Alfie (1966 film)

Alfie1966 film19661966 British film of the same name1966 versionAlfie'' (1966 film)British filmBritish film of the same namefeature film of the same namefilm of the same name
Alfie is a 1966 British romantic comedy-drama film directed by Lewis Gilbert and starring Michael Caine.wikipedia
196 Related Articles

Michael Caine

Sir Michael CaineAlfredCained
Alfie is a 1966 British romantic comedy-drama film directed by Lewis Gilbert and starring Michael Caine. Despite having played "Alfie" on Broadway, Terence Stamp categorically declined to reprise the role on film, so he and casting agents approached his good friend and then roommate Michael Caine: not one to then snub a role about a common man, Caine agreed to do it.
He made his breakthrough in the 1960s with starring roles in British films, including Zulu (1964), The Ipcress File (1965), Alfie (1966), for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, The Italian Job (1969), and Battle of Britain (1969).

Lewis Gilbert

Gilbert
Alfie is a 1966 British romantic comedy-drama film directed by Lewis Gilbert and starring Michael Caine.
Lewis Gilbert (6 March 1920 – 23 February 2018) was a British film director, producer and screenwriter, who directed more than 40 films during six decades; among them such varied titles as Reach for the Sky (1956), Sink the Bismarck! (1960), Alfie (1966), Educating Rita (1983) and Shirley Valentine (1989), as well as three James Bond films: You Only Live Twice (1967), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979).

Alfie (play)

AlfieAlfie!Alfie'' (play)
It is an adaptation by Bill Naughton of his own novel and play of the same name.
The play was adapted into a film twice, a 1966 version starring Michael Caine and a 2004 version starring Jude Law.

Vivien Merchant

Alfie spends time in a convalescent home, where he befriends a fellow patient named Harry (Alfie Bass), a family man devoted to his frumpy wife Lily (Vivien Merchant).
For her role in the film Alfie (1966), she received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress, and won the BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer.

Shelley Winters

Alfie is released from the home and meets Ruby (Shelley Winters), an older, voluptuous, affluent and promiscuous American, while freelancing taking holiday photos of tourists near the Tower of London.
Other roles Winters appeared in include A Double Life (1947), The Night of the Hunter (1955), Lolita (1962), Alfie (1966), and Pete's Dragon (1977).

Julia Foster

He ends an affair with a married woman, Siddie (Millicent Martin), just as he gets his submissive single girlfriend, Gilda (Julia Foster), pregnant.
Foster's credits include the films The System (1964) with Oliver Reed, The Bargee (1964) with Harry H. Corbett, Alfie (1966) with Michael Caine, Half a Sixpence (1967) with Tommy Steele, and Percy (1971) with Hywel Bennett.

Jane Asher

Jane
Later, Alfie picks up a young hitchhiker, Annie from Sheffield (Jane Asher) who is looking to make a fresh start in London and moves in with him.
Asher has appeared in TV shows and films such as Deep End, The Masque of the Red Death, Alfie, The Mistress, Crossroads, Death at a Funeral, and The Old Guys.

Denholm Elliott

Denholm Mitchell Elliott
Some of his well-known roles include the abortionist in Alfie (1966), Marcus Brody in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Coleman in Trading Places (1983), and Mr. Emerson in A Room with a View (1985).

Alfie Bass

Alfie spends time in a convalescent home, where he befriends a fellow patient named Harry (Alfie Bass), a family man devoted to his frumpy wife Lily (Vivien Merchant).
He also appeared in a number of feature films including The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), Hell Drivers (1957), A Tale of Two Cities (1958) and Alfie (1966) starring Michael Caine and Shelley Winters.

Bill Naughton

It is an adaptation by Bill Naughton of his own novel and play of the same name.
Although best remembered for his play, Alfie, mostly because of the British film starring Michael Caine in the eponymous role, Naughton was a prolific writer of plays, novels, short stories and children's books.

Fourth wall

breaking the fourth wallbreaks the fourth wallbreak the fourth wall
Alfie frequently breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera narrating and justifying his actions.
In Alfie, Michael Caine frequently addresses the viewer.

Eleanor Bron

Other roles included the doctor who grounds Michael Caine's character in Alfie (1966), the unattainable Margaret Spencer in Peter Cook and Dudley Moore's film Bedazzled (1967), Hermione Roddice in Ken Russell's Women in Love (1969) and Sisters McFee and MacArthur in The National Health (1973).

Graham Stark

Graham Starke
Over time, Alfie becomes attached to his son, but his unwillingness to commit to Gilda causes her to break up with him and instead marry Humphrey (Graham Stark), a kindly bus conductor who loves her and is willing to accept Malcolm as his own son.
Stark gave a moving performance in the film Alfie (1966) as Humphrey, a timid bus conductor who takes on a woman (Julia Foster) and her child when the title character (played by Michael Caine) refuses commitment.

Queenie Watts

In 1966 she appeared in the film version of Alfie, singing "Goodbye, Dolly Gray" in a memorable, riotous bar-room brawl sequence, and also appeared as a pub singer in the Tommy Steele film Half a Sixpence in 1967.

Twickenham Studios

Twickenham Film StudiosTwickenhamTwickenham Film Distributors
It was shot at Twickenham Studios with scenes shot at several locations in London; including Waterloo Bridge which is seen at the beginning and end of the film where the title character walks into the distance accompanied by a stray dog and Tower Bridge which is the backdrop for the photography scene with Shelley Winters.
In the 1960s classic films such as Alfie (1966) starring Michael Caine, The Italian Job (1969), featuring Caine and Noël Coward, and Roman Polanski's first English language film Repulsion (1965) were made at Twickenham.

Murray Melvin

Lewis Gilbert cast Melvin in H.M.S. Defiant (1962), alongside Dirk Bogarde, and in Alfie, where he played Michael Caine's work friend, stealing petrol and taking photographs to sell to tourists.

Cockney

Cockney accentCockney EnglishCockney dialect
Handsome Cockney chauffeur Alfie Elkins

James Booth

Several well-known actors, including Richard Harris, Laurence Harvey, James Booth and Anthony Newley turned down the title role due to the then-taboo subject matter.
Booth also turned down the lead role of Alfie.

Alfie (Sonny Rollins album)

AlfieAlfie'' (Sonny Rollins album)Rollins's Impulse! album
The Sonny Rollins album Alfie, orchestrated and conducted by Oliver Nelson, was recorded in New Jersey, United States in January 1966.
Alfie is a 1966 album by jazz saxophonist Sonny Rollins of music composed for the film of the same name.

Terence Stamp

Terrence StampSir Terrence Stamp
Despite having played "Alfie" on Broadway, Terence Stamp categorically declined to reprise the role on film, so he and casting agents approached his good friend and then roommate Michael Caine: not one to then snub a role about a common man, Caine agreed to do it.
Stamp was considered for the title role of Alfie (1966), but turned it down in favour of Modesty Blaise (1966).

Millicent Martin

Mainly MillicentMilicent Martin
He ends an affair with a married woman, Siddie (Millicent Martin), just as he gets his submissive single girlfriend, Gilda (Julia Foster), pregnant.
In the mid-1960s, Martin appeared in British feature films Nothing But the Best (1964), Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines (1965), Stop the World – I Want to Get Off (1966), and Alfie (1966).

Stan Tracey

Stan Tracey Big BandStan Tracey QuartetStanley William Tracey
The original film soundtrack featured jazz saxophonist Sonny Rollins with local musicians from London including Stan Tracey on piano, who improvised "Little Malcolm Loves His Dad" (although never credited), Rick Laird on bass, Phil Seamen on drums, Ronnie Scott on tenor sax.
It is Tracey on piano that film viewers hear behind Rollins on the soundtrack of the Michael Caine version of Alfie (1966).

Cher

Georganne LaPiereStarCher as a gay icon
The title song, "Alfie", written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, was sung by Cher over the film's closing credits in the US release reaching #32 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.
Chér, also released in 1966, contains the Burt Bacharach and Hal David composition "Alfie", which was added to the credits of the American version of the 1966 film of the same name and became the first stateside version of the popular song.

Sonny Rollins

RollinsRollins, SonnySonny Rawlins
The original film soundtrack featured jazz saxophonist Sonny Rollins with local musicians from London including Stan Tracey on piano, who improvised "Little Malcolm Loves His Dad" (although never credited), Rick Laird on bass, Phil Seamen on drums, Ronnie Scott on tenor sax.
Upon signing with Impulse! Records, he released a soundtrack to the 1966 film Alfie, as well as There Will Never Be Another You and Sonny Rollins on Impulse! After East Broadway Run Down (1966), which featured trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, bassist Jimmy Garrison, and drummer Elvin Jones, Rollins did not release another studio album for six years.