Algonquian peoples

AlgonquianAlgonquinAlgonquiansAlgonquian peopleAlgonkianAlgonquinsAlgonquian groupsAlongkian Indians.AlgonkiansAlgonkin
The Algonquian are one of the most populous and widespread North American native language groups.wikipedia
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Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
This grouping consists of the peoples who speak Algonquian languages.
Speakers of Algonquian languages stretch from the east coast of North America to the Rocky Mountains.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
The Algonquians of New England (who spoke Eastern Algonquian) practiced a seasonal economy. At the time of the first European settlements in North America, Algonquian peoples occupied what is now New Brunswick, and much of what is now Canada east of the Rocky Mountains; what is now New England, New Jersey, southeastern New York, Delaware and down the Atlantic Coast through the Upper South; and around the Great Lakes in present-day Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa.
Over the next 126 years, people in the region fought in four French and Indian Wars, until the English colonists and their Iroquois allies defeated the French and their Algonquian allies in America.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
At the time of the first European settlements in North America, Algonquian peoples occupied what is now New Brunswick, and much of what is now Canada east of the Rocky Mountains; what is now New England, New Jersey, southeastern New York, Delaware and down the Atlantic Coast through the Upper South; and around the Great Lakes in present-day Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa.
New York had been inhabited by tribes of Algonquian and Iroquoian-speaking Native Americans for several hundred years by the time the earliest Europeans came to New York.

Michigan

MIState of MichiganMich.
At the time of the first European settlements in North America, Algonquian peoples occupied what is now New Brunswick, and much of what is now Canada east of the Rocky Mountains; what is now New England, New Jersey, southeastern New York, Delaware and down the Atlantic Coast through the Upper South; and around the Great Lakes in present-day Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa.
When the first European explorers arrived, the most populous tribes were Algonquian peoples, which include the Anishinaabe groups of Ojibwe (referred to as "Chippewa" in the United States), Odaawaa/Odawa (Ottawa), and the Boodewaadamii/Bodéwadmi (Potawatomi).

Delaware

DEState of DelawareGeography of Delaware
At the time of the first European settlements in North America, Algonquian peoples occupied what is now New Brunswick, and much of what is now Canada east of the Rocky Mountains; what is now New England, New Jersey, southeastern New York, Delaware and down the Atlantic Coast through the Upper South; and around the Great Lakes in present-day Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa.
Before Delaware was settled by European colonists, the area was home to the Eastern Algonquian tribes known as the Unami Lenape, or Delaware, who lived mostly along the coast, and the Nanticoke who occupied much of the southern Delmarva Peninsula.

Nipmuc

NipmuckNipmucsNipmuc people
Colonists in the Massachusetts Bay area first encountered the Wampanoag, Massachusett, Nipmuck, Pennacook, Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, and Quinnipiac.
The Nipmuc or Nipmuck people are descendants of the indigenous Algonquian peoples of Nippenet, 'the freshwater pond place', which corresponds to central Massachusetts and immediately adjacent portions of Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Iroquois

Iroquois ConfederacyHaudenosauneeSix Nations
At the time of the European arrival, the hegemonic Iroquois Confederacy, based in present-day New York and Pennsylvania, was regularly at war with Algonquian neighbours.
They brought the Peacemaker's message, known as the Great Law of Peace, to the squabbling Iroquoian nations, who were fighting, raiding and feuding with one another and other tribes, both Algonkian and Iroquoian.

The Maritimes

MaritimesMaritime ProvincesCanadian Maritimes
The French and later English encountered the Maliseet of present-day Maine, Quebec and New Brunswick; the Abenaki of Quebec, Vermont and New Hampshire; the Mi'kmaw band governments of the Maritimes lived primarily on fishing.
The Late Period extended from 3,000 years ago until first contact with European settlers and was dominated by the organization of First Nations peoples into the Algonquian-influenced Abenaki Nation which existed largely in present-day interior Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, and the Mi'kmaq Nation which inhabited all of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, eastern New Brunswick and the southern Gaspé.

Quinnipiac

QuinnipiackQuenepiockeQuinnipiac Tribe
Colonists in the Massachusetts Bay area first encountered the Wampanoag, Massachusett, Nipmuck, Pennacook, Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, and Quinnipiac.
The Quinnipiac is the English name for the Eansketambawg (meaning "original people"; c.f., Ojibwe: Anishinaabeg and Blackfoot: Niitsítapi), a Native American nation of the Algonquian family who inhabited the Wampanoki (i.e., "Dawnland"; c.f., Ojibwe: Waabanaki, Abenaki: Wabanakiyik) region, including present-day Connecticut.

Eastern Algonquian languages

Eastern AlgonquianAlgonquianEastern Algonquian language
The Algonquians of New England (who spoke Eastern Algonquian) practiced a seasonal economy.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
The French and later English encountered the Maliseet of present-day Maine, Quebec and New Brunswick; the Abenaki of Quebec, Vermont and New Hampshire; the Mi'kmaw band governments of the Maritimes lived primarily on fishing.
At the time of first European contact and later colonization, Algonquian, Iroquois and Inuit nations controlled what is now Quebec.

Ojibwe

OjibwaChippewaOjibway
The Ojibwe cultivated wild rice.

Shinnecock Indian Nation

ShinnecockShinnecock IndiansShinnecock tribe
The tribes of Long Island included the Massapequas, the Matinecocks, the Nissequogues, the Setaukets, the Corchaugs, the Secatogues, the Unkechaugs, the Shinnecocks, the Montauketts, and the Manhasets.
The Shinnecock Indian Nation is a federally recognized tribe of historically Algonquian-speaking Native Americans based at the eastern end of Long Island, New York.

Lenape

DelawareLenni LenapeDelaware Indians
The Lenape, also called Delaware, were (Munsee) and Unami speakers that were in what is now known as the eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, lower Hudson Valley and western Long Island areas in New York.
Among many Algonquian peoples along the East Coast, the Lenape were considered the "grandfathers" from whom other Algonquian-speaking peoples originated.

Powhatan

PowhatansPowhatan ConfederacyPowatan
Further south were the traditional homes of the Powhatan, a loose group of bands numbering into the tens of thousands, who were among the first to encounter English colonists in the Chesapeake Bay region.
The Powhatan people (sometimes Powhatans; also spelled Powatan) may refer to any of the Indigenous Algonquian people that are traditionally from eastern Virginia.

Clam

clamsnut clamclam shell
The women and children gathered scallops, mussels, clams and crabs, all the basis of menus in New England today.
Some species of clams, particularly Mercenaria mercenaria, were in the past used by the Algonquians of Eastern North America to manufacture wampum, a type of sacred jewelry; and to make shell money.

Metoac

MatinecockMatinecocksCanarsee Indians
The tribes of Long Island included the Massapequas, the Matinecocks, the Nissequogues, the Setaukets, the Corchaugs, the Secatogues, the Unkechaugs, the Shinnecocks, the Montauketts, and the Manhasets.
Instead, Native American peoples on Long Island are descended from two major language and cultural groups of the many Algonquian peoples who occupied Atlantic coastal areas from present-day Canada through the American South.

Shawnee

Shawnee IndiansShawneesShawnee people
The historic peoples of the Illinois Country were the Shawnee, Illiniwek, Kickapoo, Menominee, Miami, Sauk and Meskwaki.
The Algonquian nations of present-day Canada regarded the US Shawnee as their southernmost branch.

Abenaki

Abenaki peopleAbenakisAbnaki
The French and later English encountered the Maliseet of present-day Maine, Quebec and New Brunswick; the Abenaki of Quebec, Vermont and New Hampshire; the Mi'kmaw band governments of the Maritimes lived primarily on fishing.
They made war primarily against neighboring Algonquian peoples, including the Abenaki.

Nanticoke people

NanticokeNanticoke Indian TribeNanticoke tribe
Historic people also included the Nanticoke, Wicocomico, Secotan, Chowanoke, Weapemeoc, and Chickahominy.
The Nanticoke people are an indigenous American Algonquian people, whose traditional homelands are in Chesapeake Bay and Delaware.

Arapaho

ArapahoeNorthern ArapahoArapahos
The Arapaho, Blackfoot and Cheyenne developed as indigenous to the Great Plains.

Narragansett people

NarragansettNarragansettsNarragansett tribe
The Mohegan, Pequot, Pocumtuc, Tunxis, and Narragansett were based in southern New England.
Historians and archeologists knew that maize was cultivated by Algonquin tribes, but there has never been physical evidence before the discovery of this site.

Meskwaki

FoxMesquakieFox Indians
The historic peoples of the Illinois Country were the Shawnee, Illiniwek, Kickapoo, Menominee, Miami, Sauk and Meskwaki.
Meskwaki are of Algonquian origin from the prehistoric Woodland period culture area.

Croatan

CroatoanCroatansCroatoan Nation
Now extinct as a tribe, they were one of the Carolina Algonquian peoples, numerous at the time of English encounter in the 16th century.

Maliseet

WolastoqiyikMaleciteMaliseet people
The French and later English encountered the Maliseet of present-day Maine, Quebec and New Brunswick; the Abenaki of Quebec, Vermont and New Hampshire; the Mi'kmaw band governments of the Maritimes lived primarily on fishing.
*Algonquian peoples