Algolagnia

algolagnic disorder
Algolagnia (from ἄλγος, álgos, "pain", and λαγνεία, lagneía, "lust") is a sexual tendency which is defined by deriving sexual pleasure and stimulation from physical pain, often involving an erogenous zone.wikipedia
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Sadomasochism

S&Msadisticsadomasochistic
(It should be cautioned, though, that the definitions regarding sadism and masochism as medical terms have changed over the years (as also noted in the main article for that topic) and are still evolving, and there are also non-medical definitions of sadomasochism.) However, Krafft-Ebing's theories in Psychopathia Sexualis – where the terms sadism and masochism were used – were adopted by Sigmund Freud and became an integral part of psychoanalysis, thereby ensuring their predominance over the concept of "algolagnia".

BDSM

sadomasochisticsado-masochismsado-masochistic
And using algolagnia as both a pathological and non-pathological term, some in the modern research community still link it to some but not all BDSM activities.
This experience of algolagnia is important, but is not the only motivation for many BDSM practitioners.

Sexual masochism disorder

masochismmasochisticsexual masochism
694). It is classified as one of the paraphilias, called an algolagnic disorder (p.

Autosadism

It can be viewed as a form of masochism, a sublimated form of sadism, or a means to experiencing algolagnia, a sexual tendency which is defined by deriving sexual pleasure and stimulation from physical pain.

Sexual stimulation

sexual pleasuresexually stimulatederotic pleasure
Algolagnia (from ἄλγος, álgos, "pain", and λαγνεία, lagneía, "lust") is a sexual tendency which is defined by deriving sexual pleasure and stimulation from physical pain, often involving an erogenous zone.

Pain

physical painacute painnociceptive pain
Algolagnia (from ἄλγος, álgos, "pain", and λαγνεία, lagneía, "lust") is a sexual tendency which is defined by deriving sexual pleasure and stimulation from physical pain, often involving an erogenous zone.

Erogenous zone

erogenous zoneserogenousErogenic Zones
Algolagnia (from ἄλγος, álgos, "pain", and λαγνεία, lagneía, "lust") is a sexual tendency which is defined by deriving sexual pleasure and stimulation from physical pain, often involving an erogenous zone.

Charles Féré

Charles Samson FéréFéré
In 1892, Albert von Schrenck-Notzing introduced the term algolagnia to describe "sexual" masochism, to differentiate it from Charles Féré's earlier term called "algophilia"; Schrenck-Notzing's interpretation was that algolagnia involved lust, not love as Fere interpreted the phenomenon.

Lust

lustfullecherousdebauchery
In 1892, Albert von Schrenck-Notzing introduced the term algolagnia to describe "sexual" masochism, to differentiate it from Charles Féré's earlier term called "algophilia"; Schrenck-Notzing's interpretation was that algolagnia involved lust, not love as Fere interpreted the phenomenon.

Psychopathia Sexualis

Psycopathia Sexuallis
(It should be cautioned, though, that the definitions regarding sadism and masochism as medical terms have changed over the years (as also noted in the main article for that topic) and are still evolving, and there are also non-medical definitions of sadomasochism.) However, Krafft-Ebing's theories in Psychopathia Sexualis – where the terms sadism and masochism were used – were adopted by Sigmund Freud and became an integral part of psychoanalysis, thereby ensuring their predominance over the concept of "algolagnia".

Havelock Ellis

Henry Havelock EllisEllis, Havelockeonism
Soon thereafter, Havelock Ellis also looked into algolagnia, in the early 1900s, and stated "Sadism and Masochism – Algolagnia Includes Both Groups of Manifestations" but maintained that that enjoyment of pain was restricted to an erotic context, in contrast to Krafft-Ebing's interpretations.

Eugen Kahn

Eugen Kahn, Smith Ely Jelliffe, William Alanson White, and Hugh Northcote were other early psychological researchers into algolagnia.

Smith Ely Jelliffe

Eugen Kahn, Smith Ely Jelliffe, William Alanson White, and Hugh Northcote were other early psychological researchers into algolagnia.

William Alanson White

Eugen Kahn, Smith Ely Jelliffe, William Alanson White, and Hugh Northcote were other early psychological researchers into algolagnia.

Hugh Northcote

Eugen Kahn, Smith Ely Jelliffe, William Alanson White, and Hugh Northcote were other early psychological researchers into algolagnia.

Sexual intercourse

sexcopulationintercourse
Patients with algolagnia could lead normal lives, enjoy normal arousal sequences, and indulge in fairly normal sexual intercourse, but when exposed to sexual pain, were unable to control their reaction.

Hypersexuality

nymphomaniachypersexualsatyriasis
This and other research have linked algolagnia to aggression, hypersexuality, or other control psychoses.

Computer simulation

computer modelsimulationcomputer modeling
Research using MRI and computer models of neuron firing patterns has shown that most algolagniacs experience pain differently from others.

Nav1.7

Na v 1.7SCN9ANav1.7. channel
Algolagniacs may have DNA errors such as SCN9A, causing inaccurate nociception to occur.

Nociception

nociceptiveantinociceptivepain perception
Algolagniacs may have DNA errors such as SCN9A, causing inaccurate nociception to occur.

Albert von Schrenck-Notzing

Albert Freiherr von Schrenck-NotzingBaron von Schrenck-NotzingLadislas Lasslo
In 1892, Albert von Schrenck-Notzing introduced the term algolagnia to describe "sexual" masochism, to differentiate it from Charles Féré's earlier term called "algophilia"; Schrenck-Notzing's interpretation was that algolagnia involved lust, not love as Fere interpreted the phenomenon. At least one researcher in the 1900s, Albert Freiherr von Schrenck-Notzing, who was a self-professed sadist, thought that algolagnia was a psychological disorder.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
At least one researcher in the 1900s, Albert Freiherr von Schrenck-Notzing, who was a self-professed sadist, thought that algolagnia was a psychological disorder.

Kinsey Reports

Kinsey ReportSexual Behavior in the Human MaleSexual Behavior in the Human Female
This view began to change once the Kinsey Reports noted that many seemingly normal people often enjoy pain in a sexual context, and later Norman Breslow found that, before 1977, only four previous studies in all the scientific literature were empirical in nature.

Norman Breslow

Breslow, NormanNorman E. BreslowNorman Edward Breslow
This view began to change once the Kinsey Reports noted that many seemingly normal people often enjoy pain in a sexual context, and later Norman Breslow found that, before 1977, only four previous studies in all the scientific literature were empirical in nature.

Empirical evidence

empiricala posterioriempirical data
This view began to change once the Kinsey Reports noted that many seemingly normal people often enjoy pain in a sexual context, and later Norman Breslow found that, before 1977, only four previous studies in all the scientific literature were empirical in nature.