Alfred Rahlfs

The Gutenberg Bible, the first printed Bible (mid-15th century)

German Biblical scholar.

- Alfred Rahlfs
The Gutenberg Bible, the first printed Bible (mid-15th century)

4 related topics

Alpha

Fragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation

Septuagint

Earliest extant Greek translation of books from the Hebrew Bible.

Earliest extant Greek translation of books from the Hebrew Bible.

Fragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation
Beginning of the Letter of Aristeas to Philocrates (Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 11th century)
The inter-relationship between significant ancient Old Testament manuscripts (some identified by their siglum). LXX denotes the original Septuagint.

801, 819, and 957) and 1st-century-BCE fragments of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, and the Twelve Minor Prophets (Alfred Rahlfs nos.

1935 original edition of the 2 volumes of Alfred Rahlfs' edition of the Septuagint

Alfred Rahlfs' edition of the Septuagint

1935 original edition of the 2 volumes of Alfred Rahlfs' edition of the Septuagint

Alfred Rahlfs' edition of the Septuagint, sometimes called Rahlfs' Septuagint or Rahlfs' Septuaginta, is a critical edition of the Septuagint published for the first time in 1935 by the German philologist Alfred Rahlfs.

Rudolf Smend

Rudolf Smend

German theologian born in Lengerich, Westphalia.

German theologian born in Lengerich, Westphalia.

Rudolf Smend

In 1907 with Alfred Rahlfs (1865–1935) he created the Septuaginta-Unternehmen (Septuagint Venture) in the Göttingen Society of Sciences.

Door of the Theses in Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

History of religions school

Term applied to a group of German Protestant theologians associated with the University of Göttingen in the 1890s.

Term applied to a group of German Protestant theologians associated with the University of Göttingen in the 1890s.

Door of the Theses in Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

The circle included Bernhard Duhm (1873), Albert Eichhorn (1856–1926; 1886), Hermann Gunkel (1888), Johannes Weiss (1888), Wilhelm Bousset (1890), Alfred Rahlfs (1891), Ernst Troeltsch (1891), William Wrede (1891), Heinrich Hackmann (1893), and later Rudolf Otto (1898), Hugo Gressmann (1902) and Wilhelm Heitmüller (1902).