Alexander Borodinwikipedia
Alexander Porfiryevich Borodin (12 November 183327 February 1887) was a Russian Romantic composer of Georgian-Russian origin who was a doctor and chemist by profession and made important early contributions to the field of organic chemistry.
BorodinAlexander BorodinAleksandr BorodinBorodin, AlexanderIgor, Galitsky, Skula, KonchakBorodineA. BorodinБородинBorodin, Aleksandr

Prince Igor

Prince IgorComposition historyopera
Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, the tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor. In 1868 Borodin became distracted from initial work on the second symphony by preoccupation with the opera Prince Igor, which is seen by some to be his most significant work and one of the most important historical Russian operas.
Prince Igor (Князь Игорь, Knyaz' Igor' ) is an opera in four acts with a prologue, written and composed by Alexander Borodin.

Kismet (musical)

Kismet1953 musicalKizmet
Music from Prince Igor and his string quartets was later adapted for the US musical Kismet. The evocative characteristics of Borodin's music made possible the adaptation of his compositions in the 1953 musical Kismet, by Robert Wright and George Forrest, notably in the songs "Stranger in Paradise" and "And This Is My Beloved".
Kismet is a musical with lyrics and musical adaptation (as well as some original music) by Robert Wright and George Forrest, adapted from the music of Alexander Borodin, and a book by Charles Lederer and Luther Davis, based on Kismet, the 1911 play by Edward Knoblock.

The Five (composers)

The FiveRussian FiveThe Mighty Handful
Musically, he was one of the prominent 19th-century composers known as The Mighty Handful, a group dedicated to producing a uniquely Russian kind of classical music, rather than imitating earlier Western European models.
Mily Balakirev (the leader), César Cui, Modest Mussorgsky, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Alexander Borodin all lived in Saint Petersburg, and collaborated from 1856 to 1870.

Aldol reaction

aldol reactionaldolaldol addition
As a chemist, he is best known for his work in organic synthesis, including being among the first chemists to demonstrate nucleophilic substitution, as well as being the co-discoverer of the aldol reaction.
Discovered independently by the Russian chemist Alexander Borodin in 1869 See:

In the Steppes of Central Asia

Musical Picture: ''In Central Asia
Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, the tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor.
In the Steppes of Central Asia (Russian: В средней Азии, V srednyeĭ Azii, literally In Central Asia) is the common English title for a "musical tableau" (or symphonic poem) by Alexander Borodin, composed in 1880.

Mily Balakirev

BalakirevMily BalakirevMiliy Balakirev
He began taking lessons in composition from Mily Balakirev in 1862.
In conjunction with critic and fellow nationalist Vladimir Stasov, in the late-1850s and early 1860s Balakirev brought together the composers now known as The Five (a.k.a. The Mighty Handful)—the others were Alexander Borodin, César Cui, Modest Mussorgsky and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.

Tikhvin Cemetery

Tikhvin CemeteriesPeterburg NecropolisAlexander Nevsky Lavra
He died suddenly during a ball at the Academy, and was interred in Tikhvin Cemetery at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery in Saint Petersburg.

Polovtsian Dances

Polovtsian Dances And ChorusPolovtsian Dances (ballet)Polovetzian
It contains the Polovtsian Dances, often performed as a stand-alone concert work forming what is probably Borodin's best-known composition.
The Polovtsian Dances, or Polovetsian Dances ( from the Russian "Polovtsy"—the name given to the Kipchaks and Cumans by the Rus' people) form an exotic scene at the end of Act II of Alexander Borodin's opera Prince Igor.

Alexander Glazunov

GlazunovAlexander GlazunovA. Glazunov
Two years later he began composing a third symphony, but left it unfinished at his death; two movements of it were later completed and orchestrated by Alexander Glazunov.
While he was the direct successor to Balakirev's nationalism, he tended more towards Borodin's epic grandeur while absorbing a number of other influences.

Symphonic poem

symphonic poemtone poemtone poems
Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, the tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor.
Macdonald calls Modest Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain and Alexander Borodin's In the Steppes of Central Asia "powerful orchestral pictures, each unique in its composer's output".

String Quartet No. 2 (Borodin)

String Quartet No. 2String Quartet No. 2 in Dsecond string quartet
His Second Quartet, in which his strong lyricism is represented in the popular "Nocturne", followed in 1881.
The String Quartet No. 2 is a string quartet in D major written by Alexander Borodin in 1881.

Alexander Dianin

His successor in the chemistry chair at the Medical-Surgical academy was his son-in-law and fellow chemist, Alexander Dianin.
He was married to the adopted daughter of fellow chemist Alexander Borodin.

Heinz Hunsdiecker

Heinz
It was Cläre Hunsdiecker and her husband Heinz, however, who developed Borodin's work into a general method, for which they were granted a US patent in 1939, and which they published in Chemische Berichte in 1942.
Heinz Hunsdiecker (22 January 1904 – 22 November 1981) was a German chemist who together with his wife Cläre Hunsdiecker (Claire Hunsdiecker) (1903–1995) improved a reaction of Alexander Borodin now known as the Hunsdiecker reaction.

Hunsdiecker reaction

Hunsdiecker-type reactionsHunsdiecker
The method is generally known as either the Hunsdiecker reaction or the Hunsdiecker–Borodin reaction.
The reaction was first demonstrated by Alexander Borodin in his 1861 reports of the preparation of methyl bromide from silver acetate.

Franz Liszt

LisztFranz LisztLisztian
Borodin's fame outside the Russian Empire was made possible during his lifetime by Franz Liszt, who arranged a performance of the Symphony No. 1 in Germany in 1880, and by the Comtesse de Mercy-Argenteau in Belgium and France.
He was a friend, musical promoter and benefactor to many composers of his time, including Frédéric Chopin, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg, Ole Bull, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka, and Alexander Borodin.

George Forrest (author)

George ForrestChet ForrestForrest
The evocative characteristics of Borodin's music made possible the adaptation of his compositions in the 1953 musical Kismet, by Robert Wright and George Forrest, notably in the songs "Stranger in Paradise" and "And This Is My Beloved".
George Forrest (born George Forrest Chichester Jr., July 31, 1915 – October 10, 1999) was a writer of music and lyrics for musical theatre best known for the show Kismet, adapted from the works of Alexander Borodin.

Symphony

symphonysymphoniessymphonic
Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, the tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor.
If the symphony had been eclipsed, it was not long before it re-emerged in a "second age" in the 1870s and 1880s, with the symphonies of Anton Bruckner, Johannes Brahms, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Camille Saint-Saëns, Alexander Borodin, Antonín Dvořák, and César Franck—works which continued to dominate the concert repertory for at least a century.

Stranger in Paradise (song)

Stranger in ParadiseStranger in Paradise" (song)A Stranger in Paradise
The evocative characteristics of Borodin's music made possible the adaptation of his compositions in the 1953 musical Kismet, by Robert Wright and George Forrest, notably in the songs "Stranger in Paradise" and "And This Is My Beloved".
Like almost all the music in that show, the melody was taken from music composed by Alexander Borodin (1833–1887), in this case, the "Gliding Dance of the Maidens", from the Polovtsian Dances in the opera Prince Igor (1890).

String quartet

string quartetstring quartetsquartet
Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, the tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor.

Robert Wright (writer)

Robert WrightBob WrightRobert C. Wright
The evocative characteristics of Borodin's music made possible the adaptation of his compositions in the 1953 musical Kismet, by Robert Wright and George Forrest, notably in the songs "Stranger in Paradise" and "And This Is My Beloved".
Robert (Bob) Craig Wright (September 25, 1914 – July 27, 2005) was an American composer-lyricist for Hollywood and the musical theatre best known for the Broadway musical and musical film Kismet, for which he and his professional partner George Forrest adapted themes by Alexander Borodin and added lyrics.

Cumans

CumanCumansKuman
It is set in the 12th century, when the Russians, led by Prince Igor of Seversk, set out to conquer the barbarous Polovtsians by travelling Eastward across the Steppes.
Igor Svyatoslavich, prince of the Principality of Novgorod-Seversk, attacked the Cumans in the vicinity of the Kayala river in 1185 but was defeated; this battle was immortalized in the Rus' epic poem The Tale of Igor's Campaign, and Alexander Borodin's opera, Prince Igor.

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

Rimsky-KorsakovNikolai Rimsky-KorsakovNikolay Rimsky-Korsakov
In that same year Borodin started on his Symphony No. 2 in B minor, which was not particularly successful at its premiere in 1877 under Eduard Nápravník, but with some minor re-orchestration received a successful performance in 1879 by the Free Music School under Rimsky-Korsakov's direction.
He became friends with Alexander Borodin, whose music "astonished" him.

And This Is My Beloved

The evocative characteristics of Borodin's music made possible the adaptation of his compositions in the 1953 musical Kismet, by Robert Wright and George Forrest, notably in the songs "Stranger in Paradise" and "And This Is My Beloved".
Like all the music in that show, the melody was in fact based on music composed by Alexander Borodin, in this case, Borodin's String Quartet in D.

Modest Mussorgsky

MussorgskyModest MussorgskyMoussorgsky
In 1875 Borodin started his First String Quartet, much to the displeasure of Mussorgsky and Vladimir Stasov.
In October 1856 the 17-year-old Mussorgsky met the 22-year-old Alexander Borodin while both men served at a military hospital in Saint Petersburg.

Opera

operaopera singeroperas
In 1868 Borodin became distracted from initial work on the second symphony by preoccupation with the opera Prince Igor, which is seen by some to be his most significant work and one of the most important historical Russian operas.
After him, in the 19th century in Russia, there were written such operatic masterpieces as Rusalka and The Stone Guest by Alexander Dargomyzhsky, Boris Godunov and Khovanshchina by Modest Mussorgsky, Prince Igor by Alexander Borodin, Eugene Onegin and The Queen of Spades by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, and The Snow Maiden and Sadko by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.