Alexander Melville Bell

Bell's fatherBell, Alexander MelvilleMelville Bell
Alexander Melville Bell (1 March 18197 August 1905) was a teacher and researcher of physiological phonetics and was the author of numerous works on orthoepy and elocution.wikipedia
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Visible Speech

an ingenious iconic phonetic alphabetBell's Visible Speechphonetic alphabet
Additionally he was also the creator of Visible Speech which was used to help the deaf learn to talk, and was the father of Alexander Graham Bell.
Visible Speech is a system of phonetic symbols developed by Alexander Melville Bell in 1867 to represent the position of the speech organs in articulating sounds.

Alexander Graham Bell

BellGraham BellBell, Alexander Graham
Additionally he was also the creator of Visible Speech which was used to help the deaf learn to talk, and was the father of Alexander Graham Bell.
His father was Professor Alexander Melville Bell, a phonetician, and his mother was Eliza Grace (née Symonds).

Phonetics

phoneticphoneticallyphonetician
Alexander Melville Bell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and studied under and became the principal assistant of his father, Alexander Bell (1790–1865), an authority on phonetics and speech disorders.
This early period of modern phonetics included the development of an influential phonetic alphabet based on articulatory positions by Alexander Melville Bell.

Elocution

enunciationelocutionisteloquence
Alexander Melville Bell (1 March 18197 August 1905) was a teacher and researcher of physiological phonetics and was the author of numerous works on orthoepy and elocution. From 1843 to 1865 he lectured on speech elocution at the University of Edinburgh, and from 1865 to 1870 at the University of London.
The era of the elocution movement, defined by the likes of Sheridan and Walker, evolved in the early and mid-1800's into what is called the scientific movement of elocution, defined in the early period by James Rush's The Philosophy of the Human Voice (1827) and Richard Whately's Elements of Rhetoric (1828), and in the later period by Alexander Melville Bell's A New Elucidation of Principles of Elocution (1849) and Visible Speech (1867).

Volta Laboratory and Bureau

Volta LaboratoryVolta BureauVolta Laboratory Association
In 1887, his son, Alexander Graham Bell, sold off the intellectual assets owned by the Volta Laboratory Association.
In 1889, Bell and his family moved from their Brodhead-Bell mansion to a new home close to his father, Alexander Melville Bell.

Rock Creek Cemetery

Melville Bell died at age 86 in 1905 due to pneumonia after an operation for diabetes, and was interred in Washington, D.C.'s Rock Creek Cemetery adjacent to the Hubbard • Bell • Grossman • Pillot Memorial, alongside his wife and other members of the Bell and Grosvenor families.
Melville Bell (1819–1905), Scottish teacher and inventor, father of Alexander Graham Bell, Hubbard Bell Grossman Pillot Memorial (section A)

Bell House (Colonial Beach, Virginia)

Bell House
The Bell House at Colonial Beach, Virginia was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987.
Alexander Graham Bell inherited the property in 1907 from his father Alexander Melville Bell, who acquired it in 1886, and held it continuously until 1918.

Hubbard Bell Grossman Pillot Memorial

Grosvenor is buriedHubbard • Bell • Grossman • Pillot Memorial
Melville Bell died at age 86 in 1905 due to pneumonia after an operation for diabetes, and was interred in Washington, D.C.'s Rock Creek Cemetery adjacent to the Hubbard • Bell • Grossman • Pillot Memorial, alongside his wife and other members of the Bell and Grosvenor families.
Alexander Graham Bell's parents, Alexander Melville Bell and Eliza Grace Symonds Bell, are also buried here along with fourteen other individuals marked by bronze markers.

Articulatory phonetics

articulatoryarticulationarticulators
Alexander Melville Bell (1 March 18197 August 1905) was a teacher and researcher of physiological phonetics and was the author of numerous works on orthoepy and elocution.

Orthoepy

orthoepicaldictionorthoepeia
Alexander Melville Bell (1 March 18197 August 1905) was a teacher and researcher of physiological phonetics and was the author of numerous works on orthoepy and elocution. In 1870 he became a lecturer on philology at Queen's College, Kingston, Ontario; and in 1881 he moved to Washington, D.C. at the suggestion of his son Graham, where he devoted himself to the education of the deaf by the use of Visible Speech in which the alphabetical characters of his linguistic invention were representative graphic diagrams for the various positions and motions of the lips, tongue, mouth, etc., as well as other methods of orthoepy.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh, ScotlandCity of EdinburghCity of Edinburgh council area
Alexander Melville Bell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and studied under and became the principal assistant of his father, Alexander Bell (1790–1865), an authority on phonetics and speech disorders.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
Alexander Melville Bell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and studied under and became the principal assistant of his father, Alexander Bell (1790–1865), an authority on phonetics and speech disorders.

University of Edinburgh

EdinburghEdinburgh UniversityThe University of Edinburgh
From 1843 to 1865 he lectured on speech elocution at the University of Edinburgh, and from 1865 to 1870 at the University of London.

University of London

LondonLondon Universitythe University of London
From 1843 to 1865 he lectured on speech elocution at the University of Edinburgh, and from 1865 to 1870 at the University of London.

Naval surgeon

ship's surgeonsurgeonship's doctor
Melville married Eliza Grace Symonds (d. Georgetown, Washington, D.C., 5 January 1897), the only daughter of a British naval surgeon.

Lowell Institute

Lowell LecturesLowell Lectureship
In 1868, and again in 1870 and 1871, Melville lectured at the Lowell Institute in Boston, Massachusetts after having moved to Canada.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
In 1868, and again in 1870 and 1871, Melville lectured at the Lowell Institute in Boston, Massachusetts after having moved to Canada.

Philology

philologistphilologicalgrammarian
In 1870 he became a lecturer on philology at Queen's College, Kingston, Ontario; and in 1881 he moved to Washington, D.C. at the suggestion of his son Graham, where he devoted himself to the education of the deaf by the use of Visible Speech in which the alphabetical characters of his linguistic invention were representative graphic diagrams for the various positions and motions of the lips, tongue, mouth, etc., as well as other methods of orthoepy.

Queen's University

QueenQueen's CollegeQueen’s University
In 1870 he became a lecturer on philology at Queen's College, Kingston, Ontario; and in 1881 he moved to Washington, D.C. at the suggestion of his son Graham, where he devoted himself to the education of the deaf by the use of Visible Speech in which the alphabetical characters of his linguistic invention were representative graphic diagrams for the various positions and motions of the lips, tongue, mouth, etc., as well as other methods of orthoepy.

Royal Scottish Society of Arts

PRSSAFRSSAFSSA
He became a Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotland, the Royal Scottish Society of Arts, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as obtaining memberships in other societies.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

AAASAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)A.A.A.S.
He became a Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotland, the Royal Scottish Society of Arts, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as obtaining memberships in other societies.

Consonant

consonantsCconson.
To promote the language, Bell created two written short forms using his system of 29 modifiers and tones, 52 consonants, 36 vowels and a dozen diphthongs: World English, which was similar to the International Phonetic Alphabet, and also Line Writing, used as a shorthand form for stenographers.

Vowel

vowelsvowel heightV
To promote the language, Bell created two written short forms using his system of 29 modifiers and tones, 52 consonants, 36 vowels and a dozen diphthongs: World English, which was similar to the International Phonetic Alphabet, and also Line Writing, used as a shorthand form for stenographers.

Diphthong

diphthongsfalling diphthongrising diphthong
To promote the language, Bell created two written short forms using his system of 29 modifiers and tones, 52 consonants, 36 vowels and a dozen diphthongs: World English, which was similar to the International Phonetic Alphabet, and also Line Writing, used as a shorthand form for stenographers.

International English

World EnglishEnglish as an international languageGlobal English
To promote the language, Bell created two written short forms using his system of 29 modifiers and tones, 52 consonants, 36 vowels and a dozen diphthongs: World English, which was similar to the International Phonetic Alphabet, and also Line Writing, used as a shorthand form for stenographers.