle Ages (Albertus Magnus).

Pope Pius XI

Pius XIAchille Rattithe Pope
He was canonized and proclaimed a Doctor of the Church on December 16, 1931, by Pope Pius XI and the patron saint of natural scientists in 1941.
He beatified and canonized Thérèse de Lisieux, for whom he held special reverence, and gave equivalent canonization to Albertus Magnus, naming him a Doctor of the Church due to the spiritual power of his writings.

Early Islamic philosophy

philosopherphilosophyearly Muslim philosophy
During his tenure he publicly defended the Dominicans against attacks by the secular and regular faculty of the University of Paris, commented on John the Evangelist, and answered what he perceived as errors of the Islamic philosopher Averroes.
Nevertheless, his psychology and theory of knowledge influenced William of Auvergne and Albertus Magnus, and his metaphysics influenced the thought of Thomas Aquinas.

Pope Innocent V

Innocent VPierre de TarentaisePeter
In 1259 Albert took part in the General Chapter of the Dominicans at Valenciennes together with Thomas Aquinas, masters Bonushomo Britto, Florentius, and Peter (later Pope Innocent V) establishing a ratio studiorum or program of studies for the Dominicans that featured the study of philosophy as an innovation for those not sufficiently trained to study theology.
Peter participated together with Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Bonushomo Britto, and Florentius.

Zoology

zoologistzoologicalzoologists
These displayed his prolific habits and encyclopedic knowledge of topics such as logic, theology, botany, geography, astronomy, astrology, mineralogy, alchemy, zoology, physiology, phrenology, justice, law, friendship, and love.
This ancient work was further developed in the Middle Ages by Muslim physicians and scholars such as Albertus Magnus.

Avicenna

Ibn SinaIbn SīnāAbu Ali ibn Sina
The study of Aristotle brought him to study and comment on the teachings of Muslim academics, notably Avicenna and Averroes, and this would bring him into the heart of academic debate.
Avicenna's psychology and theory of knowledge influenced William of Auvergne, Bishop of Paris and Albertus Magnus, while his metaphysics influenced the thought of Thomas Aquinas.

List of the prince-bishops and bishops of Regensburg

Bishop of RegensburgBishop of RatisbonPrince-Bishop of Regensburg
In 1260 Pope Alexander IV made him bishop of Regensburg, an office from which he resigned after three years.

Speculum Astronomiae

Speculum
The most comprehensive statement of his astrological beliefs is to be found in a work he authored around 1260, now known as the Speculum astronomiae.
Albertus Magnus produced the Speculum astronomiae [The Mirror of Astronomy] (de refutatione librorum astronomiae, incipit Occasione quorundam librorum apud quos non est radix sciencie) sometime after 1260 to defend astrology as a Christian form of knowledge (Zambelli, 1992; Hendrix, 2007).

Silver nitrate

AgNO 3 nitrate of silverAgNO3
He is credited with the discovery of the element arsenic and experimented with photosensitive chemicals, including silver nitrate.
Albertus Magnus, in the 13th century, documented the ability of nitric acid to separate gold and silver by dissolving the silver.

Natural law

laws of naturenatural lawslaw of nature
Albert devoted the last tractatus of De Bono to a theory of justice and natural law.
References to natural law are also found in the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, later expounded upon in the Middle Ages by Christian philosophers such as Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas.

Aristotelianism

AristotelianAristotelian philosophyAristotelians
The philosophical works, occupying the first six and the last of the 21 volumes, are generally divided according to the Aristotelian scheme of the sciences, and consist of interpretations and condensations of Aristotle's relative works, with supplementary discussions upon contemporary topics, and occasional divergences from the opinions of the master.
Scholars such as Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas interpreted and systematized Aristotle's works in accordance with Catholic theology.

Scholasticism

scholasticScholasticsscholastic philosophy
Albert's activity, however, was more philosophical than theological (see Scholasticism).
Some of the main figures of scholasticism include Anselm of Canterbury (the "father of scholasticism" ), Peter Abelard, Alexander of Hales, Albertus Magnus, Duns Scotus, William of Ockham, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas.

Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa

Cornelius AgrippaHenry Cornelius AgrippaAgrippa
Albert is also mentioned, along with Agrippa and Paracelsus, in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, in which his writings influence a young Victor Frankenstein.
The University of Cologne was one of the centers of Thomism, and the faculty of arts was split between the dominant Thomists and the Albertists.

Victor Frankenstein

Dr. FrankensteinHenry FrankensteinDr. Victor Frankenstein
Albert is also mentioned, along with Agrippa and Paracelsus, in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, in which his writings influence a young Victor Frankenstein.
As a boy, Frankenstein is interested in the works of alchemists such as Cornelius Agrippa, Paracelsus, and Albertus Magnus, and he longs to discover the fabled elixir of life.

Philosopher's stone

Philosopher’s Stonephilosophers' stoneThe Philosopher's Stone
These include Metals and Materials; the Secrets of Chemistry; the Origin of Metals; the Origins of Compounds, and a Concordance which is a collection of Observations on the philosopher's stone; and other alchemy-chemistry topics, collected under the name of Theatrum Chemicum.
According to legend, the 13th-century scientist and philosopher Albertus Magnus is said to have discovered the philosophers' stone.

Albertus Magnus High School

Albertus Magnus (Bardonia)
A number of schools have been named after Albert, including Albertus Magnus High School in Bardonia, New York; Albertus Magnus Lyceum in River Forest, Illinois; and Albertus Magnus College in New Haven, Connecticut.
Albertus Magnus High School, also known as AMHS, Albertus, and Magnus, is a Catholic, co-educational high school located in Bardonia, New York, named after the German philosopher and theologian of the same name.

Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas AquinasAquinasSaint Thomas Aquinas
During this time Thomas Aquinas began to study under Albertus.
In 1245 Thomas was sent to study at the Faculty of the Arts at the University of Paris, where he most likely met Dominican scholar Albertus Magnus, then the holder of the Chair of Theology at the College of St. James in Paris.

Arsenic

AsAs 2 Arsenate
He is credited with the discovery of the element arsenic and experimented with photosensitive chemicals, including silver nitrate.
Albertus Magnus (Albert the Great, 1193–1280) later isolated the element from a compound in 1250, by heating soap together with arsenic trisulfide.

Regensburg

RatisbonRegensburg, GermanyCastra Regina
Selected to fill the position of lecturer at Cologne, Germany, where the Dominicans had a house, he taught for several years there, as well as in Regensburg, Freiburg, Strasbourg, and Hildesheim.

Alchemy

alchemistalchemicalalchemists
These displayed his prolific habits and encyclopedic knowledge of topics such as logic, theology, botany, geography, astronomy, astrology, mineralogy, alchemy, zoology, physiology, phrenology, justice, law, friendship, and love.
In the 13th century, Albertus Magnus and Roger Bacon were the most notable of these, their work summarizing and explaining the newly imported alchemical knowledge in Aristotelian terms.