Alfred Blalock

Dr. Alfred BlalockBlalockDr. Blalock
Alfred Blalock (April 5, 1899 – September 15, 1964) was an American surgeon most noted for his research on the medical condition of shock as well as Tetralogy of Fallot— commonly known as Blue baby syndrome.wikipedia
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Vivien Thomas

Vivian ThomasThomas, VivienVivien T. Thomas
He developed the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig Shunt, a surgical procedure he developed together with surgical assistant Vivien Thomas and pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig to relieve the cyanosis from Tetralogy of Fallot.
He was the assistant to surgeon Alfred Blalock in Blalock's experimental animal laboratory at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and later at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Cardiology

cardiologistcardiologistscardiovascular medicine
He developed the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig Shunt, a surgical procedure he developed together with surgical assistant Vivien Thomas and pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig to relieve the cyanosis from Tetralogy of Fallot.
She worked with Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas at the Johns Hopkins Hospital where they experimented with dogs to look at how they would attempt to surgically cure these "blue babies."

Vanderbilt University

VanderbiltOberlin Graduate School of TheologyVanderbilt Divinity School
Blalock worked at both Vanderbilt University and the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied both as an undergraduate and worked as chief of surgery. In September 1925, Blalock joined Tinsley Harrison at Vanderbilt University in Nashville to complete his residency under Barney Brooks, Vanderbilt University Hospital's first Professor of Surgery and Chief of the Surgical Service.
Alfred Blalock, Professor of Surgery, and his assistant Vivian Thomas identified a decrease in blood volume and fluid loss outside the vascular bed as a key factor in traumatic shock and pioneered the use of replacement fluids for its treatment.

Blalock–Taussig shunt

Blalock-Taussig shuntBlalock-Thomas-Taussig shuntBlalock Taussig shunt
He developed the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig Shunt, a surgical procedure he developed together with surgical assistant Vivien Thomas and pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig to relieve the cyanosis from Tetralogy of Fallot.
The original procedure was named for Alfred Blalock, surgeon, Culloden, GA (1899–1964), Helen B. Taussig, cardiologist, Baltimore/Boston (1898–1986) and Vivien Thomas (1910–1985) who was at that time Blalock's laboratory assistant.

Alpha Omega Alpha

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical SocietyAlpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor SocietyAlpha Omega Alpha (AOA)
At Johns Hopkins, his record was not considered "outstanding", given that he graduated near the middle of his class, although he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha (member 0114794).

Culloden, Georgia

Culloden
Blalock was born in Culloden, Georgia, the son of Martha "Mattie" (Davis) and George Zadock Blalock, a merchant.
* Alfred Blalock, surgeon who developed the Blalock–Taussig shunt to relieve the cyanosis of Tetralogy of Fallot, leading to the modern era of cardiac surgery.

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineJohns Hopkins Medical SchoolJohns Hopkins Medicine
After graduating with an A.B. in 1918 at the age of 19, Blalock entered the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he roomed with and began a lifelong friendship with Tinsley Harrison, a student who would go on to specialize in cardiovascular medicine.

Tinsley R. Harrison

Tinsley HarrisonTinsley Randolph Harrison
After graduating with an A.B. in 1918 at the age of 19, Blalock entered the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he roomed with and began a lifelong friendship with Tinsley Harrison, a student who would go on to specialize in cardiovascular medicine.
His roommate and tennis partner at Johns Hopkins was Alfred Blalock, with whom he developed a close lifelong friendship.

Blue baby syndrome

blue babyblue babiesblue baby operation
Alfred Blalock (April 5, 1899 – September 15, 1964) was an American surgeon most noted for his research on the medical condition of shock as well as Tetralogy of Fallot— commonly known as Blue baby syndrome.
Through a collaboration between pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig, surgeon Alfred Blalock, and surgical technician Vivien Thomas, the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig shunt was created.

Helen B. Taussig

Helen TaussigHelen Brooke TaussigDr. Helen B. Taussig
He developed the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig Shunt, a surgical procedure he developed together with surgical assistant Vivien Thomas and pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig to relieve the cyanosis from Tetralogy of Fallot.
The procedure was developed by Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas, who were Taussig's colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Tetralogy of Fallot

Fallot's TetralogyTetrology of Fallotblue baby operation
He developed the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig Shunt, a surgical procedure he developed together with surgical assistant Vivien Thomas and pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig to relieve the cyanosis from Tetralogy of Fallot. Alfred Blalock (April 5, 1899 – September 15, 1964) was an American surgeon most noted for his research on the medical condition of shock as well as Tetralogy of Fallot— commonly known as Blue baby syndrome.
The procedure was conducted by surgeon Alfred Blalock and cardiologist Helen B. Taussig, with Vivien Thomas also providing substantial contributions and listed as an assistant.

Georgia Military College

Georgia MilitaryGeorgia Military Junior CollegeGeorgia Military and Agricultural College
At the age of 14, he entered as a senior at Georgia Military College, a preparatory school for the University of Georgia.

Something the Lord Made

In the 2004 HBO film Something the Lord Made about the Blalock-Thomas collaboration, Blalock was portrayed by Alan Rickman and Thomas by Mos Def.
Something the Lord Made is a 2004 American made-for-television biographical drama film about the black cardiac pioneer Vivien Thomas (1910–1985) and his complex and volatile partnership with white surgeon Alfred Blalock (1899–1964), the "Blue Baby doctor" who pioneered modern heart surgery.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Vanderbilt University HospitalMedical CenterVanderbilt Transplant Center
In September 1925, Blalock joined Tinsley Harrison at Vanderbilt University in Nashville to complete his residency under Barney Brooks, Vanderbilt University Hospital's first Professor of Surgery and Chief of the Surgical Service.

Alan Rickman

Sir Alan Rickman
In the 2004 HBO film Something the Lord Made about the Blalock-Thomas collaboration, Blalock was portrayed by Alan Rickman and Thomas by Mos Def.
He later starred in television films, playing the title character in Rasputin: Dark Servant of Destiny (1996), which won him a Golden Globe Award, an Emmy Award and a Screen Actors Guild Award, and Dr. Alfred Blalock in the Emmy-winning Something the Lord Made (2004).

Canada Gairdner International Award

Gairdner Foundation International AwardGairdner AwardGairdner Prize

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Johns HopkinsThe Johns Hopkins HospitalJohns Hopkins University Hospital
Many medical specialties were formed at the hospital including neurosurgery, by Dr. Harvey Cushing; cardiac surgery by Dr. Alfred Blalock; and child psychiatry, by Dr. Leo Kanner.

Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award

Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical ResearchAlbert Lasker Clinical Medical Research AwardLasker Award

Eileen Saxon

In 1944 Blalock, with Thomas by his side, performed the first "blue baby" operation on Eileen Saxon, a 15-month-old baby.
(now known as a Blalock–Thomas-Taussig shunt) suggested by pediatric cardiologist Helen B. Taussig and administered by Alfred Blalock, with Vivien Thomas, who had perfected the surgery in laboratory tests on animals, standing over his shoulder to advise him on performing the surgery.

Passano Foundation

Passano AwardPassano Foundation Award
Blalock also received the Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur, the Passano Award, the Matas Award, and the Henry Jacob Bigelow medal.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Alfred Blalock (April 5, 1899 – September 15, 1964) was an American surgeon most noted for his research on the medical condition of shock as well as Tetralogy of Fallot— commonly known as Blue baby syndrome.

Shock (circulatory)

shockcirculatory shocktraumatic shock
Alfred Blalock (April 5, 1899 – September 15, 1964) was an American surgeon most noted for his research on the medical condition of shock as well as Tetralogy of Fallot— commonly known as Blue baby syndrome.

Pediatrics

pediatricianpediatricpaediatrics
He developed the Blalock-Thomas-Taussig Shunt, a surgical procedure he developed together with surgical assistant Vivien Thomas and pediatric cardiologist Helen Taussig to relieve the cyanosis from Tetralogy of Fallot.

Johns Hopkins University

Johns HopkinsThe Johns Hopkins UniversityJohns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Blalock worked at both Vanderbilt University and the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied both as an undergraduate and worked as chief of surgery.