Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianHamilton, AlexanderHamiltoniansA. HamiltonPhilip Hamilton Founding Fathers of the United Stateshis namesakeUS Custom HouseAlexander
Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.wikipedia
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Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.
Historian Richard B. Morris in 1973 identified the following seven figures as the key Founding Fathers: Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the main author of the economic policies of George Washington's administration.
He promoted and oversaw implementation of a strong, well-financed national government, but remained impartial in the fierce rivalry between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.

United States Coast Guard

Coast GuardU.S. Coast GuardUS Coast Guard
He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper.
Created by Congress on 4 August 1790 at the request of Alexander Hamilton as the Revenue Marine, it is the oldest continuous seagoing service of the United States.

The Federalist Papers

PubliusThe FederalistFederalist
He helped ratify the Constitution by writing 51 of the 85 installments of The Federalist Papers, which are still used as one of the most important references for Constitutional interpretation.
The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper.
The Federalist Party came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies.

Burr–Hamilton duel

duela duel1804 duel
Taking offense, Burr challenged him to a duel on July 11, 1804, in which Burr shot and mortally wounded Hamilton, who died the following day.
The Burr–Hamilton duel was fought between prominent American politicians Aaron Burr, the sitting Vice President of the United States, and Alexander Hamilton, the former Secretary of the Treasury, at Weehawken, New Jersey.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
He called for mobilization against the French First Republic in 1798–99 under President John Adams, and became Commanding General of the previously disbanded U.S. Army, which he reconstituted, modernized, and readied for war.
He then won election in 1796 as president; during his single term, he encountered fierce criticism from the Jeffersonian Republicans and from some in his own Federalist Party, led by his rival Alexander Hamilton.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
Hamilton played a central role in the Federalist party, which dominated national and state politics until it lost the election of 1800 to Jefferson's Democratic-Republican Party.
The Democratic-Republican Party (formally the Republican Party) was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.

Aaron Burr

Burr, AaronAaron Burr, Jr.Burr
Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied for the presidency in the electoral college in 1801, and Hamilton helped to defeat Burr, whom he found unprincipled, and to elect Jefferson despite philosophical differences.
Burr shot his political rival Alexander Hamilton in a famous duel in 1804, the last full year of his single term as vice president.

The Bank of New York Mellon

BNY MellonThe Bank of New YorkBank of New York Mellon
He resigned to practice law and founded the Bank of New York.
Through its Bank of New York predecessor, it is one of the three oldest banking corporations in the United States, and among the oldest banks in the world, having been established in June 1784 by a group that included American Founding Fathers Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.

Nevis

West IndiesislandIsland of Nevis
Hamilton was born out of wedlock in Charlestown, Nevis.
Nevis is of particular historical significance to Americans because it was the birthplace and early childhood home of Alexander Hamilton.

First Bank of the United States

Bank of the United Statesnational bankFirst
He took the lead in the Federal government's funding of the states' debts, as well as establishing a national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain.
Establishment of the Bank of the United States was part of a three-part expansion of federal fiscal and monetary power, along with a federal mint and excise taxes, championed by Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the Treasury.

Philolexian Society

Philolexian Award for Distinguished Literary AchievementPhilolexianPhilolexian Prize
Hamilton, Troup, and four other undergraduates formed an unnamed literary society that is regarded as a precursor of the Philolexian Society.
The society traces its roots to a literary society founded by, then student, Alexander Hamilton in the 1770s.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper.
Toward the close of these discussions, on September 8, a "Committee of Style and Arrangement" – Alexander Hamilton (New York), William Samuel Johnson (Connecticut), Rufus King (Massachusetts), James Madison (Virginia), and Gouverneur Morris (Pennsylvania) – was appointed to distill a final draft constitution from the twenty-three approved articles.

Edward Stevens (diplomat)

Edward Stevens
Some clues have led to speculating that Stevens may have been Alexander Hamilton's biological father: his son Edward Stevens became a close friend of Hamilton, the two boys were described as looking much alike, both were fluent in French and shared similar interests.
He was a close friend of American soldier and statesman Alexander Hamilton.

A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress

Church of England clergyman Samuel Seabury published a series of pamphlets promoting the Loyalist cause in 1774, to which Hamilton responded anonymously with his first political writings, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress and The Farmer Refuted. Seabury essentially tried to provoke fear in the colonies, and his main objective was to stop the potential union among the colonies.
A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress was one of Alexander Hamilton's first published works, published in December 1774, while Hamilton was a 19-year-old student at King's College in New York City.

Samuel Seabury

Bishop SeaburyBishop Samuel Seaburyfirst Episcopal bishop in America
Church of England clergyman Samuel Seabury published a series of pamphlets promoting the Loyalist cause in 1774, to which Hamilton responded anonymously with his first political writings, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress and The Farmer Refuted. Seabury essentially tried to provoke fear in the colonies, and his main objective was to stop the potential union among the colonies.
He was a leading Loyalist in New York City during the American Revolution and a known rival of Alexander Hamilton.

Saint Croix

St. CroixSt CroixSanta Cruz
Hamilton's mother had been married previously to Johann Michael Lavien, a Danish or German merchant, on St. Croix in the Virgin Islands, then ruled by Denmark.
Alexander Hamilton and his brother lived with their mother Rachel Faucette on Saint Croix, after she returned to the island in 1765.

Implied powers

implied powerpowers that were not expressly definedimplied authority
Hamilton successfully argued that the implied powers of the Constitution provided the legal authority to fund the national debt, to assume states' debts, and to create the government-backed Bank of the United States.
When George Washington asked Alexander Hamilton to defend the constitutionality of the First Bank of the United States against the protests of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Attorney General Edmund Randolph, Hamilton produced what has now become the classic statement for implied powers.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
James Madison joined Hamilton in influencing Congress to send a delegation to persuade Rhode Island to change its mind.
After the Convention, Madison became one of the leaders in the movement to ratify the Constitution, and his collaboration with Alexander Hamilton produced The Federalist Papers, among the most important treatises in support of the Constitution.

Robert Morris (financier)

Robert MorrisMorrisRobert Morris the younger
Several Congressmen, including Hamilton, Robert Morris and Gouverneur Morris (no relation), attempted to use this Newburgh Conspiracy as leverage to secure support from the states and in Congress for funding of the national government.
Along with Alexander Hamilton and Albert Gallatin, he is widely regarded as one of the founders of the financial system of the United States.

Richard Brookhiser

Brookhiser, Richard
Richard Brookhiser noted that "a man is more likely to know his own birthday than a probate court."
He is most widely known for a series of biographies of America's founders, including Alexander Hamilton, Gouverneur Morris, and George Washington.

John Jay

JayChief Justice John JayGovernor John Jay
Through his connections with influential New York patriots such as Alexander McDougall and John Jay, Hamilton raised the New York Provincial Company of Artillery of sixty men in 1776, and was elected captain.
He was a co-author of The Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, and wrote five of the 85 essays.

Robert Troup

His college roommate and lifelong friend Robert Troup spoke glowingly of Hamilton's clarity in concisely explaining the patriots' case against the British in what is credited as Hamilton's first public appearance, on July 6, 1774, at the Liberty Pole at King's College.
At college, he was the roommate of Alexander Hamilton.

Quasi-War

undeclared warwar with Francea threatened war with France
The army did not see combat in the Quasi-War, and Hamilton was outraged by Adams' diplomatic success in resolving the crisis with France.
The unexpected fighting ability of the newly re-established U.S. Navy, which concentrated on attacking the French West Indian trade, together with the growing weaknesses and final overthrow of the ruling French Directory, led Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord (known as Talleyrand) to reopen negotiations with the US. At the same time, President John Adams feuded with Hamilton over control of the Adams administration.