A report on Algeria

Roman ruins at Djémila
Ancient Roman ruins of Timgad on the street leading to the local Arch of Trajan
Masinissa (c. 238–148 BC), first king of Numidia
The lands which comprise modern day Algeria were part of the Byzantine Empire (The empire in 555 under Justinian the Great, at its greatest extent since the fall of the Western Roman Empire (vassals in pink))
Mansourah mosque, Tlemcen
Dihya memorial in Khenchela, Algeria
Fatimid Caliphate, a Shia Ismaili dynasty that ruled much of North Africa, c. 960–1100
Lands ruled by the Ifrenid dynasty of Tlemcen (Current day Algeria) Partially based on the book of Ibn Khaldun: The History of the Berbers
Map showing territories that were controlled by the Zirid Dynasty
Territories controlled by the Maghrawa
The Zayyanid Kingdom of Tlemcen during the rule of Abu Malek
The Zayyanid kingdom of Tlemcen in the fifteenth century and its neighbors
Hayreddin Barbarossa
Bombardment of Algiers by the Anglo-Dutch fleet, to support the ultimatum to release European slaves, August 1816
Kabyle Kingdoms at their height
Christian slaves in Algiers, 1706
The estimated extent of the Regency of Algiers in 1792 after taking possession of the Rif and Oujda
Battle of Somah in 1836
Emir Abdelkader, Algerian leader insurgent against French colonial rule, 1865
The six historical Leaders of the FLN: Rabah Bitat, Mostefa Ben Boulaïd, Didouche Mourad, Mohammed Boudiaf, Krim Belkacem and Larbi Ben M'Hidi.
Houari Boumediene
Massacres of over 50 people in 1997–1998. The Armed Islamic Group (GIA) claimed responsibility for many of them.
The Sahara, the Hoggar Mountains and the Atlas Mountains compose the Algerian relief.
The Algerian Desert makes up more than 90% of the country's total area.
Algeria map of Köppen climate classification.
The fennec fox is the national animal of Algeria
Abdelmadjid Tebboune, President of Algeria since 2019
The People's National Assembly
President Abdelaziz Bouteflika and George W. Bush exchange handshakes at the Windsor Hotel Toya Resort and Spa in Tōyako Town, Abuta District, Hokkaidō in 2008. With them are Dmitriy Medvedev, left, and Yasuo Fukuda, right.
A Djebel Chenoua-class corvette, designed and assembled in Algeria
GDP per capita development in Algeria
A proportional representation of Algeria exports, 2019
Pipelines across Algeria
Djanet
The main highway connecting the Moroccan to the Tunisian border was a part of the Cairo–Dakar Highway project
Some of Algeria's traditional clothes
Signs in the University of Tizi Ouzou in three languages: Arabic, Berber, and French
Hassan Pasha Mosque in Oran
UIS literacy rate Algeria population plus 15 1985–2015
Algerian musicians in Tlemcen, Ottoman Algeria; by Bachir Yellès
Mohammed Racim; founder of the Algerian school for painting
Ahlam Mosteghanemi, the most widely read female writer in the Arab world.
El Hadj M'Hamed El Anka
Mohammed Lakhdar-Hamina, one of the most prominent figures in contemporary Arabic cinema.
A Bulgur-based salad
The Algeria national football team

Country in North Africa.

- Algeria

241 related topics with Alpha

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Arab Maghreb Union

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Political union and economic union trade agreement aiming for economic and future political unity among Arab countries States that are located primarily in the Maghreb in North Africa.

Political union and economic union trade agreement aiming for economic and future political unity among Arab countries States that are located primarily in the Maghreb in North Africa.

Its members are the nations of Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia.

The Russian made Rais Korfou frigate

Algerian People's National Army

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The Russian made Rais Korfou frigate

The Algerian People's National Army (الجيش الوطني الشعبي الجزائري; Armée nationale populaire) is the military force of the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria.

Bilingual French-Arabic sign in Algiers.

French language in Algeria

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Bilingual French-Arabic sign in Algiers.

French is a lingua franca of Algeria according to the CIA World Factbook.

2005 Algerian national reconciliation referendum

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The 2005 Algerian national reconciliation referendum took place in Algeria on 29 September 2005.

The Kingdom of Altava (1) and other romanized berber kingdoms of the late sixth century.

Kingdom of Altava

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The Kingdom of Altava (1) and other romanized berber kingdoms of the late sixth century.
Map of the Mauro-Roman Kingdom prior to its collapse in the sixth century.
King Caecilius of Altava.

The Kingdom of Altava was an independent Berber kingdom centered on the city of Altava in present-day northern Algeria.

Tipasa

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Actual ruins of Roman Tipasa
Christian tomb from a Roman Tipasa basilica
View of Tipasa, Algeria
Roman ruins of Tipasa (basilica)
Vestiges of the Christian church
Roman ruins of Tipasa
View of Tipasa, Algeria
Panoramic view of Tipasa
Tomb of Juba II and Cleopatra Selene II
view showing base of walls

Tipasa, sometimes distinguished as Tipasa in Mauretania, was a colonia in the Roman province Mauretania Caesariensis, nowadays called Tipaza, and located in coastal central Algeria.

Abu Zayd al-Hilali (right) chopping off the head of Hegazi ibn Rafe'

Sirat Bani Hilal

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Arabic epic

Arabic epic

Abu Zayd al-Hilali (right) chopping off the head of Hegazi ibn Rafe'
Egyptian engraving
Dhiab bin Ghanim against Zanati Khalifa

that recounts the tale of the journey of the Bedouin tribe of the Banu Hilal from Najd in Arabia to Tunisia and Algeria via Egypt.

Clockwise from the upper left corner:
Protesters gathered at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, 9 February 2011;
Habib Bourguiba Boulevard, protesters in Tunis, Tunisia, 14 January 2011;
dissidents in Sanaa, Yemen, calling for president Ali Abdullah Saleh to resign on 3 February 2011;
crowds of hundreds of thousands in Baniyas, Syria, 29 April 2011

Arab Spring

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Series of anti-government protests, uprisings, and armed rebellions that spread across much of the Arab world in the early 2010s.

Series of anti-government protests, uprisings, and armed rebellions that spread across much of the Arab world in the early 2010s.

Clockwise from the upper left corner:
Protesters gathered at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, 9 February 2011;
Habib Bourguiba Boulevard, protesters in Tunis, Tunisia, 14 January 2011;
dissidents in Sanaa, Yemen, calling for president Ali Abdullah Saleh to resign on 3 February 2011;
crowds of hundreds of thousands in Baniyas, Syria, 29 April 2011
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Over 100,000 Bahrainis taking part in the "March of Loyalty to Martyrs" in Manama honoring political dissidents killed by security forces
Celebrations in Tahrir Square after Omar Suleiman's statement concerning Hosni Mubarak's resignation
Thousands of demonstrators gather in Bayda.
Anti-government demonstrations in Baniyas
Protesters on Avenue Habib Bourguiba, downtown Tunis on 14 January 2011, a few hours before president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country
Protestors in Aden calling for reinstatement of South Yemen during Arab Spring.
Protests in Sana'a
Areas of control in the Libyan Civil War (2014–present)
Demonstrators holding the Rabia sign in solidarity with the victims of the August 2013 Rabaa massacre of pro-Morsi sit-ins in Cairo
Yemeni capital Sanaa after Saudi Arabian-led airstrikes against the Shia Houthis, October 2015

Sustained street demonstrations took place in Morocco, Iraq, Algeria, Iranian Khuzestan, Lebanon, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, and Sudan.

French colonial empire

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The French colonial empire (Empire colonial français) comprised the overseas colonies, protectorates and mandate territories that came under French rule from the 16th century onward.

The French colonial empire (Empire colonial français) comprised the overseas colonies, protectorates and mandate territories that came under French rule from the 16th century onward.

French colonial empire 17th century-20th century
Map of the first (green) and second (blue) French colonial empires
The French colonial empire in the Americas comprised New France (including Canada and Louisiana), French West Indies (including Saint-Domingue, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Dominica, St. Lucia, Grenada, Tobago and other islands) and French Guiana.
French North America was known as 'Nouvelle France' or New France.
1767 Louis XV Colonies Françoises (West Indies) 12 Diniers copper Sous (w/1793 "RF" counterstamp)
Arrival of Marshal Randon in Algiers in 1857 by Ernest Francis Vacherot
French and other European settlements in Colonial India
The British invasion of Martinique in 1809
Animated map showing the growth and decline of the first and second French colonial empires
Queen Pōmare IV in 1860. Tahiti was made a French protectorate in 1842, and annexed as a colony of France in 1880.
The last photograph of Napoleon III (1872)
French trading post on Gorée, an island offshore of Senegal
The French expedition in Syria led by General Beaufort d'Hautpoul, landing in Beyrouth on 16 August 1860
The French conquest of Algeria
The Presidential Palace of Vietnam, in Hanoi, was built between 1900 and 1906 to house the French Governor-General of Indochina.
Central and east Africa, 1898, during the Fashoda Incident
The captured rebels of Raiatea, 1897
Comparison of Africa in the years 1880 and 1913
French colonial troops, led by Colonel Alfred-Amédée Dodds, a Senegalese mulatto, conquered and annexed Dahomey in 1894.
The gradual loss of all Vichy territory to Free France and the Allies by 1943. [[:File:Vichy france map.png|Legend.]]
Captured French soldiers from Dien Bien Phu, escorted by Vietnamese troops, walk to a prisoner-of-war camp
Capture of Saigon by Charles Rigault de Genouilly on 18 February 1859, painted by Antoine Morel-Fatio
Napoleon III receiving the Siamese embassy at the palace of Fontainebleau in 1864
Map of the first (green) and second (blue) French colonial empires

This expedition operated jointly with two other expeditions, the Foureau-Lamy and Gentil Missions, which advanced from Algeria and Middle Congo respectively.

Houari Boumédiène

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The house where Boumediene was born in douar beni aadi
Boumediène during the Algerian War of Independence
thumb|The 1975 Algiers Agreement was signed by (left to right) the Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, Boumédiène, and the Iraqi vice-president Saddam Hussein
thumb|upright|Boumédiène in 1972
Boumediene with Ahmed Ben Bella in 1962.
Houari Boumediene standing in a row with the other politicians., 1965.
Boumediene with Cuban communist leader Fidel Castro in 1972.
alt=|Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, Boumediene and Syrian President Hafez al-Assad in Tripoli, 1977

Houari Boumédiène (هواري بومدين ; ALA-LC: Hawwārī Būmadyan; born Mohammed Ben Brahim Boukherouba; 23 August 1932 – 27 December 1978) was an Algerian Nationalist, politician and army colonel who served as Chairman of the Revolutionary Council of Algeria from 19 June 1965 until 12 December 1976 and thereafter as the second President of Algeria until his death in 1978.