Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner

Lord MilnerAlfred MilnerSir Alfred MilnerMilnerViscount MilnerThe Viscount MilnerBaron MilnerLord Alfred MilnerAlfred, Lord MilnerThe Lord Milner
Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner, (23 March 185413 May 1925) was a British statesman and colonial administrator who played an influential leadership role in the formulation of foreign and domestic policy between the mid-1890s and early 1920s.wikipedia
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David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon. David Lloyd GeorgeBritish Prime Minister David Lloyd George
From December 1916 to November 1918, he was one of the most important members of David Lloyd George's War Cabinet.
In spring 1916, Alfred Milner hoped Lloyd George could be persuaded to bring down the coalition government by resigning, but this did not happen.

H. H. Asquith

AsquithAsquithianHerbert Henry Asquith
The choice was cordially approved by the leaders of the Liberal party and warmly recognized at a farewell dinner on 28 March 1897 presided over by the future prime minister Herbert Henry Asquith.
He sometimes debated against his Balliol contemporary Alfred Milner, who although then a Liberal was already an advocate of British imperialism.

King's College School

Kings College SchoolKing's College School, WimbledonKCS, Wimbledon
Their only son, Alfred Milner, was born in the Hessian town of Giessen and educated first at Tübingen, then at King's College School and, from 1872 to 1876, as a scholar of Balliol College, Oxford, studying under the classicist theologian Benjamin Jowett.
Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner, (1854–1925) statesman and colonial administrator

Potchefstroom High School for Boys

Potch Boys High
These schools include modern-day Pretoria High School for Girls, Pretoria Boys High School, Jeppe High School for Boys, King Edward VII School (Johannesburg), Potchefstroom High School for Boys and Hamilton Primary School.
With the Transvaal under British control, Lord Milner, the Colonial Secretary at the time created educational facilities (known as the Milner Schools) for English-speaking pupils.

Pretoria Boys High School

Pretoria Boys HighPretoria Boys
These schools include modern-day Pretoria High School for Girls, Pretoria Boys High School, Jeppe High School for Boys, King Edward VII School (Johannesburg), Potchefstroom High School for Boys and Hamilton Primary School.
Pretoria Boys High School, also known as Boys High, is a public, tuition charging, English medium boys high school located in Brooklyn, Pretoria, South Africa, founded in 1901 by The Rt Hon. Lord Milner.

King Edward VII School, Johannesburg

King Edward VII SchoolKing Edward VIIKing Edward VII High School
These schools include modern-day Pretoria High School for Girls, Pretoria Boys High School, Jeppe High School for Boys, King Edward VII School (Johannesburg), Potchefstroom High School for Boys and Hamilton Primary School.
The Milner Administration, in search of suitable buildings in which to establish temporary classrooms, found a vacant cigar factory in Johannesburg, on the corner of Gold and Kerk Streets, which was chosen as venue for "The Government High School for Boys", also known as the "Johannesburg High School for Boys".

Pretoria High School for Girls

Pretoria Girls High SchoolPretoria Girls' High SchoolPretoria Girls’ High School
These schools include modern-day Pretoria High School for Girls, Pretoria Boys High School, Jeppe High School for Boys, King Edward VII School (Johannesburg), Potchefstroom High School for Boys and Hamilton Primary School.
With Pretoria under British control, it became apparent to Lord Milner, the Colonial Secretary at the time, that the educational facilities in the city needed attention as there was no secondary school for English-speaking pupils (and it was Milner's intention to anglicise what would become the Transvaal).

Jan Smuts

SmutsGeneral SmutsJan Christiaan Smuts
Famously, after meeting Milner for the first time, Jan Smuts predicted that he would be "more dangerous than Rhodes" and would become "a second Bartle Frere".
Sir Alfred Milner, head of the British delegation, took exception to his dominance, and conflict between the two led to the collapse of the conference, consigning South Africa to war.

Cape Dutch

Cape-DutchDutch communitiesearly Cape settlers
To better understand the point of view of the Cape Dutch and the burghers of the Transvaal and Orange Free State, Milner also during this period learned both Dutch and the South African "Taal" Afrikaans.
As the Cape Dutch controlled over half the colonial legislature in the Cape Colony at the time, the perceived proliferation of pro-Boer sentiments led to unsuccessful attempts by Governor Lord Milner to disenfranchise them.

High Commissioner for Southern Africa

High CommissionerHigh Commission TerritoriesHigh Commissioner for South Africa
In April, Lord Rosmead resigned his posts of High Commissioner for Southern Africa and Governor of Cape Colony.

Milner's Kindergarten

To aid him in his task, Milner recruited a team of gifted young lawyers and administrators, most of them Oxford graduates, who became known as "Milner's Kindergarten".
Milner's Kindergarten is an informal reference to a group of Britons who served in the South African Civil Service under High Commissioner Alfred, Lord Milner, between the Second Boer War and the founding of the Union of South Africa.

Orange River Colony

Orange Rivera British colonycolony
The work of reconstructing the civil administration in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony could only be carried on to a limited extent while operations continued in the field.
On the British side, Sir Alfred Milner was appointed Administrator of the Orange River Colony on 4 January 1901, with Hamilton John Goold-Adams as lieutenant-governor.

Henry Birchenough

Birchenough of MacclesfieldBirchenough ReportJohn Henry Birchenough
At Milner's suggestion the British government sent Henry Birchenough a businessman and old friend of Milners as special trade commissioner to South Africa with the task of preparing a Blue Book on trade prospects in the aftermath of the war.
Birchenough became a close friend of Alfred Milner, the future Lord Milner, and the two shared lodgings in London prior to Birchenough's marriage.

Giessen

GießenGiessen, HesseGiessen, West Germany
Their only son, Alfred Milner, was born in the Hessian town of Giessen and educated first at Tübingen, then at King's College School and, from 1872 to 1876, as a scholar of Balliol College, Oxford, studying under the classicist theologian Benjamin Jowett.
Alfred Milner (1854–1925), British statesman

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
When the Second Boer War broke out in October 1899, Milner rendered the military authorities "unfailing support and wise counsels", being, in Lord Roberts's phrase "one whose courage never faltered".
The Cape Colony Governor, Sir Alfred Milner, Cape Prime Minister Cecil Rhodes, the Colonial Secretary Joseph Chamberlain, and mining syndicate owners (Randlords, nicknamed the gold bugs), such as Alfred Beit, Barney Barnato, and Lionel Phillips favoured annexation of the Boer republics.

Lloyd George ministry

coalition governmentCoalitionCoalition Liberal
Since Milner was the Briton who had the most experience in civil direction of a war, Lloyd George turned to him in December 1916 when he formed his national government.
Lord Milner – Minister without Portfolio

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
The situation resulting from the Jameson raid was one of the greatest delicacy and difficulty, and Joseph Chamberlain, now colonial secretary, selected Milner as Lord Rosmead's successor.
The government appointed Sir Alfred Milner to the posts of High Commissioner and Governor-General of the Cape in August 1897 to pursue the issue more decisively.

War cabinet

British War CabinetWar Cabinet OfficeAustralian War Cabinet
He was made a member of the five-person War Cabinet.
Lord Milner (December 1916 – April 1918)

Cape Colony

Cape of Good HopeCapeGovernor of the Cape of Good Hope
In April, Lord Rosmead resigned his posts of High Commissioner for Southern Africa and Governor of Cape Colony.
Sir Alfred Milner (1897–1901)

Arnold Toynbee

another notable historianToynbeeToynbee, Arnold
At Oxford he formed a close friendship with young economic historian Arnold Toynbee, writing a paper in support of his theories of social work and, in 1895, twelve years after his death at the age of 30, penning a tribute, Arnold Toynbee: a Reminiscence.
Early chairs of trustees included Philip Lyttelton Gell and Lord Alfred Milner.

The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs

The Round TableRound TableRound Table Journal
In 1910 he became a founder of The Round Table – A Quarterly Review of the Politics of the British Empire, which helped to promote the cause of imperial federation.
It was founded by Lord Milner, former High Commissioner of South Africa, and three others, who were associated with Milner through their work in the South African Civil Service:

Rio Tinto (corporation)

Rio TintoRio Tinto Iron OreRio Tinto Zinc
Upon his return from South Africa, Milner occupied himself mainly with business interests in London, becoming chairman of the Rio Tinto Zinc mining company, though he remained active in the campaign for imperial free trade.
However, this changed in 1925, when Sir Auckland Geddes succeeded Lord Alfred Milner as chairman.

Sir Henry Wilson, 1st Baronet

Henry WilsonSir Henry WilsonHenry Hughes Wilson
In January 1917 Milner led the British delegation (with Henry Wilson as chief military representative and including a banker and two munitions experts) on the mission to Russia.
When tensions mounted again in the summer of 1899, and Sir Alfred Milner was demanding that 10,000 British troops be sent, Wilson wrote (6 July) that 40,000 troops should be sent (in the event 448,000 white troops and 45,000 Africans would be mobilised to fight 87,000 Boers).

Orange Free State

Free StateOrange Free State RepublicRepublic of the Orange Free State
The appointment was avowedly made in order that an acceptable British statesman, in whom public confidence was reposed, might go to South Africa to consider all the circumstances and to formulate a policy which should combine the upholding of British interests with the attempt to deal justly with the Transvaal and Orange Free State governments.
In May 1899 President Steyn suggested the conference at Bloemfontein between President Kruger and Sir Alfred Milner, but this act was too late.

William Schreiner

W.P. SchreinerW P SchreinerW. P. Schreiner
In October 1898, acting strictly in a constitutional manner, Milner called upon William Philip Schreiner to form a ministry, though aware that such a ministry would be opposed to any direct intervention of Great Britain in the Transvaal.
As prime minister Schreiner favoured negotiation rather than hostilities, to the chagrin of the governor and high commissioner, Alfred Milner, who was actively fomenting war.