Alice Miller (psychologist)

Alice MillerFor Your Own GoodMiller
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages.wikipedia
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Child abuse

abuseabusiveabused
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages.
The psychologist Alice Miller, noted for her books on child abuse, took the view that humiliations, spankings and beatings, slaps in the face, etc. are all forms of abuse, because they injure the integrity and dignity of a child, even if their consequences are not visible right away.

Poisonous pedagogy

poisonous pedagogiesSchwarze Pädagogik
In her books she departed from psychoanalysis, charging it with being similar to the poisonous pedagogies. Miller extended the trauma model to include all forms of child abuse, including those that were commonly accepted (such as spanking), which she called poisonous pedagogy, a non-literal translation of Katharina Rutschky's Schwarze Pädagogik (black or dark pedagogy/imprinting).
The psychologist Alice Miller used the concept to describe child-raising approaches that, she believed, damage a child's emotional development.

Psychoanalysis

psychoanalystpsychoanalyticpsychoanalytical
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages. In her books she departed from psychoanalysis, charging it with being similar to the poisonous pedagogies.
Challenges to analytic theory began with Otto Rank and Alfred Adler (turn of the 20th century), continued with behaviorists (e.g. Wolpe) into the 1940s and '50s, and have persisted (e.g. Miller).

Piotrków Trybunalski

PiotrkówPiotrkow10 – Piotrków Trybunalski
Miller was born in Piotrków Trybunalski, Poland into a Jewish family.

Katharina Rutschky

Miller extended the trauma model to include all forms of child abuse, including those that were commonly accepted (such as spanking), which she called poisonous pedagogy, a non-literal translation of Katharina Rutschky's Schwarze Pädagogik (black or dark pedagogy/imprinting).
She coined the term Schwarze Pädagogik (literally black pedagogy) in her eponymous book from 1977, describing physical and psychical violence as part of education (a notion elaborated upon some years later by Alice Miller).

University of Basel

BaselBasel UniversityUniversity of Basle
She retained her assumed name Alice Rostovska when she moved to Switzerland in 1946, where she had won a scholarship to the University of Basel.

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson

Jeffrey MassonJ. Moussaieff MassonMoussaieff Masson
She scrutinized Freud's drive theory, a device that, according to her and Jeffrey Masson, blames the child for the abusive sexual behavior of adults.
Masson was defended by Alice Miller

Guilt (emotion)

guiltguiltycollective guilt
She concluded that the feelings of guilt instilled in our minds since our most tender years reinforce our repression even in the psychoanalytic profession.
Alice Miller claims that "many people suffer all their lives from this oppressive feeling of guilt, the sense of not having lived up to their parents' expectations....no argument can overcome these guilt feelings, for they have their beginnings in life's earliest period, and from that they derive their intensity."

Jürgen Bartsch

She believed that forgiveness did not resolve hatred, but covered it in a dangerous way in the grown adult: displacement on scapegoats, as she discussed in her psycho-biographies of Adolf Hitler and Jürgen Bartsch, both of whom she described as having suffered severe parental abuse.

Alison Bechdel

AlisonAllison BechdelAllison
* Are You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel
This episode riffs heavily on psychoanalytic themes quoted explicitly from the work of psychoanalysts Alice Miller and Winnicott.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages.

Switzerland

SwissSwiss ConfederationSWI
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages. She retained her assumed name Alice Rostovska when she moved to Switzerland in 1946, where she had won a scholarship to the University of Basel.

Psychologist

psychologistsclinical psychologistresearch psychologist
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages.

Philosopher

philosopherssagephilosophical
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Alice Miller, born as Alicija Englard (12 January 1923 – 14 April 2010), was a Polish-Swiss psychologist, psychoanalyst and philosopher of Jewish origin, who is noted for her books on parental child abuse, translated into several languages.

Berlin

Berlin, GermanyState of BerlinGerman capital
From 1931 to 1933 the family lived in Berlin, where nine-year-old Alicija learned the German language.

Nazi Party

NSDAPNazisNazi
Due to the National Socialists' seizure of power in Germany in 1933 the family turned back to Piotrków Trybunalski.

Adolf Hitler's rise to power

MachtergreifungNazi seizure of powertook power
Due to the National Socialists' seizure of power in Germany in 1933 the family turned back to Piotrków Trybunalski.

Jewish ghettos in German-occupied Poland

GhettoJewish ghettoghettoised Jews
As a young woman, Miller managed to escape the Jewish Ghetto in Piotrków Trybunalski, where all Jewish inhabitants were interned since October 1939, and survived World War II in Warsaw under the assumed name of Alicja Rostowska.

Piotrków Trybunalski Ghetto

in Piotrków TrybunalskiPiotrków GhettoPiotrków Trybunalski (Petrikau) Ghetto
As a young woman, Miller managed to escape the Jewish Ghetto in Piotrków Trybunalski, where all Jewish inhabitants were interned since October 1939, and survived World War II in Warsaw under the assumed name of Alicja Rostowska.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
As a young woman, Miller managed to escape the Jewish Ghetto in Piotrków Trybunalski, where all Jewish inhabitants were interned since October 1939, and survived World War II in Warsaw under the assumed name of Alicja Rostowska.

Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, PolandWarschau
As a young woman, Miller managed to escape the Jewish Ghetto in Piotrków Trybunalski, where all Jewish inhabitants were interned since October 1939, and survived World War II in Warsaw under the assumed name of Alicja Rostowska.

Der Spiegel

SpiegelSpiegel TVSpiegel Online
Shortly after his mother's death Martin Miller stated in an interview with Der Spiegel that he had been beaten by his authoritarian father during his childhood - in the presence of his mother.

Doctorate

doctoraldoctoral degreedoctorate degree
In 1953 Miller gained her doctorate in philosophy, psychology and sociology.

Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
In 1953 Miller gained her doctorate in philosophy, psychology and sociology.