Alice Liddell

AliceA Boat Beneath a Sunny SkyAlice HargreavesAlice Liddell HargreavesAlice Pleasance LiddellLiddell
Alice Pleasance Hargreaves, née Liddell (4 May 1852 – 16 November 1934), was, in her childhood, an acquaintance and photography subject of Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson).wikipedia
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice in WonderlandAliceWonderland
One of the stories he told her during a boating trip became the children's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862 (this popular date of the "golden afternoon" might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy ), up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church): Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).

Frederick Francis Liddell

FrederickFrederick LiddellFrederick Lidell
She had two older brothers, Harry (born 1847) and Arthur (1850–53), an older sister Lorina (born 1849), and six younger siblings, including her sister Edith (born 1854) to whom she was very close and her brother Frederick (born 1865), who became a lawyer and senior civil servant.
He was born in 1865, the son of Henry Liddell, the Dean of Christ Church; his older sister, Alice, would become famous as "Alice in Wonderland".

Reginald Hargreaves

She married cricketer Reginald Hargreaves, and they had three sons.
He also played at first-class level for Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), an England XI, Gentlemen of England, I Zingari and AW Ridley's XI. He married Alice Liddell, who as a girl had inspired Lewis Carroll's fantasy stories.

Henry Liddell

LiddellLiddell, Henry GeorgeHenry George Liddell
Alice Liddell was the fourth of the ten children of Henry Liddell, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, one of the editors of A Greek-English Lexicon, and his wife Lorina Hanna Liddell (née Reeve).
Lewis Carroll wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for Henry Liddell's daughter Alice.

A Greek–English Lexicon

Greek-English LexiconGreek–English LexiconLSJ
Alice Liddell was the fourth of the ten children of Henry Liddell, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, one of the editors of A Greek-English Lexicon, and his wife Lorina Hanna Liddell (née Reeve).
The first editor of the LSJ, Henry George Liddell, was Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, and the father of Alice Liddell, the eponymous Alice of the writings of Lewis Carroll.

Lewis Carroll

Carroll, LewisCharles Lutwidge DodgsonCarroll
Alice Pleasance Hargreaves, née Liddell (4 May 1852 – 16 November 1934), was, in her childhood, an acquaintance and photography subject of Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). On 4 July 1862, in a rowing boat travelling on the Isis from Folly Bridge, Oxford, to Godstow for a picnic outing, 10-year-old Alice asked Charles Dodgson (who wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll) to entertain her and her sisters, Edith (aged 8) and Lorina (13), with a story.
He was widely assumed for many years to have derived his own "Alice" from Alice Liddell; the acrostic poem at the end of Through the Looking-Glass spells out her name in full, and there are also many superficial references to her hidden in the text of both books.

Llandudno

Llandudno JunctionCraigside, Llandudno, WalesLlandudno, Wales
She and her family regularly spent holidays at their holiday home Penmorfa, which later became the Gogarth Abbey Hotel, on the West Shore of Llandudno in North Wales.
It was here at Pen Morfa that Alice Liddell (of Alice in Wonderland fame) spent the long summer holidays of her childhood from 1862 to 1871.

Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany

Prince LeopoldLeopoldDuke of Albany
One story has it that she became a romantic interest of Prince Leopold, the youngest son of Queen Victoria, during the four years he spent at Christ Church, but the evidence for this is sparse. Frank Beddor wrote The Looking Glass Wars, which reimagines the Alice in Wonderland story and includes real-life characters such as the Liddells and Prince Leopold.
He was acquainted with Alice Liddell, the daughter of the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford for whom Lewis Carroll wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and was godfather of Alice's second son, who was named after him.

Lyndhurst, Hampshire

LyndhurstLyndhurst,St Michael and All Angels Church
For most of her life, Alice lived in and around Lyndhurst in the New Forest. After her death in 1934, she was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium and her ashes were buried in the graveyard of the church of St Michael and All Angels Lyndhurst.
The church of St. Michael and All Angels was built in the 1860s, and contains a fresco by Lord Leighton and stained-glass windows by Charles Kempe, William Morris, Edward Burne-Jones and others; Alice Liddell, the inspiration for Alice in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, is buried there.

John Ruskin

RuskinRuskinianRuskinian Gothic
Clark argues that in Victorian England such arrangements were not as improbable as they might seem; John Ruskin, for example, fell in love with a 12-year-old girl while Dodgson's younger brother sought to marry a 14-year-old, but postponed the wedding for six years.
His tutor, the Rev Walter Lucas Brown, was always encouraging, as were a young senior tutor, Henry Liddell (later the father of Alice Liddell) and a private tutor, the Rev Osborne Gordon.

Alice (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)

AliceAlice KingsleighAlice in Wonderland
The extent to which Dodgson's Alice may be or could be identified with Liddell is controversial.
Although she shares her given name with Alice Liddell, scholars disagree about the extent to which she was based upon Liddell.

Through the Looking-Glass

Alice Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found ThereThrough the Looking Glass
A second book about the character Alice, Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, followed in 1871.
"A boat beneath a sunny sky" is the first line of a titleless acrostic poem at the end of the book—the beginning letters of each line, when put together, spell Alice Pleasance Liddell.

Godstow

Godstow AbbeyAlice HenleyGodstow House
On 4 July 1862, in a rowing boat travelling on the Isis from Folly Bridge, Oxford, to Godstow for a picnic outing, 10-year-old Alice asked Charles Dodgson (who wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll) to entertain her and her sisters, Edith (aged 8) and Lorina (13), with a story.
In Victorian times, Charles Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) brought Alice Liddell (aka Alice in Wonderland) and her sisters, Edith and Lorina, for river trips and picnics at Godstow.

Dreamchild

The 1985 movie Dreamchild deals with her trip to America for the Columbia University presentation described above; through a series of flashbacks, it promotes the popular assumption that Dodgson was romantically attracted to Alice.
It stars Coral Browne, Ian Holm, Peter Gallagher, Nicola Cowper and Amelia Shankley and is a fictionalised account of Alice Liddell, the child who inspired Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

The Looking Glass Wars

Looking Glass WarsHatter Mthe Looking Glass Wars trilogy
Frank Beddor wrote The Looking Glass Wars, which reimagines the Alice in Wonderland story and includes real-life characters such as the Liddells and Prince Leopold.
The book's prologue tells of Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson showing Alice Liddell (who claims her name to be spelled 'Alyss') the manuscript for Alice's Adventures Underground.

Peter and Alice

Peter and Alice, John Logan's play in 2013, features the encounter of Alice Liddell Hargreaves and Peter Llewelyn Davies, one of the boys who inspired the Peter Pan character.
Peter and Alice is a play by American writer John Logan based on the meeting of 80-year-old Alice Liddell and Peter Llewelyn Davies, then in his thirties, in a London bookshop in 1932, at the opening of a Lewis Carroll exhibition.

Through the Looking Glass (opera)

Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking Glass'' (opera)
The 2008 opera by Alan John and Andrew Upton Through the Looking Glass covers both the fictional Alice and Liddell.
Through the Looking Glass is a chamber opera by the Australian composer Alan John to a libretto by Andrew Upton, based on Lewis Carroll's book and on the life of Alice Liddell, the girl for whom Carroll wrote the story's prequel, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Golders Green Crematorium

Golders GreenGolder's GreenGolders Green Cemetery
After her death in 1934, she was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium and her ashes were buried in the graveyard of the church of St Michael and All Angels Lyndhurst.
Alice Liddell, ashes removed to Lyndhurst, Hampshire (see Alice's Adventures in Wonderland).

Riverworld

booksDane Helstromnovel
She is one of the main characters of the Riverworld series of books by Philip José Farmer.
In Farmer's books a number of historical figures - including Sir Richard Burton, Alice Hargreaves, Samuel Clemens, King John of England, Cyrano de Bergerac, Tom Mix, Mozart, Jack London, Lothar von Richthofen, and Hermann Göring - interact with fictional characters to discover the Riverworld's purpose.

Melanie Benjamin (author)

Melanie BenjaminBenjamin, Melanie
Liddell is the main character of Melanie Benjamin's novel Alice I Have Been, a fictional account of Alice's life from childhood through old age, focusing on her relationship with Lewis Carroll and the impact that Alice's Adventures Under Ground had on her.
Her third novel, Alice I Have Been, was inspired by Alice Liddell Hargreaves's life.

Acrostic

acrosticsreading the first letteracrostic poem
Third, there is an acrostic poem at the end of Through the Looking-Glass.
In Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, the final chapter "A Boat, Beneath A Sunny Sky" is an acrostic of the real Alice's name: Alice Pleasance Liddell.

Bryan Talbot

Bryan
Liddell and Dodgson are used as protagonists in Bryan Talbot's 2007 graphic novel Alice in Sunderland to relay the history and myths of the area.
In 2007 he released Alice in Sunderland, which documents the connections between Lewis Carroll, Alice Liddell, and the Sunderland and Wearside area.

Mimsy Were the Borogoves

She plays a small but critical role in Lewis Padgett's short story "Mimsy Were the Borogoves".
The second box arrives in nineteenth-century England and is found by a child named Alice (possibly recognized by the reader as Alice Liddell), who one day recites some verse learned from one of its contents to her "Uncle Charles" (Charles Dodgson, better known today as Lewis Carroll).

Westerham

Westerham HillWesterham, Kent
Alice Liddell, cited as the inspiration for Lewis Carroll's children's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland lived in the Vicarage for a brief period.

Dean (education)

deanPrincipaldeans
Alice Liddell was the fourth of the ten children of Henry Liddell, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, one of the editors of A Greek-English Lexicon, and his wife Lorina Hanna Liddell (née Reeve).