Allah

GodAllāhAlmighty AllahGod Almightyal-LāhAlahaAllaahAllah (word)Allah AlmightyAllah Rabbul Izza
Allah is the Arabic word for God in Abrahamic religions.wikipedia
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God in Abrahamic religions

GodAbrahamic GodGod of Abraham
Allah is the Arabic word for God in Abrahamic religions.
Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the Bahai Faith are called Abrahamic religions because they all accept the tradition of the God (known as Yahweh in Hebrew and Allah in Arabic) that revealed himself to Abraham.

Muslims

MuslimMoslemMoslems
More specifically, it has been used as a term for God by Muslims (both Arab and non-Arab) and Arab Christians.
The beliefs of Muslims include: that God (الله [[Allāh|]]) is eternal, transcendent and absolutely one (tawhid); that God is incomparable, self-sustaining and neither begets nor was begotten; that Islam is the complete and universal version of a primordial faith that has been revealed before through many prophets including Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac, Moses, and Jesus; that these previous messages and revelations have been partially changed or corrupted over time (tahrif) and that the Quran is the final unaltered revelation from God (Final Testament).

Kaaba

Ka'abaKa'baKa'bah
According to that hypothesis, the Kaaba was first consecrated to a supreme deity named Allah and then hosted the pantheon of Quraysh after their conquest of Mecca, about a century before the time of Muhammad.
It is considered by Muslims to be the Bayt Allāh (بَيْت ٱلله, "House of God"), and has a similar role to the Tabernacle and Holy of Holies in Judaism.

Elohim

GodEloahElokim
Biblical Hebrew mostly uses the plural (but functional singular) form Elohim, but more rarely it also uses the singular form Eloah.
An exact cognate outside of Hebrew is found in Ugaritic ʾlhm, the family of El, the creator god and chief deity of the Canaanite pantheon, in Biblical Aramaic ʼĔlāhā and later Syriac Alaha ("God"), and in Arabic ʾilāh ("god, deity") (or Allah as "The [single] God").

Arabs

ArabArab peopleArabian
The word Allah has been used by Arabic people of different religions since pre-Islamic times.
It is revered as the language that God chose to reveal the Quran.

Names of God in Judaism

AdonaiGodHaShem
The word is thought to be derived by contraction from al-ilāh, which means "the god", and is related to El and Elah, the Hebrew and Aramaic words for God.

Tasbih

Subhan AllahTasbeehSubhan'Allah
There are certain phrases in praise of God that are favored by Muslims, including "[[subhan'allah|]]" (Holiness be to God), "[[Alhamdulillah|]]" (Praise be to God), "[[Shahada|]]" (There is no deity but God) and "[[Takbir|]]" (God is greater) as a devotional exercise of remembering God (dhikr).
Tasbīḥ is a form of dhikr that involves the repetitive utterances of short sentences in the praise and glorification of Allah in Islam, by saying Subḥānallāh (سُـبْـحَـانَ ٱلله, meaning "God is perfect (free of any errors/defects)").

Arab Christians

Arab ChristianChristianChristian Arab
More specifically, it has been used as a term for God by Muslims (both Arab and non-Arab) and Arab Christians.
Like Arab Muslims, Arab Christians refer to God as Allah, as an Arabic word for "God".

Takbir

Allahu AkbarGod is greatAllāhu Akbar
There are certain phrases in praise of God that are favored by Muslims, including "[[subhan'allah|]]" (Holiness be to God), "[[Alhamdulillah|]]" (Praise be to God), "[[Shahada|]]" (There is no deity but God) and "[[Takbir|]]" (God is greater) as a devotional exercise of remembering God (dhikr).
The form is the nominative of Allah, meaning "God".

Quran

Qur'anKoranQur’an
According to Francis Edward Peters, "The Qur’ān insists, Muslims believe, and historians affirm that Muhammad and his followers worship the same God as the Jews . The Qur’an's Allah is the same Creator God who covenanted with Abraham".
The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"), also romanized Qur'an or Koran, is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah).

Shahada

shahadahThere is no God but AllahLa ilaha ilallah
There are certain phrases in praise of God that are favored by Muslims, including "[[subhan'allah|]]" (Holiness be to God), "[[Alhamdulillah|]]" (Praise be to God), "[[Shahada|]]" (There is no deity but God) and "[[Takbir|]]" (God is greater) as a devotional exercise of remembering God (dhikr).
In the English translation—"There is no god but God. Muhammad is the messenger of God."—the first, lower-case occurrence of "god" is a translation of the Arabic word ilah, while the capitalized second and third occurrences of "God" are translations of the Arabic word Allah.

Creator deity

Creatorcreator godthe Creator
Some authors have suggested that polytheistic Arabs used the name as a reference to a creator god or a supreme deity of their pantheon.
According to Islam, God, known in Arabic as Allah, is the all-powerful and all-knowing Creator, Sustainer, Ordainer, and Judge of the universe.

El (deity)

ElGodEl (god)
The word is thought to be derived by contraction from al-ilāh, which means "the god", and is related to El and Elah, the Hebrew and Aramaic words for God.

Alhamdulillah

TahmidAl-hamdu lilahAl-ḥamdu li-llāh
There are certain phrases in praise of God that are favored by Muslims, including "[[subhan'allah|]]" (Holiness be to God), "[[Alhamdulillah|]]" (Praise be to God), "[[Shahada|]]" (There is no deity but God) and "[[Takbir|]]" (God is greater) as a devotional exercise of remembering God (dhikr).
The word Allāh means "The God", and it is a contraction of the definite article al- and the word ʾilāh (إِلَـٰه, "god, deity").

Monotheism

monotheisticmonotheistmonotheists
This addition was made to emphasize the monotheistic aspect of Trinitarian belief and also to make it more palatable to Muslims.
In Islam, God (Allāh) is all-powerful and all-knowing, the creator, sustainer, ordainer and judge of the universe.

Arabic definite article

al-aldefinite article
The word is thought to be derived by contraction from al-ilāh, which means "the god", and is related to El and Elah, the Hebrew and Aramaic words for God. Others held that it was borrowed from Syriac or Hebrew, but most considered it to be derived from a contraction of the Arabic definite article al- "the" and ' "deity, god" to ' meaning "the deity", or "the God".
Of special interest is the origin of the word Allah.

Pre-Islamic Arabia

pre-Islamicpre-Islamic eraancient Arabia
The word Allah has been used by Arabic people of different religions since pre-Islamic times.
Different theories have been proposed regarding the role of Allah in Meccan religion.

Dhikr

zikrzikirDhakir
There are certain phrases in praise of God that are favored by Muslims, including "[[subhan'allah|]]" (Holiness be to God), "[[Alhamdulillah|]]" (Praise be to God), "[[Shahada|]]" (There is no deity but God) and "[[Takbir|]]" (God is greater) as a devotional exercise of remembering God (dhikr).
Muslims believe dhikr is one of the best ways to enter the higher level of Heaven and to glorify the Oneness of Allah.

Deity

deitiesgodsgod
Others held that it was borrowed from Syriac or Hebrew, but most considered it to be derived from a contraction of the Arabic definite article al- "the" and ' "deity, god" to ' meaning "the deity", or "the God".
It appears in the name of the monotheistic god of Islam as Allah ().

Basmala

Bismillah786Bismallah
Muslim discursive piety encourages beginning things with the invocation of [[Basmala|]] (meaning 'in the name of God').
The three definite nouns of the Basmala—Allah, ar-Rahman and ar-Rahim—correspond to the first three of the traditional 99 names of God in Islam.

Comparative religion

comparative religionscomparative study of religioncomparative
The history of the name Allāh in English was probably influenced by the study of comparative religion in the 19th century; for example, Thomas Carlyle (1840) sometimes used the term Allah but without any implication that Allah was anything different from God.
For Muslims, the Qur'an is the final, complete revelation from God (Arabic الله Allah), who believe it to have been revealed to Muhammad alone, who is believed by Muslims to be the final prophet of Islam, and the Khatam an-Nabiyyin, meaning the last of the prophets ever sent by Allah ("seal of the prophets").

Son of God

SonGod's SonHis Son
(Even the Arabic-descended Maltese language of Malta, whose population is almost entirely Roman Catholic, uses Alla for "God".) Arab Christians, for example, use the terms ' for God the Father, ' for God the Son, and for God the Holy Spirit.
In Islam, Jesus is known as Īsā ibn Maryam, and is understood to be a prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and al-Masih, the Arabic term for Messiah (Christ), sent to guide the Children of Israel (banī isrā'īl in Arabic) with a new revelation, the al-Injīl (Arabic for "the gospel").

Syria

Syrian Arab RepublicSyrianEtymology of Syria
"Allah" was also mentioned in pre-Islamic Christian poems by some Ghassanid and Tanukhid poets in Syria and Northern Arabia.
They labelled Assad the "enemy of Allah" and called for a jihad against his rule.

Trinity

Holy TrinityTrinitarianTrinitarianism
They adopted the Muslim ', and also created their own Trinitized ' as early as the 8th century.
Islam considers Jesus to be a prophet, but not divine, and Allah to be absolutely indivisible (a concept known as tawhid).

Allah as a lunar deity

Allah a "moon godAllah as moon godAllah, the moon god
The claim that Allah (the name of God in Islam) historically originates as a moon god worshipped in pre-Islamic Arabia originates in early 20th-century scholarship, most prominently advocated by American evangelicals from the 1990s.