Alexander Alekhine

AlekhineAlekhine, AlexanderAljechin
Alexander Alekhine (Алекса́ндр Алекса́ндрович Але́хин, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Alekhin; ; October 31 1892 – March 24, 1946) was a Russian and French chess player and the fourth World Chess Champion.wikipedia
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Paul Keres

Keres
His tournament record, however, remained uneven, and rising young stars like Paul Keres, Reuben Fine, and Mikhail Botvinnik threatened his title.
He won the 1938 AVRO tournament, which led to negotiations for a title match against champion Alexander Alekhine, but the match never took place due to World War II.

Reuben Fine

FineFine, ReubenFine, Rueben
His tournament record, however, remained uneven, and rising young stars like Paul Keres, Reuben Fine, and Mikhail Botvinnik threatened his title.
After the death of world champion Alexander Alekhine in 1946, Fine was one of six players invited to compete for the World Championship in 1948.

José Raúl Capablanca

CapablancaJosé CapablancaJ. R. Capablanca
In 1927, he became the fourth World Chess Champion by defeating José Raúl Capablanca. In April–May 1914, another major St. Petersburg 1914 chess tournament was held in the capital of the Russian Empire, in which Alekhine took third place behind Emanuel Lasker and José Raúl Capablanca.
Capablanca lost the title in 1927 to Alexander Alekhine, who had never beaten Capablanca before the match.

Alekhine's Defence

AlekhineAlekhine DefenceTwo Knights Variation
He is highly regarded as a chess writer and theoretician, having produced innovations in a wide range of chess openings and having given his name to Alekhine's Defence and several other opening variations.
The opening is named after Alexander Alekhine, who introduced it in the Budapest tournament in games against Endre Steiner and Fritz Sämisch.

Comparison of top chess players throughout history

greatest chess player of all timegreatest chess playersall-time high record
He is widely considered to be one of the greatest chess players of all time.
2690: Alexander Alekhine, Paul Morphy, Vasily Smyslov

Russian Chess Championship

All-Russian Masters' TournamentRussian Championship SuperfinalRussian Championship
In January 1914, Alekhine won his first major Russian tournament, when he tied for first place with Aron Nimzowitsch in the All-Russian Masters Tournament at St. Petersburg.
| 8 || 1913/1914 || Saint Petersburg || Alexander Alekhine & Aron Nimzowitsch

Chess endgame

endgameendgamesending
Alekhine is known for his fierce and imaginative attacking style, combined with great positional and endgame skill.
Alexander Alekhine said "We cannot define when the middle game ends and the end-game starts".

Alexei Alekhine

Alexei
Alekhine was introduced to chess by his mother; an older brother, Alexei; and an older sister, Varvara (Barbara).
Alexei (Alexey) Alekhine (1888–1939) was a Russian chess master and the brother of World Chess Champion Alexander Alekhine.

Aron Nimzowitsch

NimzowitschNimzowitsch, AronA. I. Nimzovitch
In January 1914, Alekhine won his first major Russian tournament, when he tied for first place with Aron Nimzowitsch in the All-Russian Masters Tournament at St. Petersburg.
Then, he tied for first with Alexander Alekhine at Saint Petersburg 1913/14 (the eighth All-Russian Masters' Tournament).

Max Euwe

EuweEuwe, Max
He was defeated by Max Euwe in 1935, but regained his crown in the 1937 rematch.
He lost a training match to Alexander Alekhine held in the Netherlands in December 1926 / January 1927, with 4½/10 (+3 -2 =5).

Mannheim 1914 chess tournament

Mannheim 1914Mannheim tournament1914
In July–August 1914, Alekhine was leading an international Mannheim tournament, the 19th DSB Congress (German Chess Federation Congress) in Mannheim, Germany, with nine wins, one draw and one loss, when World War I broke out.
Alexander Alekhine was leading the Meisterturnier, with nine wins, one draw and one loss, when World War I broke out.

World Chess Championship

World ChampionWorld Chess ChampionWorld Championship
Alexander Alekhine (Алекса́ндр Алекса́ндрович Але́хин, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Alekhin; ; October 31 1892 – March 24, 1946) was a Russian and French chess player and the fourth World Chess Champion.
The players who held the title up until World War II were Steinitz, Emanuel Lasker, José Raúl Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine, and Max Euwe, each of them defeating the previous incumbent in a match.

Mikhail Botvinnik

BotvinnikBotvinnik, MikhailM.M. Botvinnik
His tournament record, however, remained uneven, and rising young stars like Paul Keres, Reuben Fine, and Mikhail Botvinnik threatened his title.
Soon afterwards, Botvinnik was informed that Alexander Ilyin-Genevsky, one of the older Soviet masters and a member of the Soviet embassy in Prague, had arranged a match between Botvinnik and Salo Flohr, a Czech grandmaster who was then regarded as one of the most credible contenders for Alexander Alekhine's World Chess Championship title.

St. Petersburg 1914 chess tournament

1914 Saint Petersburg chess tournamentSt. Petersburg 19141914 '''St. Petersburg
In April–May 1914, another major St. Petersburg 1914 chess tournament was held in the capital of the Russian Empire, in which Alekhine took third place behind Emanuel Lasker and José Raúl Capablanca.
They intended to invite the present top twenty chess players, with world champion Emanuel Lasker, challenger José Raúl Capablanca, and the two winners of the All-Russian Masters' Tournament 1913/14 (Alexander Alekhine and Aron Nimzowitsch).

Fedir Bohatyrchuk

BogatyrchukBohatyrchuk
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
In September 1914, Bohatyrchuk and three others (Alexander Alekhine, Peter Petrovich Saburov, and N. Koppelman) were freed and allowed to return home.

Moscow City Chess Championship

Moscow championshipMoscow ChampionMoscow City Championship
In January 1920, he swept the Moscow City Chess Championship (11/11), but was not declared Moscow Champion because he was not a resident of the city.
| 1919–20 || Alexander Alekhine

Emanuel Lasker

LaskerLasker Em.Lasker, Emanuel
In April–May 1914, another major St. Petersburg 1914 chess tournament was held in the capital of the Russian Empire, in which Alekhine took third place behind Emanuel Lasker and José Raúl Capablanca.
He won first prizes at very strong tournaments in St Petersburg (1895–96, Quadrangular), Nuremberg (1896), London (1899), Paris (1900) and St Petersburg (1914), where he overcame a 1½-point deficit to finish ahead of the rising stars, Capablanca and Alexander Alekhine, who later became the next two World Champions.

Grandmaster (chess)

grandmastergrandmasterschess grandmaster
By some accounts, Tsar Nicholas II conferred the title of "Grandmaster of Chess" on each of the five finalists (Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine, Siegbert Tarrasch, and Frank Marshall).
The Tsar reportedly awarded the title to the five finalists: Emanuel Lasker, José Raúl Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine, Siegbert Tarrasch, and Frank Marshall.

Peter Romanovsky

Romanovsky
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
At the beginning of his career in Saint Petersburg, he shared fourth place in 1908 (Sergey von Freymann and Karl Wilhelm Rosenkrantz won), tied for 10–11th in 1909 (Alexander Alekhine won), took second place behind Smorodsky in 1913, and shared first with von Freymann in 1914 (Hexagonal).

Alexey Selezniev

SeleznievSelesnievAlex Selesnev
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
In July/August 1914, he played in Mannheim (19th DSB Congress), and tied for 6-10th in interrupted tournament (Hauptturnier A). After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven “Russian players” (Alekhine, Bogoljubow, Bogatyrchuk, Flamberg, Koppelman, Maliutin, Rabinovich, Romanovsky, Saburov, Selezniev, Weinstein) from the Mannheim tournament were interned by Germany.

Samuil Vainshtein

WeinsteinSamuil Weinstein
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven Russian players (Alekhine, Bogoljubow, Bogatyrchuk, Flamberg, Koppelman, Maljutin, Rabinovich, Romanovsky, Saburov, Selezniev, Weinstein) from the Mannheim tournament were interned in Germany.

Frank Marshall (chess player)

Frank MarshallMarshallFrank J. Marshall
By some accounts, Tsar Nicholas II conferred the title of "Grandmaster of Chess" on each of the five finalists (Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine, Siegbert Tarrasch, and Frank Marshall).
Marshall finished fifth at the St. Petersburg tournament in 1914, behind World Champion Lasker, future World Champions Capablanca and Alekhine, and former World Championship challenger Tarrasch, but ahead of the players who did not qualify for the final: Ossip Bernstein, Rubinstein, Nimzowitsch, Blackburne, Janowski, and Gunsberg.

N. Koppelman

Koppelman
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alexander Alekhine, Bogoljubov, Bogatyrchuk, Flamberg, Koppelman, Maliutin, Rabinovich, Romanovsky, Saburov, Selezniev, Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.

Ilya Rabinovich

Rabinovich
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
After the declaration of war for World War I against Russia, eleven 'Russian' players (Alexander Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubow, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maljutin, Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Peter Petrovich Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) from the Mannheim tournament were interned by Germany.

Boris Maliutin

MaljutinMaliutinBoris E. Maliutin
After the declaration of war against Russia, eleven "Russian" players (Alekhine, Efim Bogoljubov, Fedor Bogatyrchuk, Alexander Flamberg, N. Koppelman, Boris Maliutin, Ilya Rabinovich, Peter Romanovsky, Pyotr Saburov, Alexey Selezniev, and Samuil Weinstein) were interned in Rastatt, Germany.
took 6th in 1906, took 4th in 1907, took 3rd in 1908, tied for 4-6th in 1909 (Alexander Alekhine won), took 5th and tied for 12-13th in 1911 (Stepan Levitsky won).