Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice in WonderlandAliceWonderlandAdventures in WonderlandAlice's AdventuresMalice in Wonderlandnovel of the same namerabbit hole metaphor1865 classic1865 novel
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.wikipedia
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Lewis Carroll

Carroll, LewisCharles Lutwidge DodgsonCarroll
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862 (this popular date of the "golden afternoon" might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy ), up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church): Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of world-famous children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass.

Alice (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

AliceAlice KingsleighAlice in Wonderland
It tells of a young girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures.
Alice is a fictional character and protagonist of Lewis Carroll's children's novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass (1871).

Alice Liddell

AliceA Boat Beneath a Sunny SkyAlice Hargreaves
Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862 (this popular date of the "golden afternoon" might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy ), up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church): Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).
One of the stories he told her during a boating trip became the children's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Literary nonsense

nonsensenonsensicalnonsense literature
It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.
Lewis Carroll continued this trend, making literary nonsense a worldwide phenomenon with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871).

Robinson Duckworth

Canon DuckworthCanon Robinson DuckworthDuckworth
Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862 (this popular date of the "golden afternoon" might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy ), up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church): Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).
The Reverend Robinson Duckworth, DD, CVO, VD (4 December 1834 – 20 September 1911), was a British priest, who was present on the original boating expedition of 4 July 1862 during which Alice's adventures were first told by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson).

Caterpillar (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

CaterpillarThe CaterpillarAbsolem
Chapter Five – Advice from a Caterpillar: Alice comes upon a mushroom and sitting on it is a blue Caterpillar smoking a hookah.
The Caterpillar (also known as the Hookah-Smoking Caterpillar) is a fictional character appearing in Lewis Carroll's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

John Tenniel

Sir John TennielTenniel John Tenniel
He added his own illustrations but approached John Tenniel to illustrate the book for publication, telling him that the story had been well liked by children.
Tenniel is remembered especially as the principal political cartoonist for Punch magazine for over 50 years, and for his illustrations to Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871).

Cheshire Cat

The Cheshire Catappears and disappears at willCheshire Cookie Cat
The Duchess's Cook is throwing dishes and making a soup that has too much pepper, which causes Alice, the Duchess, and her baby (but not the cook or grinning Cheshire Cat) to sneeze violently.
The Cheshire Cat ( or ) is a fictional cat popularised by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and known for its distinctive mischievous grin.

Queen of Hearts (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

Queen of HeartsThe Queen of HeartsQueen
Chapter Eight – The Queen's Croquet Ground: Alice leaves the tea party and enters the garden where she comes upon three living playing cards painting the white roses on a rose tree red because The Queen of Hearts hates white roses.
The Queen of Hearts is a fictional character from the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by the writer Lewis Carroll.

Hatter (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

Mad HatterThe Mad HatterHatter
Chapter Seven – A Mad Tea-Party: Alice becomes a guest at a "mad" tea party along with the March Hare, the Hatter, and a very tired Dormouse who falls asleep frequently, only to be violently awakened moments later by the March Hare and the Hatter.
The Hatter is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass.

Duchess (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

Duchessthe DuchessDuchess (''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'')
Chapter Six – Pig and Pepper: A Fish-Footman has an invitation for the Duchess of the house, which he delivers to a Frog-Footman.
The Duchess is a character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, published in 1865.

Mouse (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

MouseThe Mousea mouse in a rowboat
After shrinking down again due to a fan she had picked up, Alice swims through her own tears and meets a Mouse, who is swimming as well.
The Mouse is a fictional character in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Mock Turtle

The Queen of Hearts dismisses her on the threat of execution and she introduces Alice to the Gryphon, who takes her to the Mock Turtle.
The Mock Turtle is a fictional character devised by Lewis Carroll from his popular book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Through the Looking-Glass

Alice Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found ThereThrough the Looking Glass
One of Tenniel's illustrations in Through the Looking-Glass — the 1871 sequel to Alice — depicts the character referred to as the "Man in White Paper" (whom Alice meets as a fellow passenger riding on the train with her) as a caricature of Disraeli, wearing a paper hat.
Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871 ) (also known as "Alice through the Looking-Glass" or simply "Through the Looking-Glass") is a novel by Lewis Carroll and the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865).

King of Hearts (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

King of HeartsKingThe King of Hearts
The jury is composed of various animals, including Bill the Lizard, the White Rabbit is the court's trumpeter, and the judge is the King of Hearts.
The King of Hearts is a character from the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Anthropomorphism

anthropomorphicpersonificationanthropomorphized
It tells of a young girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures.
Building on the popularity of fables and fairy tales, specifically children's literature began to emerge in the nineteenth century with works such as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) by Lewis Carroll, The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883) by Carlo Collodi and The Jungle Book (1894) by Rudyard Kipling, all employing anthropomorphic elements.

Gryphon (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

GryphonGryphon (''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'')The Gryphon
The Queen of Hearts dismisses her on the threat of execution and she introduces Alice to the Gryphon, who takes her to the Mock Turtle.
The Gryphon is a fictional character devised by Lewis Carroll in the popular book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Henry Liddell

LiddellLiddell, Henry GeorgeHenry George Liddell
Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862 (this popular date of the "golden afternoon" might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy ), up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church): Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).
Lewis Carroll wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for Henry Liddell's daughter Alice.

White Rabbit

The White RabbitNivens McTwisp the White Rabbita taxidermically stuffed White Rabbit
She then notices a talking, clothed White Rabbit with a pocket watch run past.
The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

You Are Old, Father William

Father WilliamFather William' poem
"You Are Old, Father William"—a parody of Robert Southey's "The Old Man's Comforts and How He Gained Them"
"You Are Old, Father William" is a poem by Lewis Carroll that appears in his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865).

The Annotated Alice

The Complete Annotated Alice
In The Annotated Alice, Martin Gardner provides background information for the characters.
The Annotated Alice is a work by Martin Gardner incorporating the text of Lewis Carroll's major tales, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the original illustrations by John Tenniel.

'Tis the Voice of the Lobster

Lobster Quadrillethe poetry she recites
Chapter Ten – Lobster Quadrille: The Mock Turtle and the Gryphon dance to the Lobster Quadrille, while Alice recites (rather incorrectly) "'Tis the Voice of the Lobster".
"'Tis the Voice of the Lobster" is a poem by Lewis Carroll that appears in Chapter 10 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Fantasy

fantasy fictionfantasiesfantastic
Its narrative course, structure, characters, and imagery have been enormously influential in both popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre.
For many years, this and successes such as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), created the circular effect that all fantasy works, even the later The Lord of the Rings, were therefore classified as children's literature.

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat

Twinkle, twinkle little bat
"Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat"—a parody of Jane Taylor's "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star"
"Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat" is a poem recited by the Mad Hatter in chapter seven of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

The Dormouse

DormouseMallymkunMallymkun -The Dormouse
Chapter Seven – A Mad Tea-Party: Alice becomes a guest at a "mad" tea party along with the March Hare, the Hatter, and a very tired Dormouse who falls asleep frequently, only to be violently awakened moments later by the March Hare and the Hatter.
The Dormouse is a character in "A Mad Tea-Party", Chapter VII from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.