A report on Algeria

Roman ruins at Djémila
Ancient Roman ruins of Timgad on the street leading to the local Arch of Trajan
Masinissa (c. 238–148 BC), first king of Numidia
The lands which comprise modern day Algeria were part of the Byzantine Empire (The empire in 555 under Justinian the Great, at its greatest extent since the fall of the Western Roman Empire (vassals in pink))
Mansourah mosque, Tlemcen
Dihya memorial in Khenchela, Algeria
Fatimid Caliphate, a Shia Ismaili dynasty that ruled much of North Africa, c. 960–1100
Lands ruled by the Ifrenid dynasty of Tlemcen (Current day Algeria) Partially based on the book of Ibn Khaldun: The History of the Berbers
Map showing territories that were controlled by the Zirid Dynasty
Territories controlled by the Maghrawa
The Zayyanid Kingdom of Tlemcen during the rule of Abu Malek
The Zayyanid kingdom of Tlemcen in the fifteenth century and its neighbors
Hayreddin Barbarossa
Bombardment of Algiers by the Anglo-Dutch fleet, to support the ultimatum to release European slaves, August 1816
Kabyle Kingdoms at their height
Christian slaves in Algiers, 1706
The estimated extent of the Regency of Algiers in 1792 after taking possession of the Rif and Oujda
Battle of Somah in 1836
Emir Abdelkader, Algerian leader insurgent against French colonial rule, 1865
The six historical Leaders of the FLN: Rabah Bitat, Mostefa Ben Boulaïd, Didouche Mourad, Mohammed Boudiaf, Krim Belkacem and Larbi Ben M'Hidi.
Houari Boumediene
Massacres of over 50 people in 1997–1998. The Armed Islamic Group (GIA) claimed responsibility for many of them.
The Sahara, the Hoggar Mountains and the Atlas Mountains compose the Algerian relief.
The Algerian Desert makes up more than 90% of the country's total area.
Algeria map of Köppen climate classification.
The fennec fox is the national animal of Algeria
Abdelmadjid Tebboune, President of Algeria since 2019
The People's National Assembly
President Abdelaziz Bouteflika and George W. Bush exchange handshakes at the Windsor Hotel Toya Resort and Spa in Tōyako Town, Abuta District, Hokkaidō in 2008. With them are Dmitriy Medvedev, left, and Yasuo Fukuda, right.
A Djebel Chenoua-class corvette, designed and assembled in Algeria
GDP per capita development in Algeria
A proportional representation of Algeria exports, 2019
Pipelines across Algeria
Djanet
The main highway connecting the Moroccan to the Tunisian border was a part of the Cairo–Dakar Highway project
Some of Algeria's traditional clothes
Signs in the University of Tizi Ouzou in three languages: Arabic, Berber, and French
Hassan Pasha Mosque in Oran
UIS literacy rate Algeria population plus 15 1985–2015
Algerian musicians in Tlemcen, Ottoman Algeria; by Bachir Yellès
Mohammed Racim; founder of the Algerian school for painting
Ahlam Mosteghanemi, the most widely read female writer in the Arab world.
El Hadj M'Hamed El Anka
Mohammed Lakhdar-Hamina, one of the most prominent figures in contemporary Arabic cinema.
A Bulgur-based salad
The Algeria national football team

Country in North Africa.

- Algeria

241 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Sand War

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The Maghreb in the second half of the 19th century

The Sand War or the Sands War (حَرْبُ الرِّمَال) was a border conflict between Algeria and Morocco in October 1963.

The Triumph of Saint Augustine painted by Claudio Coello, c. 1664

Augustine of Hippo

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Theologian and philosopher of Berber origin and the bishop of Hippo Regius in Numidia, Roman North Africa.

Theologian and philosopher of Berber origin and the bishop of Hippo Regius in Numidia, Roman North Africa.

The Triumph of Saint Augustine painted by Claudio Coello, c. 1664
The Saint Augustine Taken to School by Saint Monica, by Niccolò di Pietro 1413–15
The earliest known portrait of Saint Augustine in a 6th-century fresco, Lateran, Rome
Saint Augustine and his mother, Saint Monica (1846) by Ary Scheffer
The Conversion of St. Augustine by Fra Angelico
The vision of St. Augustine by Ascanio Luciano
Augustine's arm bones, Saint Augustin Basilica, Annaba, Algeria
St. Augustine by Carlo Crivelli
Painting of Saint Augustine (1458) by Tomás Giner, tempera on panel, Diocesan Museum of Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain
St. Augustine by Peter Paul Rubens
St. Augustine in His Study by Vittore Carpaccio, 1502
Saint Augustine in the Nuremberg Chronicle
Saint Augustine in His Study by Sandro Botticelli, 1494, Uffizi Gallery
Saint Augustine painting by Antonio Rodríguez
Saint Augustine Disputing with the Heretics painting by Vergós Group
The Consecration of Saint Augustine by Jaume Huguet

Hippo Regius, where Augustine was the bishop, was in modern-day Annaba, Algeria.

Judah ibn Kuraish

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Algerian-Jewish grammarian and lexicographer.

Algerian-Jewish grammarian and lexicographer.

He was born at Tiaret in Algeria and flourished in the 9th century.

Possible depiction of Yaghmurasen

Yaghmurasen Ibn Zyan

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The founder of the Zayyanid dynasty.

The founder of the Zayyanid dynasty.

Possible depiction of Yaghmurasen

Under his reign the Zayyanid Kingdom of Tlemcen extended over present-day north-western Algeria.

Kairouan

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Capital of the Kairouan Governorate in Tunisia and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Capital of the Kairouan Governorate in Tunisia and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Aghlabid Basins
Gold coin of the Fatimid Caliph Al-Mahdi Billah, minted in Kairouan in 912 CE
Bab Chouhada Street in 1899
The Great Mosque of Kairouan also known as the Mosque of Uqba (Great Mosque of Sidi-Uqba)
Mosque of the Barber
Kasba Hotel
180px
Trois Portes Mosque
Great Mosque in night
Remparts en flame
Kairouan Center-Ville
Souk of Kairouan
Tunisia Hotel
Piscines des Aghlabides
Salat of Tarawih in Great Mosque

After succeeding in extending their rule over all of central Maghreb, an area consisting of the modern countries of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya, they eventually moved east to Egypt to found Cairo making it the capital of their vast Caliphate and leaving the Zirids as their vassals in Ifriqiya.

Africa

List of African countries by area

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List of all countries in Africa, in order of geographical area.

List of all countries in Africa, in order of geographical area.

Africa

Algeria has been the largest country in Africa and the Arab world since 2011, at the time of the division of Sudan.

Ottoman Empire

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Empire that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries.

Empire that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries.

The Ottoman Empire in 1683
The Ottoman Empire in 1683
The Battle of Nicopolis in 1396, depicted in an Ottoman miniature from 1523
The Ottoman Empire in 1683
Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror's entry into Constantinople; painting by Fausto Zonaro (1854–1929)
An Ottoman miniature of the Battle of Mohács in 1526
Map of Ottoman territorial acquisitions up to 1683
The Second Siege of Vienna in 1683, by Frans Geffels (1624–1694).
Austrian troops led by Prince Eugene of Savoy captured Belgrade in 1717. Austrian control in Serbia lasted until the Turkish victory in the Austro-Russian–Turkish War (1735–1739). With the 1739 Treaty of Belgrade, the Ottoman Empire regained northern Bosnia, Habsburg Serbia (including Belgrade), Oltenia and the southern parts of the Banat of Temeswar.
Ottoman troops attempting to halt the advancing Russians during the Siege of Ochakov in 1788
Selim III receiving dignitaries during an audience at the Gate of Felicity, Topkapı Palace. Painting by Konstantin Kapıdağlı.
The siege of the Acropolis in 1826–1827 during the Greek War of Independence
Opening ceremony of the First Ottoman Parliament at the Dolmabahçe Palace in 1876. The First Constitutional Era lasted only two years until 1878. The Ottoman Constitution and Parliament were restored 30 years later with the Young Turk Revolution in 1908.
Ottoman troops storming Fort Shefketil during the Crimean War of 1853–1856
The Empire in 1875 under sultan Abdul-Aziz
Declaration of the Young Turk Revolution by the leaders of the Ottoman millets in 1908
Admiral Wilhelm Souchon, who commanded the Black Sea Raid on 29 October 1914, and his officers in Ottoman naval uniforms
The Armenian genocide was the result of the Ottoman government's deportation and ethnic cleansing policies regarding its Armenian citizens after the Battle of Sarikamish (1914–1915) and the collapse of the Caucasus Front against the Imperial Russian Army and Armenian volunteer units during World War I. An estimated 600,000 to more than 1 million, or up to 1.5 million people were killed.
Mehmed VI, the last Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, leaving the country after the abolition of the Ottoman sultanate, 17 November 1922
Ambassadors at the Topkapı Palace
Inside Harem, the private residence of the sultan in Topkapı Palace
Yusuf Ziya Pasha, Ottoman ambassador to the United States, in Washington, 1913
An Ottoman trial, 1877
An unhappy wife complains to the Qadi about her husband's impotence as depicted in an Ottoman miniature.
Ottoman sipahis in battle, holding the crescent banner (by Józef Brandt)
Selim III watching the parade of his new army, the Nizam-ı Cedid (New Order) troops, in 1793
A German postcard depicting the Ottoman Navy at the Golden Horn in the early stages of World War I. At top left is a portrait of Sultan Mehmed V.
Ottoman pilots in early 1912
Administrative divisions in 1899 (year 1317 Hijri)
A European bronze medal from the period of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror, 1481
The Ottoman Bank was founded in 1856 in Constantinople. On 26 August 1896, the bank was occupied by members of the Armenian Revolutionary Federation.
Smyrna under Ottoman rule in 1900
View of Galata (Karaköy) and the Galata Bridge on the Golden Horn, c. 1880–1893
1911 Ottoman calendar shown in several different languages such as: Ottoman Turkish, Greek, Armenian, Hebrew, Bulgarian and French.
Abdülmecid II was the last caliph of Islam and a member of the Ottoman dynasty.
Mehmed the Conqueror and Patriarch Gennadius II
The original Church of St. Anthony of Padua, Istanbul was built in 1725 by the local Italian community of Istanbul.
Depiction of a hookah shop in Lebanon, Ottoman Empire
Beyazıt State Library was founded in 1884.
Ahmet Nedîm Efendi, one of the most celebrated Ottoman poets
Süleymaniye Mosque in Istanbul, designed by Sinan in the 16th century and a major example of the Classical Ottoman style
Ottoman miniature lost its function with the Westernization of Ottoman culture.
Turkish women baking bread, 1790
Observatory of Taqi ad-Din in 1577
Girl Reciting the Qurān (Kuran Okuyan Kız), an 1880 painting by the Ottoman polymath Osman Hamdi Bey, whose works often showed women engaged in educational activities.
Members of Beşiktaş J.K. in 1903
Members of Galatasaray S.K. (football) in 1905
Miniature from Surname-i Vehbi showing the Mehteran, the music band of the Janissaries
The shadow play Karagöz and Hacivat was widespread throughout the Ottoman Empire.
Musicians and dancers entertain the crowds, from Surname-i Hümayun, 1720.
A Musical Gathering - 18th century
Acrobacy in Surname-i Hümayun
Dome of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne.
The original Church of St. Anthony of Padua, Istanbul was built in 1725 by the local Italian community of Istanbul.

It initiated the conquest of North Africa, with the addition of Algeria and Egypt to the Ottoman Empire in 1517.

Oujda

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Ancien mirador
Oujda Church
Oujda, Bd Mohamed V

Oujda (وجدة; ) is a major Moroccan city in its northeast near the border with Algeria.

Mostaganem

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Sidi Lakhdar beach.
El Arsa

Mostaganem (مستغانم) is a port city in and capital of Mostaganem province, in the northwest of Algeria.

Meknes

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One of the four Imperial cities of Morocco, located in northern central Morocco and the sixth largest city by population in the kingdom.

One of the four Imperial cities of Morocco, located in northern central Morocco and the sixth largest city by population in the kingdom.

Skyline of the old city (medina) of Meknes
The Mausoleum of Moulay Isma'il
View of Bab Berda'in gate and the minaret of the Bab Barda'in Mosque (photograph from 1881)
A main street in the Ville Nouvelle (new city)
Aerial view of the northern part of the old medina of Meknes, near Bab Berda'in
Crowds gathering in el-Hedim Square at the end of the day
Map of the Kasbah of Moulay Ismail in relation to the medina (old city), with its major areas indicated
A traditional market street in the center of the medina (old city)
This image shows the geographical structure of the Saïss plain around Meknes area in Morocco.
Meknès Ville train station
View into the courtyard (sahn) of the Grand Mosque of Meknes
The Bou Inania Madrasa
Nejjarine Mosque
Minaret of the Lalla Aouda Mosque
Bab Berda'in Mosque (pictured after 2010)
Zawiya of Sidi Mohammed Ben Aissa
Zawiya of Sidi Kaddour el-Alami (view of the minaret and outer wall)
Bab Mansour al-'Alj
Bab Jama' an-Nouar
Bab ad-Dar al-Kebira
Bab el-Khemis
Bab Berda'in
Borj Belkari
Place Lalla Aouda
Vaulted passage in the palace ruins of the Dar el-Kebira neighbourhood
The Mausoleum complex of Moulay Isma'il
The Qubbat al-Khayyatin
The Qara "Prison"
Ornate gate of the Dar al-Makhzen in Meknes
The Sahrij or Agdal Basin
Arches of the Heri as-Swani silos
Entrance to the Meknes Museum
Room in the Dar Jamai Museum
Ruins of Roman Volubilis
The town of Moulay Idriss Zerhoun

The threat of Ottoman attacks from the east (from Algeria) and the increasing insecurity in central Morocco due to tribal migrations from the Atlas and Sahara regions may have also persuaded Ismail that Meknes, situated further west, was more defensible than Fes.