Alex Raymond

RaymondAlex] Raymond
Alexander Gillespie Raymond, Jr. (October 2, 1909 – September 6, 1956) was an American cartoonist who was best known for creating the Flash Gordon comic strip for King Features Syndicate in 1934.wikipedia
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Flash Gordon

comic strip of the same nameAnnihilantsFlash
Alexander Gillespie Raymond, Jr. (October 2, 1909 – September 6, 1956) was an American cartoonist who was best known for creating the Flash Gordon comic strip for King Features Syndicate in 1934.
Flash Gordon is the hero of a space opera adventure comic strip created by and originally drawn by Alex Raymond.

Flash Gordon (film)

Flash Gordon19801980 feature
The strip was subsequently adapted into many other media, from three Universal movie serials in 1936, 1938, and 1940, ) to a 1970s television series and a 1980 feature film.
Flash Gordon is a 1980 British-Dutch-American space opera film based on the King Features comic strip of the same name created by Alex Raymond.

Secret Agent X-9

Secret Agent CorriganAgent CorriganAgent X9
Raymond also worked on the jungle adventure saga Jungle Jim and spy adventure Secret Agent X-9 concurrently with Flash, though his increasing workload caused him to leave Secret Agent X-9 to another artist by 1935.
Secret Agent X-9 was a comic strip created by writer Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon) and artist Alex Raymond (Flash Gordon).

Jungle Jim

Jungle Jim with Johnny WeissmullerThe Adventures of Jungle JimVoodoo Tiger
Raymond also worked on the jungle adventure saga Jungle Jim and spy adventure Secret Agent X-9 concurrently with Flash, though his increasing workload caused him to leave Secret Agent X-9 to another artist by 1935.
Illustrator Alex Raymond and pulp magazine author Don Moore created the original strip as a topper to run above Raymond's Flash Gordon.

Rip Kirby

Remington "Rip" Kirby
Upon his return to civilian life, Raymond created and illustrated the much-heralded Rip Kirby, a private detective comic strip.
Rip Kirby is a 1946-1999 American comic strip created by Alex Raymond and Ward Greene featuring the adventures of private detective Rip Kirby.

Al Williamson

Williamson
Numerous artists have cited Raymond as an inspiration for their work, including comic artists Jack Kirby, Bob Kane, Russ Manning, and Al Williamson.
In his youth, Williamson developed an interest in comic strips, particularly Alex Raymond's Flash Gordon.

Jack Kirby

KirbyJack "King" Kirby[Jack] Kirby
Numerous artists have cited Raymond as an inspiration for their work, including comic artists Jack Kirby, Bob Kane, Russ Manning, and Al Williamson.
Essentially self-taught, Kirby cited among his influences the comic strip artists Milton Caniff, Hal Foster, and Alex Raymond, as well as such editorial cartoonists as C.H. Sykes, "Ding" Darling, and Rollin Kirby.

Tim Tyler's Luck

In the early 1930s, this led Raymond to become an assistant illustrator on strips such as Tillie the Toiler and Tim Tyler's Luck. From late 1931 to 1933, Raymond assisted Lyman Young on Tim Tyler's Luck, eventually becoming the ghost artist in "1932 and 1933... [on] both the daily strip and the Sunday page", turning it "into one of the most eye-catching strips of the time".
The illustrators included Alex Raymond, Burne Hogarth, Clark Haas, Tony DiPreta, Nat Edson and Tom Massey.

Ward Greene

Raymond's "police daily strip," named after its central character – J. Remington "Rip" Kirby – debuted on March 4, 1946, conceived (and initially scripted) by King Features editor Ward Greene.
He is known for overseeing the works of Alex Raymond and other writers and artists at King Features Syndicate, as well as writing Raymond's Rip Kirby comic strip from 1946 until his death.

Grand Central School of Art

Grand Central School of Contemporary ArtsNew York's Grand Central School of Art
In the wake of the 1929 economic crisis, he enrolled in the Grand Central School of Art in New York City and began working as a solicitor for a mortgage broker.

National Cartoonists Society

National Cartoonist SocietyReuben AwardReuben Awards
Circulation of the strip rose steadily, and it was the artist who was apportioned most of the praise – including being awarded the fourth Reuben Award in 1949.
By March 1947, the NCS had 112 members, including Bud Fisher (Mutt and Jeff), Don Flowers (Glamor Girls), Bob Kane (Batman), Fred Lasswell (Barney Google and Snuffy Smith), George Lichty (Grin and Bear It), Zack Mosley (The Adventures of Smilin' Jack), Alex Raymond (Rip Kirby), Cliff Sterrett (Polly and Her Pals) and Chic Young (Blondie), plus editorial cartoonists Reg Manning and Fred O. Seibel and sports cartoonist Willard Mullin.

Lyman Young

Lyman
From late 1931 to 1933, Raymond assisted Lyman Young on Tim Tyler's Luck, eventually becoming the ghost artist in "1932 and 1933... [on] both the daily strip and the Sunday page", turning it "into one of the most eye-catching strips of the time".
The illustrators included Alex Raymond, Burne Hogarth, Clark Haas, Nat Edson and Tom Massey.

Blue Book (magazine)

Blue BookBlue Book MagazineThe Blue Book Magazine
Although his work was rarely seen outside of the newspaper "funny pages", as Raymond preferred to focus his energies on strip work, he also produced a number of "illustrations for Blue Book, Look, Collier's and Cosmopolitan".
Interior Illustrators for the magazine included Alex Raymond and Austin Briggs (better known for their comics work), John Clymer, John Richard Flanagan, Joseph Franke, L. R. Gustavson, and Henry Thiede.

List of Eisner Award winners

Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of FameWill Eisner Hall of FameWill Eisner Award Hall of Fame
He was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1996.

Hal Foster

Harold FosterFosterHarold R. Foster
Raymond swiftly became "among the most highly-regarded—and most imitated—in all of comics" for his work on the weekly strip, with Harvey declaring his work on the strip "a technical virtuosity matched on the comics pages only by Harold Foster in Prince Valiant."
R.C. Harvey argues that Foster and Flash Gordon artist Alex Raymond "created the visual standard by which all such comic strips would henceforth be measured."

José Luis García-López

García-LópezJose Luis Garcia-LopezJosé Luis Garcia-Lopez
Comics artists who have cited Raymond as a particularly significant influence on their work include Murphy Anderson, Jim Aparo, Frank Brunner, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Dick Dillin, José Luis García-López, Frank Giacoia, Bob Haney, Jack Katz, Everett Raymond Kinstler, Joe Kubert, Russ Manning, Mort Meskin, Sheldon Moldoff, Luis Garcia Mozos, Joe Orlando, Mac Raboy, John Romita Jr., Kurt Schaffenberger, Joe Sinnott, Dick Sprang and Alex Toth, among many others.
He was inspired by artists as Alex Raymond, Harold Foster, Milton Caniff, José Luis Salinas, and Alberto Breccia.

Iona Preparatory School

Iona PrepIona PreparatoryIona
After his father's death when Raymond was 12, he felt that there was not as viable a future in art, as he had hoped, so he attended Iona Prep on an athletic scholarship.

John Buscema

Stephanie Buscema
Comics artists who have cited Raymond as a particularly significant influence on their work include Murphy Anderson, Jim Aparo, Frank Brunner, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Dick Dillin, José Luis García-López, Frank Giacoia, Bob Haney, Jack Katz, Everett Raymond Kinstler, Joe Kubert, Russ Manning, Mort Meskin, Sheldon Moldoff, Luis Garcia Mozos, Joe Orlando, Mac Raboy, John Romita Jr., Kurt Schaffenberger, Joe Sinnott, Dick Sprang and Alex Toth, among many others.
In his teens, he developed an interest in both superhero comic books and such classic adventure comic strips as Hal Foster's Tarzan and Prince Valiant, Burne Hogarth's Tarzan, Alex Raymond's Flash Gordon, and Milton Caniff's Terry and the Pirates.

Milton Caniff

Milt CaniffCaniffMilton Caniff Collection
A. E. Mendez has also stated that "Raymond’s achievements are chopped into bite-sized pieces by the comic art cognoscenti. Lost in the worthwhile effort to distinguish comics as an art form, the romance, sweep and beauty of Raymond's draftsmanship, his incomparable line work, is dismissed. To many, it's just pretty pictures. Somehow or another, it's OK for people like Caniff and Eisner to borrow from film. That’s real storytelling. But for Raymond to study illustrators, well, that's just not comics." The artistic creators of Batman (Bob Kane) and Superman (Joe Shuster) credit him (alongside Milton Caniff, Billy DeBeck and Roy Crane) as having had a strong influence on their artistic development.
Along with Hal Foster and Alex Raymond, Caniff's style had a tremendous influence on the artists who drew American comic books and adventure strips during the mid-20th century.

Jack Katz (artist)

Jack KatzThe First Kingdom
Comics artists who have cited Raymond as a particularly significant influence on their work include Murphy Anderson, Jim Aparo, Frank Brunner, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Dick Dillin, José Luis García-López, Frank Giacoia, Bob Haney, Jack Katz, Everett Raymond Kinstler, Joe Kubert, Russ Manning, Mort Meskin, Sheldon Moldoff, Luis Garcia Mozos, Joe Orlando, Mac Raboy, John Romita Jr., Kurt Schaffenberger, Joe Sinnott, Dick Sprang and Alex Toth, among many others.
Influenced by such illustrative comic-strip artists as Hal Foster and Alex Raymond, Katz attended the School of Industrial Art in New York City.

Austin Briggs

Flash Gordon gained a daily strip in 1940, illustrated by Austin Briggs.
Briggs later became an assistant to the cartoonist Alex Raymond on Flash Gordon and succeeded him on Secret Agent Corrigan.

Chic Young

Concurrently, Raymond assisted Chic Young on Blondie.
Young worked with several assistants, including Alex Raymond and Ray McGill.

Everett Kinstler

Everett Raymond KinstlerEverett Raymond Kinstler, N.A.
Comics artists who have cited Raymond as a particularly significant influence on their work include Murphy Anderson, Jim Aparo, Frank Brunner, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Dick Dillin, José Luis García-López, Frank Giacoia, Bob Haney, Jack Katz, Everett Raymond Kinstler, Joe Kubert, Russ Manning, Mort Meskin, Sheldon Moldoff, Luis Garcia Mozos, Joe Orlando, Mac Raboy, John Romita Jr., Kurt Schaffenberger, Joe Sinnott, Dick Sprang and Alex Toth, among many others.
Kinstler's influences included Alex Raymond, James Montgomery Flagg, Howard Chandler Christy, Milton Caniff, and Hal Foster.

Alex Toth

[Alex] TothToth
Comics artists who have cited Raymond as a particularly significant influence on their work include Murphy Anderson, Jim Aparo, Frank Brunner, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Dick Dillin, José Luis García-López, Frank Giacoia, Bob Haney, Jack Katz, Everett Raymond Kinstler, Joe Kubert, Russ Manning, Mort Meskin, Sheldon Moldoff, Luis Garcia Mozos, Joe Orlando, Mac Raboy, John Romita Jr., Kurt Schaffenberger, Joe Sinnott, Dick Sprang and Alex Toth, among many others.
Although he initially aimed to do newspaper strips ("It was my dream to do what Caniff, Raymond, and Foster had done"), he found the industry "dying" and instead moved into comic books.

Superman

Kal-ElClark Kent / SupermanClark Kent
The artistic creators of Batman (Bob Kane) and Superman (Joe Shuster) credit him (alongside Milton Caniff, Billy DeBeck and Roy Crane) as having had a strong influence on their artistic development.
Shuster remarked on the artists which played an important part in the development of his own style: "Alex Raymond and Burne Hogarth were my idols – also Milt Caniff, Hal Foster, and Roy Crane."