Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquinAlgonquian language familyAlgonquian-speakingAlgonkianAlgonquian familyAlgonquian speakingAlgonquin languageAlgonquin language family
The Algonquian languages ( or ; also Algonkian) are a subfamily of American indigenous languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family.wikipedia
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Algonquin language

AlgonquinAlgonquianAlgonquian language
The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the indigenous Ojibwe language (Chippewa), which is a senior member of the Algonquian language family.
Algonquin (also spelled Algonkin; in Algonquin: Anicinàbemowin or Anishinàbemiwin) is either a distinct Algonquian language closely related to the Ojibwe language or a particularly divergent Ojibwe dialect.

Ojibwe language

OjibweOjibwaAnishinaabe language
The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the indigenous Ojibwe language (Chippewa), which is a senior member of the Algonquian language family.
Ojibwe, also known as Ojibwa, Ojibway or Otchipwe, is an indigenous language of North America of the Algonquian language family.

Maliseet

WolastoqiyikMaleciteMaliseet people
The term Algonquin has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet word elakómkwik, "they are our relatives/allies".
The Wəlastəkwewiyik, or Maliseet (, also spelled Malecite), are an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the Wabanaki Confederacy.

Algic languages

AlgicAlgic language familyAlgic family
also Algonkian) are a subfamily of American indigenous languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family.
Most Algic languages belong to the Algonquian subfamily, dispersed over a broad area from the Rocky Mountains to Atlantic Canada.

Algonquian peoples

AlgonquianAlgonquinAlgonquians
Speakers of Algonquian languages stretch from the east coast of North America to the Rocky Mountains.
This grouping consists of the peoples who speak Algonquian languages.

Proto-Algonquian language

Proto-AlgonquianPA
The proto-language from which all of the languages of the family descend, Proto-Algonquian, was spoken around 2,500 to 3,000 years ago.
Proto-Algonquian (commonly abbreviated PA) is the proto-language from which the various Algonquian languages are descended.

Central Algonquian languages

CentralCentral AlgonquianAlgonquian (Central) language group
This subfamily of around 30 languages is divided into three groups according to geography: Plains, Central, and Eastern Algonquian; of these three, only Eastern Algonquian constitutes a true genetic subgroup.
The Central Algonquian languages are commonly grouped together as a subgroup of the larger Algonquian family, itself a member of the Algic family.

Rocky Mountains

RockiesRocky MountainRocky Mountain Region
Speakers of Algonquian languages stretch from the east coast of North America to the Rocky Mountains.
The name of the mountains is a translation of an Amerindian name that is closely related to Algonquian; the Cree name is given as, "When seen from across the prairies, they looked like a rocky mass".

Plains Algonquian languages

Plains AlgonquianPlainsAlgonquian family
This subfamily of around 30 languages is divided into three groups according to geography: Plains, Central, and Eastern Algonquian; of these three, only Eastern Algonquian constitutes a true genetic subgroup.
The Plains Algonquian languages are commonly grouped together as a subgroup of the larger Algonquian family, itself a member of the Algic family.

Eastern Algonquian languages

Eastern AlgonquianAlgonquianEastern Algonquian language
This subfamily of around 30 languages is divided into three groups according to geography: Plains, Central, and Eastern Algonquian; of these three, only Eastern Algonquian constitutes a true genetic subgroup.
The Eastern Algonquian languages constitute a subgroup of the Algonquian languages.

Blackfoot language

BlackfootblaBlackfeet
The Blackfoot language, also called Siksiká (ᓱᖽᐧᖿ, its denomination in ISO 639-3), (Siksiká [siksiká], syllabics ᓱᖽᐧᖿ), often anglicised as Siksika, is an Algonquian language spoken by the Blackfoot or Niitsitapi people, who currently live in the northwestern plains of North America.

Nawathinehena language

Nawathinehenanwa
Nawathinehena is an extinct Algonquian language formerly spoken among the Arapaho people.

Menominee language

MenomineeMenominiMenomonee
Ex: (Menominee) paehtāwāēwesew "He is heard by higher powers" (paeht- 'hear', -āwāē- 'spirit', -wese- passivizer, -w third-person subject) or (Plains Cree) kāstāhikoyahk "it frightens us".
Menominee (also spelled Menomini) is an Algonquian language spoken by the historic Menominee people of what is now northern Wisconsin in the United States.

Cree language

Creelanguagecre
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.

Potawatomi language

PotawatomipotPotawatomi word
Potawatomi (, also spelled Pottawatomie; in Potawatomi Bodéwadmimwen, or Bodéwadmi Zheshmowen, or Neshnabémwen) is a Central Algonquian language.

Fox language

FoxKickapooKickapoo language
Fox (known by a variety of different names, including Mesquakie (Meskwaki), Mesquakie-Sauk, Mesquakie-Sauk-Kickapoo, Sauk-Fox, and Sac and Fox) is an Algonquian language, spoken by a thousand Meskwaki, Sauk, and Kickapoo in various locations in the Midwestern United States and in northern Mexico.

Shawnee language

ShawneeShawnee wordsShawnee-language
The Shawnee language is a Central Algonquian language spoken in parts of central and northeastern Oklahoma by the Shawnee people.

Miami-Illinois language

Miami-IllinoisMiamiIllinois
Miami-Illinois (Myaamia ) is an indigenous Algonquian language formerly spoken in the United States, primarily in Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, western Ohio and adjacent areas along the Mississippi River by the Miami and Wea as well as the tribes of the Illinois Confederation, including the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Tamaroa, and Mitchigamea.

Abenaki language

AbenakiEastern AbenakiWestern Abenaki
Abenaki, or Abnaki, is an endangered Algonquian language of Quebec and the northern states of New England.

Arapahoan languages

ArapahoanArapahoan language (Arapaho-Atsina)
The Arapahoan languages are a subgroup of the Plains group of Algonquian languages: Nawathinehena, Arapaho, and Gros Ventre.

Malecite-Passamaquoddy language

Malecite-PassamaquoddyMaliseetMalecite
Malecite–Passamaquoddy (also known as Maliseet–Passamaquoddy) is an endangered Algonquian language spoken by the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy peoples along both sides of the border between Maine in the United States and New Brunswick, Canada.

Massachusett language

WampanoagMassachusettWampanoag language
The Massachusett language is an Algonquian language of the Algic language family, formerly spoken by several peoples of eastern coastal and southeastern Massachusetts.

Narragansett language

Narragansettlanguage of the Narragansettxnt
Narragansett is an Algonquian language formerly spoken in most of what is today Rhode Island by the Narragansett people.

Quiripi language

QuiripiQuiripi-Naugatuck-UnquachogUnquachog
Quiripi (pronounced, also known as Quiripi-Unquachog, Quiripi-Naugatuck, and Wampano) was an Algonquian language formerly spoken by the indigenous people of southwestern Connecticut and central Long Island, including the Quinnipiac, Unquachog, Mattabesic, Podunk, Tunxis, and Paugussett (subgroups Naugatuck, Potatuck, Weantinock).