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The Championships, Wimbledon

WimbledonWimbledon Tennis ChampionshipsWimbledon Championships
It is best known as the venue for the Wimbledon Championships, the only Grand Slam tennis event still held on grass.
It has been held at the All England Club in Wimbledon, London, since 1877 and is played on outdoor grass courts.

Grand Slam (tennis)

Grand SlamGrand Slamscareer Grand Slam
It is best known as the venue for the Wimbledon Championships, the only Grand Slam tennis event still held on grass.

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent

Duke of KentThe Duke of KentHRH The Duke of Kent
The patron of the club is Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and the President is The Duke of Kent.
He is president of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, presenting the trophies to the Wimbledon champion and runner-up, and served as the United Kingdom's Special Representative for International Trade and Investment, retiring in 2001.

Wimbledon, London

WimbledonWimbledon, SurreyWimbledon, England
The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, also known as the All England Club, based at Church Road, Wimbledon, London, England, is a private members' club.
By 1922, the popularity of tennis had grown to the extent that the club's small ground could no longer cope with the numbers of spectators and the renamed All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club moved to new grounds close to Wimbledon Park.

Tennis

tennis playerlawn tennisTennis, Boys
Croquet was very popular there until the then-infant sport of lawn tennis (a game introduced by Major Walter Clopton Wingfield a year or so prior, and originally called Sphairistikè) was introduced in 1875, when one lawn was set aside for this purpose.
This was three years before the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club would hold its first championships at Wimbledon, in 1877.

Centre Court

Wimbledon Centre CourtCentre Court, Wimbledonretractable roof
The current Centre Court dates from that year.
It incorporates the clubhouse of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.

Tennis at the 1908 Summer Olympics

Tennis1908tennis event
For the 1908 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the Grass Courts tennis events.
The indoor events were held at the covered courts of the Queens Club and began on May 6, 1908, ahead of the official start of the Games while the outdoor tournament was played on grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club at Worple Road from July 6 through July 11, 1908.

Croquet

croquet malletassociation croquetcroquet ball
The Club was founded by six gentlemen at the offices of The Field on 23 July 1868 at the height of a croquet craze as the All England Croquet Club, and held its first croquet competition in 1870.
The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club still has a croquet lawn, but has not hosted any significant tournaments.

London New Zealand RFC

London New ZealandLondon New Zealand Rugby ClubNew Zealand Sports and Social Club
This was leased to the New Zealand Sports and Social Club and became known as Aorangi Park (Aorangi means "Cloud Piercer", and is the Māori part of Aoraki/Mount Cook; "Aorangi" is the standard Māori spelling and "Aoraki" is used in the Māori dialect in the vicinity of the mountain).
The club were initially based at Aorangi Park in Wimbledon leased from the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.

Tennis at the 2012 Summer Olympics

Tennis2012 Summer OlympicsOlympics
The Club was the venue for the tennis event at the 2012 Summer Olympics.
The tennis tournaments at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London were staged at the All England Club in Wimbledon, from 28 July to 5 August.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge

Duchess of CambridgeKate MiddletonCatherine Middleton
The patron of the club is Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and the President is The Duke of Kent.
In 2017, she replaced the Queen as patron of The Lawn Tennis Association, All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, and Action for Children.

Spencer Gore (sportsman)

Spencer GoreSpencer William GoreSpencer
The champion, Spencer Gore, opined that "Lawn tennis will never rank among our great games."
In 1877 the first Wimbledon lawn tennis championship was held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club which had been renamed from the All England Croquet Club since tennis had been established there two years earlier.

No. 1 Court (Wimbledon)

No. 1 CourtNo.1 CourtCourt No1
The other 'show court' is No.1 Court, built in 1997, which holds around 11,500 people and occasionally plays host to Davis Cup matches (Centre Court usually being reserved for the Wimbledon Championships).
The No. 1 Court is a tennis court at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, Wimbledon, London.

No. 2 Court (Wimbledon)

No. 2 CourtNo.2 CourtNo.2
A new No.2 Court with 4,000 seats was first used at the 2009 Championships.
No. 2 Court is a tennis court at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, Wimbledon, London.

1908 Summer Olympics

19081908 Olympics1908 London
For the 1908 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the Grass Courts tennis events.

No. 3 Court (Wimbledon)

No. 3 CourtNo.3 CourtCourt No. 3
The old No.2 Court was renamed No.3 Court in 2009, and was rebuilt after the 2009 Championships.
No.3 Court is a tennis court at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, Wimbledon, London.

If—

Ifhomonymous poempoem
The quotation above the players' entrance to Centre Court is an extract from the poem "If—", by Rudyard Kipling, which reads: "If you can meet with triumph and disaster and treat those two impostors just the same."
In Britain, the third and fourth lines of the second stanza of the poem: "If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster / and treat those two impostors just the same" are written on the wall of the players' entrance to the Centre Court at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, where the Wimbledon Championships are held.

Walter Clopton Wingfield

Major Walter Clopton WingfieldMajor Clopton WingfieldMajor Walter Wingfield
Croquet was very popular there until the then-infant sport of lawn tennis (a game introduced by Major Walter Clopton Wingfield a year or so prior, and originally called Sphairistikè) was introduced in 1875, when one lawn was set aside for this purpose.
In 1877 the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC) launched the Wimbledon Championship and prior to this, in cooperation with the MCC representatives, developed a new set of rules that excluded some of Wingfield's introductions.

2012 Wimbledon Championships

Wimbledon2012Wimbledon Championships
Andy Murray and Jarkko Nieminen elected to bow when the Queen visited The Championships for their 2010 second round match, as did Roger Federer and Fabio Fognini at their second round match, watched by the Prince of Wales, in 2012.
The 2012 Wimbledon Championships was a tennis tournament played on grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London in England.

Roger Federer

FedererR Federer
Andy Murray and Jarkko Nieminen elected to bow when the Queen visited The Championships for their 2010 second round match, as did Roger Federer and Fabio Fognini at their second round match, watched by the Prince of Wales, in 2012.
Victory at Wimbledon equaled him with Björn Borg for the record of five consecutive championships at the All England Club.

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum

All England Club's Museum
The Club also houses the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum.
On the 12 April 2006, HRH The Duke of Kent declared the brand new Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum open to the public inside the grounds of the All England Lawn Tennis Club.

Wimbledon Effect

Wimbledon effects
The Wimbledon Effect
The Wimbledon effect (Japanese: ウィンブルドン現象, rōmaji: Uinburudon Genshō, literally "Wimbledon Phenomenon") is a chiefly British and Japanese analogy (which possibly originated in Japan ) which compares the tennis fame of the Wimbledon Championships, held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London, with the economic success of the United Kingdom's financial services industries – especially those clustered in the City of London.

Wimbledon Manor House

Wimbledon manorWimbledon PalaceManor of Wimbledon
Wimbledon Manor House
42 acres, previously part of the manor parklands, are now occupied by the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club that has made Wimbledon synonymous with tennis.

Lolium perenne

perennial ryegrassperennial rye-grassrye-grass
The grass has been cut to 8 mm since 1995, and 100% perennial ryegrass has been used for its strength since 2001 (prior to that, it was 70% perennial rye and 30% creeping red fescue).
It is also the grass used on the courts at the All England Lawn Tennis Club in Wimbledon.

Angela Buxton

According to Angela Buxton, the Jewish former British Wimbledon doubles champion, it also has led to her exclusion.
No Jewish tennis players were admitted to the All England Lawn Tennis Club until 1952.